Ausflog. This will take some time.

ausf

Needle-chuck Ninja
Tired of dots and daggers, I decided to jump on in. I did my first airbrush painting.

Not my first painting mind you, but my first with an airbrush. I'm a lot handier with graphite, eraser and a tortillion. A lot harder than I thought it would be. I give you peeps even more props than ever after trying it for myself.

Made so many mistakes, the worst being the paint saturation got away from me quickly. A few Windex wipe offs to get this done. I was transferring paint from the shields, my fingers, everything it seemed. A general mess.

Plus I did myself zero favors with the subject choice, both in angle and general lack of texture. I thought it would be a breeze, just some eyes and hint of a nose and a mouth. Too much empty space for the lack of control I had. But all in all it was a heck of a learning experience. About 3 hours, I'm not going to finish the rest of the background or the hands. Calling it.

Micron Takumi, CI Black reduced by 50% with distilled, Terra Slate paper and few different homemade Cricut/Mylar shields.

Dorothy Lamour from a photo in the New York Times recently.



IMG_1058.JPG
 
Are you saying this is your first try? WOW!
The eyes and the hair really caught my attention. It looks great to me!
I am about a light year behind from doing something like that...
 
learning any new tool can be 'fun' and once your confidence grows so will your abilities. You're already ahead of many here who have zero experience with anything art/drawing related (like me)

I find the new CI to be extremely thin and it blows out and spiders easily. Have you tried it straight from the bottle (after shaking well and straining )
 
Are you saying this is your first try? WOW!
The eyes and the hair really caught my attention. It looks great to me!
I am about a light year behind from doing something like that...
Thanks.

First time airbrushing a painting, not the first time with an airbrush or the first time doing a portrait. Recreating what I see has always been easy to me, doing something original is the hard part.
 
learning any new tool can be 'fun' and once your confidence grows so will your abilities. You're already ahead of many here who have zero experience with anything art/drawing related (like me)

I find the new CI to be extremely thin and it blows out and spiders easily. Have you tried it straight from the bottle (after shaking well and straining )
I use a vortex mixer.

Straight from the bottle would buildup even faster. I'm thinking about reducing more actually.
 
I use a vortex mixer.

Straight from the bottle would buildup even faster. I'm thinking about reducing more actually.
Vortex is great if the paint hasn’t been sitting too long and thickened at the bottom, I use a metal paint stirrer when I first begin a session then the vortex prior to using it.
If you’re finding you go too dark too quickly (VERY common when first starting out) then practise trigger technique and don’t pull so far back on the trigger or use the correct transparent base for the line of Createx you are using (Illustration and detail use different binders) think of it as colorless paint so you’d then add reducer accordingly, the end consistency should be like milk.
I love transparent base and it’s often overlooked.

Using water to reduce delays drying which is why you’re getting paint transfer so easily, the terraslate isn’t absorbent so your water reducer will just sit on top and take ages to dry, it can be assisted with blowing air from the airbrush from a distance or you’ll just push the wet paint around.
The appropriate reducer on synthetic paper is better. Water on an absorbent surface is fine but it will still take longer to dry
 
you can also use transparent base to reduce opacity in addition to thinning with water. You get the best of both worlds, with more transparency to the paint, while being able to adjust consistency for spraying.
Thanks Dave (me not my wallet).

Off to Spraygunner for some transparent base and probably a dozen other things...
 
black paint for a monochrome portrait is easier to control if you use a 20/80 mix 20 drops paint to 80 drops transparent base
Thanks for that. I have some on the way.

Mainly for another tool to use, I don't think I'll be doing many portraits with the airbrush, this was just familiar territory for me. A safe space to try my hand at an airbrush only work.

I'm really drawn to HR Giger, Frazetta and WWII nose art like Elvgren and Vargas which will be my goals. I also love 50s B sci-fi movie one sheets that I want to try my hand at.

I can do the monochromatic stuff in a third the time with a Derwent 4B pencil and a blender on plain paper.IMG_0264.JPG
 
you can also use transparent base to reduce opacity in addition to thinning with water. You get the best of both worlds, with more transparency to the paint, while being able to adjust consistency for spraying.
I forgot to mention Dave, thanks for the Terraslate tip.

