Cheap airburshes

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Mark

Guest
http://www.chuckbauman.com/airbrushes-free-airbrush-reviews.htm

He sure seems to like these, and I am looking for a second brush, but I never take one man's word for anything in a purchase. I know the old addage you get what you pay for, but I also have a 14 dollar chinese 4 inch angle grinder that kept on working when two brand new big names burned up.

Anyone else have an opinion?
 
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ad fez

Guest
I had one which worked fine as a beginners brush for me, once your a bit more talented then you just use it for background.I suppose if you are a bit unlucky you could get one totally unsuitable, but for what you pay for them its surely worth the risk.as I say, mine was fine as background and detail beginners brush until I dropped it at least
 
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Madbrush

Guest
http://www.chuckbauman.com/airbrushes-free-airbrush-reviews.htm

He sure seems to like these, and I am looking for a second brush, but I never take one man's word for anything in a purchase. I know the old addage you get what you pay for, but I also have a 14 dollar chinese 4 inch angle grinder that kept on working when two brand new big names burned up.

Anyone else have an opinion?

I have this same brush and it does the job, it does need more frequent care and attention, but I learned from friend who also has it that it is useless for urithanes, and not just because of the seals but the thinners cause it to corrode internally blowing out loose nickel practicals, however for health reasons I can't use urithanes so for me it's never been a problem, everything in my gallery except the snake is done with the same tool.
 
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Stranger375

Guest
I got such a Veda 180 Model. I bought mine from a german airbrush shop that sells them with their label printed on them, but on the box it was stated as BD 180.
It´s a clone of the Iwata Micron airbrush, but dont expect it to be built the same way for the price lol. I seen they are sold with different nozzles from 0.2 to 0.35mm.
Mine has a 0.25mm setup and it works pretty good for the money, and im able to get very fine details with that airbrush. Before i used it the 1st time i did some things.
The needle was kinda sticky and not polished, so i used a scotch brite and polished the needle abit and it was really smooth after that. The whole airbrush i took apart
and lubed it up like in Mitch´s video how to maintain an airbrush.
 

RebelAir

Air-Valve Autobot!
Hit and miss with cheap brushes, some work great, some are rusted up just from the boat ride..If you can afford there are quite a few good brands that do sell cheaper alternatives so personally I would go with a known name if ya could afford to do so..Or buy at least 3 cheap ones so you at least will get one good one and spares for it :)
 

JTairbrush

Gravity Guru
First off, don't listen to anything Chuck Bauman has to say. Here in the U.S., he's not recognized as a very ethical person in the world of airbrushing. He ripped off Mike Lavalle's True Fire Stencils and tries to state that these shapes can't be trademarked. The airbrushes he's referring to are made by Fengda in China. A lot of sellers do rebrand the Fengda airbrushes such as TCP Global here in the U.S. I can't speak for Iwata (but highly doubt Fengda makes Iwata parts), but as for Badger, they manufacture everything themselves here in the U.S. You can see the Fengda airbrushes at Fengdaairbrush.com
Personally, I believe you get what you pay for and these Chinese knock off's have inferior fit, finish and don't work nearly as good as Iwata or Badger. Just my 2 cents.
 
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military.modeller80

Guest
Hi

I have had a few of these VEDA airbrushes and can vouch for them being quite usable, especially the 180, I know quite a few people that have bought them after I recommended them and every one of them has been more than happy with the results. They obviously are not built to Iwata quality but they are a fraction of the Iwata price so why would anyone expect it to be as good as a brush costing so much more. With the current selling price of around £18.99 to the UK they still represent a good introduction to the fine art of airbrushing. and then when you do want to upgrade you can buy yourself a nice Harder & Steenbeck because they have never been cloned by the Chinese. There can be nothing worse than spending £300 plus on an Iwata Custom Micron only for people to think you are using a £20 knock off and the H&S brushes do look like a quality item, Unlike the Iwatas which just look like all them cheap knock offs :)

Paul (an Iwata user)
 
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surrealise

Guest
I use made in china airbrush (fengda bd 211) for about a month. Well, it is my first and i dont have any else to compare with, but after i tried to paint with that cheapee I realised i am in love with airbrushing! People say well known, expensive airbrushes painting quality is uncompareble with "made in china". I hope so! I believe I will try any of expensive airbrushes as soon as possible. Especialy i'd like to try that one: Harder & Steenbeck, Infinity, Infinity Crplus, Infinity Meinrad Froschin Edition
 

