Airbrush space

J

Jeppery

Guest
Hi forum!

I hope you can help me with this as i can not for the life of me find anything helpful on the internet for my unique situation (which probably isn't even unique at all).

At the moment, I do my airbrushing in my parents garage, but since they live approx. 10 miles away from me I want to move my AB space to my apartment to make practice more convenient. Thing is, I have very limited space, a desk at which i have my computer screen and keyboard.
There's not a lot of room, the desk is 155cm wide and 65cm deep so that's what i have to work with.
Might add that i 90% of the time paint on A4 sized paper using Com-Art paints at about 15-25 psi.

So my questions are:
My walls are white and my floor is brand new (wouldn't want to stain it with paint really).
Can i still airbrush on this desk space?
Will an extraction fan with a filter remove the atomized paint floating in the air and VOC's or will my walls get all paint spattered from painting indoors?

Any tips on how to set up an optimal workspace for given conditions? My apartment is very stylistic so i want to keep everything neat or atleast easily cleanable.
I use a Smart jet attatched to a tank which i will put under the desk so compressor problem is solved :).

Hope this didn't turn into some kind of rant!
Thanks for reading!

/Jesper
 
Kinda depends on what your painting...meaning.. are you going to be blasting lots of paint or just little bits at a time. I would just buy a large tasteful poster for behind your desk to absorb overspray as opposed to getting on wall. A decent large area rug under your desk for paint spills (it will happen...I guarantee it :) ). If your gona be blasting large quantities I would save that for garage.
 
I think the most important point is, are you spraying water based media, or solvent based. From a purely H&S standpoint, waterbased you can get away with, solvent based? definately NOT!!! even spraying solvent based in the garage will require major considerations. Im sure others will expand on this. Good idea about the poster @Boltcase
Cheers
Iv
 
Water based only, over reduced so you can paint at low pressure to minimise paint in the atmosphere, for relatively close and detailed work, and you should be good. Larger areas, that you have to be a distance away or use higher pressures for, may allow paint to settle places you don't want, and as stated Uro's I would say are a no go without some proper ventilation, and any spills or paint residue could be a problem to remove.
 
@Boltcase grat advice!
I think ill buy a plastic mat used to protect the floor from the wheels on office chairs. Will protect from paint spills!
Also, i'm thinking of getting a glass table top as cleaning will become a lot easier.

Any other advice are welcome!

Like i said, i only use com-art water based paints which imo, does not need to be reduces with my Hi line HP CH.

I want to be able to spray from a reasonable distance as i think i'll have to at some point. Wouldn't a extraction fan do the job if it's reasonably sized? maybe a tabletop fan modded with a filter? Other ideas or input are much welcome!
 
@Boltcase Genious!
I understand the design and I'll definately build a modded version of this!!
I'm thinking of hiding the fan cavity under the desk :) Brilliant!
 
Cant wait to see it. You should do a write up on the steps for us...lets say...less engineering/mechanically inclined..lol. It is a great idea though.
 
If you could make the board magnetic it would even be better :)
 
@Boltcase I'll document the process for sure :)!
Do you think it would be effective hanging on the wall when using an easel in front of the "fan wall"?

Or would it make more sense to make the backplate of an easel into a fan wall, in that case i can see why making it magnetic makes sense!
 
Got lots of ideas for this!

At the moment I'm aiming at hooking up a couple of 200mm computer fans connected in parallel onto a 12V DC adapter onto an MDF board with some kind of filter. The basic principle is pretty much a fan board / kitchen fan mash up. (See picture)
kupa-diabol.jpg


Except, the fan board shall be tilt able so that it can just lay flat on the wall when no used.

input anyone?
 
I've made a small one of those picture frame type boards and they work quite well, It was only 700mm x 700mm aprox.. Stuck it together with Liquid nails and mounted a bathroom / shower fan in the back with a filter, then fitted a plug so I could shove it in the wall. Had a little accident with it and it fell apart. OK it fell over and I backed over it with the landrover.... So MK 2 will have to be created. Magnetic center board sounds like a great idea for MK 3 lol.

Lee
 
If your blastin paint then having a tabletop easel might render the wall mounted fan incapable due to distance and type of fans you plan on using. I like where yer goin with this though. A low decibel bathroom fan might be a good choice although a bit more pricey than computer fans.
 
Got lots of ideas for this!

At the moment I'm aiming at hooking up a couple of 200mm computer fans connected in parallel onto a 12V DC adapter onto an MDF board with some kind of filter. The basic principle is pretty much a fan board / kitchen fan mash up. (See picture)
kupa-diabol.jpg


Except, the fan board shall be tilt able so that it can just lay flat on the wall when no used.

input anyone?

I would make a guess that those fans are going to be way to small to even do anything. If you could read a part number off the fans you may be able to pull up a spec/data sheet of one and I'm going to guess that one fan alone is less than 50 CFM. Having two fan's will not automatically equate to 100 CFM either, if the fan was rated at 50 CFM. Also, you would want to have your power source in series to increase your voltage, in order to increase the speed of a DC motor you need to increase the voltage not the amperage. Adding a filter is going to reduce the air flow even further, reducing your total CFM from whatever fan setup you choose.

With your kitchen hood, sourcing one larger fan preferably AC would be the route that I would go. It would be cheaper to operate over using a dc power supply and DC fans. Depending on the size of the duct portion you are going to have a limited option.

The "spray booths" in the link above have "up to 1000 CFM." Which sounds like the fan and motor are rated at 1000 CFM, but the filter, depending on the filtration size is probably going to reduce it to around 800 CFM. Because I don't build spray booths on a daily basis I have no idea what kind of CFM rating your fan will need, but you could look at different manufacturers and see what kind of specs their booths have to determine what you should shoot for after you figure out how large of an area you're working with and the design of the hood you use.

Hope my rambling made some sense, I'd be glad to help out with any other questions you have if I can!
 
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