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Thinning colors

Discussion in 'What would you like to learn here?' started by Steve McCracken, Nov 27, 2016.


  1. Steve McCracken

    Steve McCracken Elite Member! Elite Member!

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    I am learning much, but my learning curve is high.

    Is there a way to thin colors for a way that is pretty much reliable. I cannot get the thinning to be reliable.

    Thank you, in advance.

    Steve
  2. basepaint

    basepaint Air-Valve Autobot!

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    When Thinning the paint it all depends on
    1. what brush and pressure are you using?
    2.how hot or cold it is where your painting?
    3.is it dry out or wet/humid?
    4.what your spraying for paint?(some spray great right out of the bottle)
    is it water based or not?
    so the simple answer would be no,But once you find what works for you most of the time that will make a good starting point and you can add paint or reducer as needed! Hope this helps
    Ricky Spanish and JackEb like this.
  3. Steve McCracken

    Steve McCracken Elite Member! Elite Member!

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    Basepaint,

    Thank you, here the weather is changing from hot to cold - I never thought of weather, (hits head with keyboard) thank you, much.
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  4. basepaint

    basepaint Air-Valve Autobot!

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    Your welcome, you might try some E-tac , com-art or createx Illastration colors those seem to spray the best for most people here.
  5. Steve McCracken

    Steve McCracken Elite Member! Elite Member!

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    I am going to get some createx - thank you for your help.
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  6. markjthomson

    markjthomson AKA Quick Draw !! (and still very happy) Staff Member Mod

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    OK take care with createx, it is problematic, it was designed for fabric application I believe. Createx illustration is better or com-art for general use
  7. Steve McCracken

    Steve McCracken Elite Member! Elite Member!

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    Mark, thank you. I have much to learn. Enjoy your Sunday.
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  8. markjthomson

    markjthomson AKA Quick Draw !! (and still very happy) Staff Member Mod

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    Hey have you seen the tutorial at the Airbrushtutor site...? You can also download templates of exercises... very useful.
  9. Squishy

    Squishy Queen Clown Slayer Mod

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    It also depends on what look you are hoping for. The most controllable way to paint (IMO) is to over reduce, and build tones and hue by layers, and minimising overspray. But there are times when you may want more immediate vibrant colour and you need to reduce less and increase pressure to suit - remembering to account for any overspray.

    There are too many variables for a universal reduction recipe, and as mentioned weather also plays a part. Different colours too, more heavily pigmented colours may require more reduction than others.

    Start with a drop of paint, and add a drop of reducer - spray, and add another drop of reducer etc, until you can spray a clean crisp unbroken line, and a satin smooth filled area. More reduction = less pressure. Spidering = less pressure or less reduction depending on desired colour density, grainyness = more reduction or more pressure depending on desired colour density.

    This then becomes your base mixture (which will probably be refined with experience). Then you can adjust if needed depending on colour or conditions. Hope that helps.
  10. Steve McCracken

    Steve McCracken Elite Member! Elite Member!

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    Squishy,

    I will try this. Experience is something I lack, thank you much.
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  11. Squishy

    Squishy Queen Clown Slayer Mod

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    No worries we've all been there. Some get lucky and find their sweetspot pretty quick, others like myself need a bit more experimentation ( and frustration lol), I'm a slow learner. But it is well worth taking the time. Once you have your flow right, it makes everything else so much easier, and you can concentrate on learning techniques.

    During this phase, as reductions aren't quite right it is very common for nozzles to become blocked or dirty. If you notice a double line look, having to pull back farther for paint, blobs appearing after you shut of the air, bubbles in the cup, or the needle feeling sticky or spongy if you undo the needle chuck and gently move it back and forth by hand - then the nozzle needs thorough, but gentle cleaning. Then when you think its clean, figure it will be tricking you (even if it looks spotless, don't believe it) and clean it again, its usually worth the effort.
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  12. Basstrack238

    Basstrack238 Needle-chuck Ninja

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    It's always different, try wicked detail, it's pretty good on its own, kinda transparent though. Regular wicked is good too, but some colors need more reduction than others, auto Air is pretty thick, but totally usable at high pressure and a smidgen of 4012 to help flow, or thinner if needed. There is so many options, you just gotta experiment. The 4012 is great to thin createX paints. It's all about pressure and viscosity, very dynamic.
  13. Louis D

    Louis D Double Actioner

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    For me, I've learned to take notes in my own little shorthand... I have one of this "catalogue" weather stations on my desk and using that information and the notes app on my phone I write down everything when make a mix and then comment on the result...
    For example...

    23 celsius. (no A/C)
    8ml Vallejo Reducer + 2ml Vallejo Metallic Black
    @ 20 psi
    splitting
    - 5 psi
    + 2ml reducer

    This just makes sense to me as I have it all saved on my cloud and when I am starting something now I just go straight to this point and it's a simple fiddle from that point. It seems much more logical to me at least.
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  14. Nada

    Nada Air-Valve Autobot!

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    When I started my issues with paint went all over the place.
    Now I don't even know how I reduce.. I just toss stuff in and go. Most of the time I will just over reduce adjust pressure to suit. Because it Can vary with temps and humidity... It is frustrating starting out.

    Even now if it's very extreme I can have problems with some paint.
    I also found when I went to better surfaces they were much more forgiving than on say paper.
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  15. Basstrack238

    Basstrack238 Needle-chuck Ninja

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    I would try some Bristol paper to start, it takes paint pretty well and then you can get an idea what your paint is doing. Smooth and flat I think is the hardest surface, there you will really see how your air and reduction works. You'll get all kinds of spiders and fun stuff til you figure it all out. It just takes time and practice, keep at it.
    Ricky Spanish likes this.

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