Bristol Board - Any Pre-prep required?

V-Twin

Triple Actioner
As per the heading. I have a wad/booklet of Daler Rowney A4 250g/m2 Bristol Board and am wondering
if any pre-prep is required on it before laying paint down (I'm guessing not, but it won't hurt to ask!)

I have not used this stuff before, and as i have had it for a couple years now I thought it's about time to
try some and also see if I can scratch/rub out my Com-Art paint on it, which I have not been able to do
up to now on anything I have used to date (Stretched Canvas, loose Canvas sheet, Canvas Board, Water colour
paper, Acrylic paper).

I have an idea of what I want to paint on this as a test, the picture being a 57-Chevvy with the de-rigure flames
on the bonnet and wheel arches or I might do one of a model care I made when I was 14-ish and entered into
a competition (Ford Capri, painted Gloss Black body and Matt Black roof and home made sidewinder pipes
with a Goats head [faceing you] on the bonnet and flames coming off its horns and wheel arches. I named
it 'Flame Freak')

Thanks
 
The Bristol board may take a little erasing/scratching, but not a lot, the paint will also be absorbed quite quick, so that will hinder erasing too.

If You want to use erasing then I highly recommend a few coats of gesso first

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As kingpin mentioned, Gesso will be a big help when scratching and erasing. Keep in mind that when erasing (especially with very thinned paints) that the paints will soak into the Gesso if sprayed too heavy. Take you're time and use lots of layers.
 
The Bristol board may take a little erasing/scratching, but not a lot, the paint will also be absorbed quite quick, so that will hinder erasing too.

If You want to use erasing then I highly recommend a few coats of gesso first

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Thanks Ian, I have seen that video before, and it did surprise me that you can gesso paper, what about it bending then cracking?

I think I will try the Bristol Board Au-Naturel first and see how I get on with that. I won't be doing this
immediately as I have my grandsons McLaren F1 triptych to do first, and that I fear will take quite some time to accomplish.

I thought that a lot of artists used Bristol Board, and I do recall some on here many years ago noting they used it.
But it may now have fallen out of favour I guess. The Schoelhammer G4 stuff was expensive and I thought too good a stuff
for me when I first picked up an airbrush, thus would get wasted.

Oh and I have a pad of Yupo to use yet too, again had it couple years but never touched it.

So, thanks for the info, much appreciated.
 
Thats the best bet, give it a go and see how you get on, personally I love using gessoed paper/card, You can get away with using cheaper paper too, but cheap watercolour paper should work fine, I havent experienced any problems using it.

Yupo is a totally different beast< VERY easy to remove paint from it until the paint has properly cured! Try them both and see how You get on. And dont forget to post pics of your findings šŸ˜ :thumbsup:
 
I tried some Bristol board a few years ago, and was very surprised just how much paint the paper would absorb. I had a hard time getting the dark's to look dark, and many of the colors just looked washed out. I tried applying a clear coat to seal the surface, but even with a generous coating I still had a problem with the colors washing out.

Nothing to loose trying to see if it will work for you, the way that you work. Sometimes when you gesso (if you do get to that process) the paper/board may warp. I will often also gasso the back to get it to even/flatten back out...
 
Thanks Ian and Dave, good info there. I will have a go at both, plain and gessoed board and as you say, see how they go.
And, think I will have a go at gessoing a sheet of Water Colour paper too, (messy times ahead).

I'm gonna have to do some dots/dagger practice too, as I have found I was having a few 'skill' issues with this damn
WH40K Ork. I really have gone back several steps from where I was at prior to the 'hiatus'.
 
Thanks Ian and Dave, good info there. I will have a go at both, plain and gessoed board and as you say, see how they go.
And, think I will have a go at gessoing a sheet of Water Colour paper too, (messy times ahead).

I'm gonna have to do some dots/dagger practice too, as I have found I was having a few 'skill' issues with this damn
WH40K Ork. I really have gone back several steps from where I was at prior to the 'hiatus'.
it will come back to you. All of a sudden you will realize you re not trying anymore, just doing.
 
OH I really hope so, and quickly. I Started out enjoying the painting again, but as time has worn on,
I kept going backwards and forwards pushing and pulling brighter parts and shaded areas over and over.
Now just about done, with only the background to finish.

I also noticed that I was not double-actioning properly either. I kept taking the air off between each stroke.
 
OH I really hope so, and quickly. I Started out enjoying the painting again, but as time has worn on,
I kept going backwards and forwards pushing and pulling brighter parts and shaded areas over and over.
Now just about done, with only the background to finish.

I also noticed that I was not double-actioning properly either. I kept taking the air off between each stroke.
It all about muscle memory. A few minutes of practice each day will have your muscles recalling what they are supposed to do. It is also natural for us to doubt ourselves - ALL the time ;) . Just keep moving forward, you got this!
 
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