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Can you control air pressure by trigger?,

Discussion in 'How to Control an Airbrush' started by Than, Jul 31, 2019.


  1. Than

    Than Young Tutorling

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    I heard someone told that. He can control air pressure by pressing on trigger. If he want light air flow, he press trigger little bit. I think it isn’t comfort. Then I adjust a valve on compressor. What do you think about this?
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  2. DaveG

    DaveG Detail Decepticon! Very Likeable!

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    I usually do this - control air pressure with my trigger. Not on every brush, but on many of them I can get away with doing it. There are easier ways to do it, however. A MAC valve with a quick connect is probably the easiest.

    Getting back to the trigger thing - some brushes just do not lend themselves to it. The trigger operates like an on/off switch with nothing in between. The Badger for instance, has a very short throw, with a fairly stiff, tiny spring. I modify mine, and use a longer, softer spring, so I have a little wiggle room there. Most Japanese brushes respond well to a trigger spring softening that allows a quite good feel of the trigger if you look for it. There are more... Most people don't bother - they mash the trigger, and carry on.
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  3. basepaint

    basepaint Air-Valve Autobot! Very Likeable!

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    Like what Dave said the trigger is an on off type trigger if you try to use it as anything but that your looking for trouble as you won't be able to tell how much pressure your using from one trigger pull to the next and one or two pounds of pressure will make a difference in the spray patterns from the nozzle so you get different sized lines/spray
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  4. JackEb

    JackEb The Dragon Hunter Staff Member Admin

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    I have tried, unsuccessfully.
    Its much easier to use the MAC valve on the airbrush hose than to keep resetting the compressor regulator
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  5. Robbyrockett2

    Robbyrockett2 Air-Valve Autobot! Very Likeable!

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    I do it, not on purpose usually...just find myself doing it. Would I intentionally learn to do it that way?....probably not. I think its just a matter of personal tendencies.
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  6. AndreZA

    AndreZA Elite Member! Elite Member! Very Likeable!

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    It takes a lot of skill to do that. Pressing down a fraction and then swing the trigger back keeping the arc the same. Serious skill. I stick to an mac valve.
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  7. Nessus

    Nessus Gravity Guru

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    I used to think one was supposed to do this back when I started airbrushing. And for along time after, actually. Didn't have access to people I could Q&A with, so bad info could stick around if it wasn't explicitly mentioned in the stuff I found to read.

    Based on that experience, Id say the same as others here: it's technically possible, but the margin for control is so fine (because of the tiny travel of the air valve) that it's extremely difficult. Back when I used to do this, I had to use a non-standard grip to do so. Basically the only way to control the super fine increments of valve pressure was for me to pinch the trigger between thumb and index finger. Trying to do this again now, I find I can't because all my brushes I actually use have soft springs now, so there's no tactile feedback to help me find and hold a given position.

    In practice it overcomplicates your finger technique and acts as a stumbling block to slow down learning. In theory one could design an airbrush to be used this way, but normal airbrushes aren't, so the difficulty is so high that it's not worth it. A mac valve or benchtop regulator will give you much better control.

    TBH, as I've gotten more experienced, I've found there isn't a need for that sort of thing anyway. If I've got things reduced and dialed in for fine lines, I can still do broad strokes, just with maybe extra passes. And if I can't, it's usually changing reduction rather than pressure that makes the better difference. I rarely fiddle with pressure once I've got my start-of-session calibration over with, and I have no idea what others are doing or why that they feel they need this ability.
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2019
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  8. jord001

    jord001 Air-Valve Autobot!

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    On one of my super 63's the trigger is quite stiff and I can do it with that but other airbrushes I would say no, its too hit and miss plus I have soft springs in so pretty much instantly on. I use an inline mac valve to control my pressure which works extremely well.

    Lee
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