Strictly Attitude

Air-Valve Autobot!
OK first off own all of the brushes in question here badger infinity iwata eclipse micron high line even just got a iwata high performance plus for my birthday two days ago returning it because it's a suction feed and will probably buy a high line b with the money. In fact the ups guy just knocked on my door to pick it up. The chinese brush works ok allot of problems and allot of tuning to get it to do what I want where as my iwata or infiniti or even badger or pashe they run and I am not going to fight against my equipment. If you are on a budget and want super detail get a renegade. you want a nice all around brush get an eclipse eclipse or even a talon, forgot to mention the harder steenbeck evolution nice brush cause you can upgrade it to infinity specs. All these are around $100 us. If you are sure your hooked and can throw the cash don't want to shovel out micron money yet the $200 range Harder steenbeck infinity solo amazing brush and will pull crazy detail any iwata high line or high performance plus too. after that you have the infinity 2 in1 and then the micron and the grapho line is nice too. Saying that when I go to paint what do I grab when I go paint usually the first airbrushs loaded up for me are the infinity and the iwata high line those are my work horses.
 
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rick

Guest
yes they might keep working for the price, BUT they will never paint the brand name lines. u just cant go cheap on this. i used a chinese for a year, when i got the hp c+ it was so good.

but learning off the chinese bad technique cost me alot of time, and i got back to the start.

dont do it, maybe fun to try out, but if u keep going: buy a brand, badger or iawata are rock hard brushes.
 
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btreize

Guest
Hi everyone. first post here and i have been browsing the forum during the last two weeks.
I myself was about to buy the WD-180 and the price is very attractive. I read over and over and decided to get a known branded one where parts will be available for years to come and someone standing behind the product.
So during this week i should receive the Paasche Talon TG set and a Neo for Iwata. Just hope i did a good choice for my limited budget.
 
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Stranger375

Guest
Hi everyone. first post here and i have been browsing the forum during the last two weeks.
I myself was about to buy the WD-180 and the price is very attractive. I read over and over and decided to get a known branded one where parts will be available for years to come and someone standing behind the product.
So during this week i should receive the Paasche Talon TG set and a Neo for Iwata. Just hope i did a good choice for my limited budget.

Hi and welcome to the forum. I can´t say anything about the Talon, but the Neo is a pretty good airbrush for the money. I also started out with a Neo and loved it.
 

Strictly Attitude

Air-Valve Autobot!
Congrats on your new purchase you should be pleased with what you bought. You can upgrade that talon by buying a head set from the mojo 3 from mike learn. I have been wanting to do this to mine but haven't had the chance.
 
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Visualfury

Guest
I just received my Veda 180 in the mail today. After playing with it for a bit I decided that if you are on a very tight budget and just starting out, its not that bad of a brush. Definitely not quality made.
There is no precision in this brushes manufacturing. The threads don't fit well, on mine you can actually just pull the spring assembly out with a good tug, and the nozzle took a bit of adjusting to sit square in the cap.
I did get it to shoot pretty good after a few tweaks but I doubt I will ever really use it much. It did come with a quick connect coupler, a .2mm needle installed and an alternate .3mm needle/nozzle included with the brush.
In the end I would recommend spending that extra money to buy a name brand just for the quality and peace of mind.
Although personally I am glad I made the purchase. My space looks better with more airbrushes in it. :welcoming:
 
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Squishy

Queen Clown Slayer
You can't paint a Rembrandt with a whitewashing brush, yes it will put paint where you want it, but not with precision and control for detail. On the other hand you can't run before you can walk, so getting a super duper brush will not produce super duper work if the hand holding it hasn't mastered it. Buy the best named brush you can afford (people prefer different brands for different reasons, after trying a couple I chose Iwata) that will be accurate and reliable enough to learn the craft. Look at the entry level brush of a particular brand, it will be 100 times better than a cheap copy, and then if you can afford it buy the next one up. You learn quickly at the start and will be ready to do more complicated work in a fairly short time if you practise religiously and put the time in, and I think you may wish you had bought the better brush to start off with if you just get the entry level one. ( But it's not necessary, just my opinion). You will learn better if your brush is working for you rather than against you, and you will not have to wonder if it is your technique or your brush is letting you down, or holding you back.
 
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