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Discussion in 'How to Control an Airbrush' started by makcity, Nov 21, 2012.


  1. makcity

    makcity Young Tutorling

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    I am a begginer and I can't find a source that Provides the fundmentals of Airbrushing.....I have checked out the basics in this site and Mastered most of the exercises...
  2. RandyHortonJr

    RandyHortonJr Spider Splatterer

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    If you're looking for free... YouTube is a worthwhile visit. Look for Jaime Rodriquez, Ed Hubbs, Mike Lavalee

    Check out some of the magazines for step by step instructional write ups, on line resources, dvd, book and equipment suppliers.

    reproductive organ Blick art store(also online and catalogs) had some fundamental books available. Hobby lobby does as well.

    Coastairbrush.com, tcpglobal.com, chicagoairbrushsupply.com are good resources for supplies and also stencils, videos and etc.

    Speaking of stencils... Airsick stencils have good ones available.
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
  3. RandyHortonJr

    RandyHortonJr Spider Splatterer

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    If you're looking for better instruction... You can take a class or classes with lots of talented professional artists depending on where you are located or how far you can travel. Not in any particular order...here are some to check out.

    Dru Blair
    Marissa Osterlee
    Ed Hubbs
    Eddie Davis
    And there's always the airbrush action magazine getaways where you can attend the class of your choice but observe any and all other classes as its an open layout. Some of their regular instructors are:
    Terry Hill
    Ryno Templeton
    Troy Pierce
    Javier Soto
    Jonathan Panthaleon
    Gary Worthington
    Jeff Styles
    Cheryl Vaughn
  4. AndreZA

    AndreZA Elite Member! Elite Member!

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    Best way to learn is to take the bull by the horns. Try and reproduce something. Everything is basic shapes and shading.
    DavidStank and HiraMahi like this.
  5. RebelAir

    RebelAir Air-Valve Autobot!

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    .....ask LOL..Theres plenty of guys and gals here and elsewhere m8 that are happy to answer any querie..Youtube as mentioned is a great resource with lots of lessons but many videos and such, many are short previews, but keep looking as you will find fuller length video's that may help you a lot..When asking about fundementals, what fundementals do you want as its such a varied hobby with LOTS of fundementals LOL..I'd also suggest looking into various artforms as much of the layering process of Airbrushing relates very closly to oils, acrylics and watercolor..If its just basic stoke theory theres a heck of a lot out there..GL and enjoy the adventure :)
  6. Strictly Attitude

    Strictly Attitude Air-Valve Autobot!

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    First welcome to the forum. Second you need to push your self there is no better teacher than doing it. Come up with projects that push you to try and learn different things.
  7. makcity

    makcity Young Tutorling

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    Thanks everyone this was very helpfull
  8. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Admin

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    If you are asking this question ,Than go practice some more, You are not ready and have not mastered dots, Dagger strokes and fades/blends.
    I am sure when you started to learn to airbrush you had a vision of what you wanted to paint for your first project, Well paint it , if you mess up , Well it is only paint. just paint it again .
    Practice it the key to anything you will every do in life. If you want to be the best you have to put in the work.
    Yes I know this is a harsh statement , But Have you painted the eye? have you worked through all that airbrush tutor (Mitch ) has offered you ? If so post it up , post up your dots and daggers
    Being this is your first post and not really an introduction , I will go ahead and welcome you to the forum,
  9. Tljakes

    Tljakes Young Tutorling

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    Welcome to the forum.
    I Agree fully with Mr. Micron. Being a beginner myself I have found that there is no person with a magic wand that can teach me to airbrush. I need to learn the basics (Dots, lines, fades, filling, daggerstrokes and as Jonathan Pantleone calls them Rat tails). I need to know how the airbrush operates, what causes the airbrush to stop doing what it did yesterday and what influence different paints and paint viscosities will have on what I want to get out of the airbrush.
    Boils down to making mistakes over and over till you get it right.
    I went out and bought myself a 60m roll of paper that is a full meter wide. My airbrush board I spray against is 1.1m x 1,2m which gives me a large canvas to play on I do around 20 different pictures on a sheet of paper with mostly the same pictures over and over to teach myself to control my brush. I've done around 20 pages in the last month and I still make mistakes but I can see an improvement as well. I took the plunge and started doing portraits. To me they are not yet perfect but people like them and pay me to do pictures they bring me. Every canvas is a huge challenge and I do the same picture 3 to 4 times before I actually put it onto canvas.
    It boils down to practice, practive and practice. I do daggerstrokes, dots and lines and fades/blends hundreds of times over and over and over as that is the basics.
    It's like martial arts. You still do the basics in training even though you reached black belt. How well you can apply the basics determines how good you'll get with the airbrush. By doing a page of daggerstrokes does not make you a master in dagger strokes. But by doing thousands of pages filled with dagger strokes will put you on the path of getting closer to mastering the art.
  10. ad fez

    ad fez kind of a big deal = Admington

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    yer I believe there is a great guy on youtube who gos by the name of acecustoms ; o)
  11. Codell

    Codell Young Tutorling

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    Hey if your going on youtube, check out steve nunez, not so much of a tutorial but his portraiture is outstanding
  12. frowan

    frowan Needle-chuck Ninja Very Likeable!

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    The best way, i run into frustration and overcome quickly


    Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk
  13. AndreZA

    AndreZA Elite Member! Elite Member!

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    Damn, where did you dig out this thread?
  14. frowan

    frowan Needle-chuck Ninja Very Likeable!

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    I'm sorry, my words came because I've ruined my last color portrait just when i was painting the eye brows. I darken a lot. I had to cover the area, incuding details (old man) and i will start again . Ommmmm


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  15. Squishy

    Squishy Queen Clown Slayer Mod

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    This is an oldie, but if any newbies reading this wants to know the answer, here goes:_

    If by 'mastering the fundamentals of airbrushing' someone means, definitive numbers and recipes etc regarding paint/reduction/air ratios - you won't find any as such, because they don't exist. The reason being that there are too many variables.

    Different airbrushes, brands, nozzles sizes, paints - even colours within the same paint brand, or whether they are opaque or transparent, what you want to paint - fine detail, blanket coverage, something in between, the surface you are painting on - fabric, hard, paper, board etc, the method or preference of painting style etc........means that there is no hard and fast one rule fits all. Even if you had two people painting the same image, on the same surface, with the same equipment and set up, but in different places, they won't have exactly the same ratios due to climate, environment and humidity, which can have a big effect.

    So while exercises can be shown, along with different methods and styles, and all the basic principles of art such as light source, proportion etc can be universally taught, paint/reduction/air ratios, flow and trigger control can't. The actual process of getting paint to flow as you need it is a very personal thing. The only thing you can do is have a methodical experimental approach, and record and compare results, to narrow down what works for you. The basic rule of thumb is to add reducer drop by drop, and adjust air to suit to get the effect you are looking for. The more reduction, the lower the pressure. However the lower the pressure the more layers you need to build colour, so if you need more immediate colour, you need more paint and less reducer, but more pressure. The lower the pressure the more control of detail, the higher the pressure the more coverage, but also more overspray. Some methods and paints don't require reduction at all however. Too much reduction, or too high a pressure result in spidering, and too little reduction or too high pressure will result in grainyness.

    The best way to learn, is to just give it a try, and learn what doesn't work. :) Then if you have any issues, ask the forum :)
    lisac likes this.

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