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Advice on how to age wood (using real wood)

Discussion in 'What would you like to learn here?' started by Rett Mikhal, Apr 28, 2016.


  1. Rett Mikhal

    Rett Mikhal Young Tutorling

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    I have a project for a friend of mine to make a set of small jewelry boxes look very old and rustic. I've never painted wood with an airbrush, so I was looking for any advice. Almost every result I find in searches is to make a wood texture from scratch on non-wood surfaces, but in this case I'm fine with using the existing grain but want to simulate a very old wood texture. Maybe the best solution is to paint it flat and start from scratch, I'm not sure. Any advice would be appreciated.
  2. Madbrush

    Madbrush Guest

    Bury it in the garden for a few days and let nature take its course, if you in a monsoon area the procedure will speed up greatly:thumbsup:
    matty171 likes this.
  3. Rett Mikhal

    Rett Mikhal Young Tutorling

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    Well I would like to just SIMULATE the rotting wood so they can actually be used. I applaud you for the out of the box thinking, though.
    matty171 likes this.
  4. Madbrush

    Madbrush Guest

    LOL, if you already have some weathering paint colours, search for some rotting wood images and try to copy what you see, to heighten the effect you could use some rough sandpaper to simulate wear and damage, I've never actually done it but that's how I would go about it, I'm pretty confident that that would get you to where you want to be.
  5. Rett Mikhal

    Rett Mikhal Young Tutorling

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    This would be my first weathering project, do you have any advice on tutorials to look up? As I said I tried finding them, but it's hard to find any specifically for painting ON wood. I suppose the principle is not much different than plastic or paper.
  6. Madbrush

    Madbrush Guest

    As I said I haven't done it myself, but I know that comes art paints have a weathering set with all the colours you could need to create wood rot, rust, exhaust fouling and such, I personally would just mix the colours myself using ochers and umbers.

    If the would is untreated so far you can paint straight onto it, if it has been lacquered simply scuff it with scotch brite to give a key and then proceed with your painting.

    If you go to Google images and type in "wood rot" "dead wood" and/or "old wood" you should be able to find some images that will give you an idea of what you need to recreate.p, just like painting a portrait or an animal, a reference is handy to have at hand, we need it to decipher shapes and match colours.

    When you complete your art work and it's properly dried you can hit with a couple of coats of normal varnish, since it has to look old I would use a matt varnish.
  7. markjthomson

    markjthomson Very happy! Staff Member Mod

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    Hey Rett, can you go along to the introduction section and tell us who you are? Where in the world do you live? What do you use? That sort of thing. We are a friendly bunch here and we like to know who we are talking too rather than some random someone turning up and asking questions. Here is the introductions link. http://www.airbrushforum.org/introductions/

    Read the nettiquette link as well... that will help you.

    Check out stressed wood... that might help. IT will help us if you post some photo's of what you want. @Madbrush gacve yo a good answer based on the information you gave us (you might have well asked us how long you need to cut a piece of string...) Let us know a bit more and we might be able to help.
  8. gordon enquist

    gordon enquist Young Tutorling

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    This suggestion comes from the model railway people. Black leather dye or India ink and denatured alcohol, 10 to 1 ratio (10 being the denatured alcohol) creates a barn gray to new wood. A coarse wire brush will distress the wood surface. Experiment first. Cheers Eh!
    JackEb and Squishy like this.
  9. ogre314

    ogre314 Young Tutorling

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    Where I work we actually match spray stains to change color of the wood but not loose the grains.. It's actually quite amazing what certain types of dyes do to wood. Then when you lacquer them! I would see if you have a paint store near you some where.. And I don't mean a rona or a Lowes or a home depot I mean like an actual paint store where they do custom matching.. Is what we call it...

    Sent from my LG-D852 using Tapatalk
  10. markjthomson

    markjthomson Very happy! Staff Member Mod

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    Hey @ogre314 good advice. Can I get you to go along to the introduction section and give an intro... where you live, what you spray with, what you are looking to do, experience, that sort of thing. Always a whole lot nicer chatting with people who have introduced themselves... :)

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