I really like it. I was able to erase, wipe it clean and scratch the hairs without issue (just a little debris). The yup I tried really couldn't handle the scratching.

I'm set to try one of the box kits from Blair with his paper, the Terraslate and dowel didn't work that well for me, at least not like it does in his video.
 
Vortex is great if the paint hasn’t been sitting too long and thickened at the bottom, I use a metal paint stirrer when I first begin a session then the vortex prior to using it.
If you’re finding you go too dark too quickly (VERY common when first starting out) then practise trigger technique and don’t pull so far back on the trigger or use the correct transparent base for the line of Createx you are using (Illustration and detail use different binders) think of it as colorless paint so you’d then add reducer accordingly, the end consistency should be like milk.
I love transparent base and it’s often overlooked.

Using water to reduce delays drying which is why you’re getting paint transfer so easily, the terraslate isn’t absorbent so your water reducer will just sit on top and take ages to dry, it can be assisted with blowing air from the airbrush from a distance or you’ll just push the wet paint around.
The appropriate reducer on synthetic paper is better. Water on an absorbent surface is fine but it will still take longer to dry
I thought I replied to this Jack, sorry.

Great info. I actually for the first time in my life used the needle limiter, set to nearly zero so couldn't apply too much paint (at least I thought so) and held the brush way back from the paper. But not really getting my aim down or having a steady enough hand it still was what I'd refer to as blotchy.

I have trans base en route. maybe I'll pick this up again when I get it.
 
I forgot to mention Dave, thanks for the Terraslate tip.

I really like it. I was able to erase, wipe it clean and scratch the hairs without issue (just a little debris). The yup I tried really couldn't handle the scratching.

I'm set to try one of the box kits from Blair with his paper, the Terraslate and dowel didn't work that well for me, at least not like it does in his video.
The Blair paper is a little different. It is a bit brighter, as well as being a little more tolerant to being really abused. The "tooth" on Terraslate can be a bit aggressive - I even use colored pencils on it with pretty fair results as long as you don't try to build too many layers... not so with the Blair, but that isn't what it was made for.
 
The Blair paper is a little different. It is a bit brighter, as well as being a little more tolerant to being really abused. The "tooth" on Terraslate can be a bit aggressive - I even use colored pencils on it with pretty fair results as long as you don't try to build too many layers... not so with the Blair, but that isn't what it was made for.
I thought I was going to get away with a Prismacolor verythin black on the eyelash tips but it wouldn't grab. I assumed I'd just wait for a gessoed surface.

Like I said, this was just a 'jump in' trial. I could have easily just cut some frisket or made a stencil with eyelash openings, but opted for just spraying on the edge of a circle stencil and using a sand eraser.
 
I thought I was going to get away with a Prismacolor verythin black on the eyelash tips but it wouldn't grab. I assumed I'd just wait for a gessoed surface.

Like I said, this was just a 'jump in' trial. I could have easily just cut some frisket or made a stencil with eyelash openings, but opted for just spraying on the edge of a circle stencil and using a sand eraser.
The more you experiment the better, many things are helpful in getting an end result
 
Your first airbrush portrait? A more than good work 🥰 How long have you been holding an airbrush?
Thanks.

Since '82, but then only for effects work like latex masks and skin textures. Around 2000 I started building models again (from early childhood). All with the same HP-BC2 until I guess about 7 or 8 years ago when I got an AH and TH. Then the floodgates opened.

But I've wanted to do illustration work since 70s when I first saw Giger's work. This is just a recent thing for me, past few months really of trying out different surfaces, brushes, paints. I'm not stranger to portraits, but that would be in graphite, oil or acrylic, never sprayed. I guess its a late mid life crisis. Kids finished college and sorted themselves out, heading towards retiring so it's me time.

I used to paint dungaree jackets back in the 70s-80s, so imitating what I see is easy for me. Not really interested in doing portraits, it was just a safe space for me to try something besides exercises. I'm done with dots and daggers, I'll learn on the fly from now on.
 
Wow Giger had an asteroid named after him. He moved to pastels, inks and markers after airbrushing for years. An amazing artist, I hope you will share what you enjoy creating 🙏
 
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