Choosing an airbrush.

A

AZjar

Guest
I am looking at getting a new airbrush. I have a cheap master series that is only a week old and just won't do anything right. Iv researched plenty and have ask a thousand questions but just can't get it working properly and tcp global won't take it back just because it's used.

I am a bit restricted with money but I have come across a couple of airbrushes that I'm interested in. I was hoping some of you may have used them or currently use them.

I should start with saying again that I am new and my goal is to do portraits with an airbrush.

The Badger Renegade velocity jet, it's not a bad price and the video reviews I have seen show it can do pretty detailed work. Is this a good airbrush for an aspiring artist to begin with? Is it easy to clean, keep clean?

The Patriot 105. Also a good price. I like the .5mm needle nozzle it will keep me from bending the tip and the floating nozzle seems it could make life easier. Some reviews show even though it has a larger needle it can still do some fine detail. Once I start learning better control will I quickly find my self wanting a smaller needle or will it do what I need it too?

If you have any other recommendations for me I would love to hear them!!
 
Either would be a good choice. But for a week old beginner I would go patriot. The smaller nozzle in the velocity will be harder to get used to and learn with. The patriot is more forgiving. You can also purchase a .3 mm conversion set, called the superfine, this will give you flexibility with one airbrush.


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Either would be a good choice. But for a week old beginner I would go patriot. The smaller nozzle in the velocity will be harder to get used to and learn with. The patriot is more forgiving. You can also purchase a .3 mm conversion set, called the superfine, this will give you flexibility with one airbrush.


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Yeah, what he said. I love my Patriot. It's cheap, easy to maintain, and reliable.
I have the .5(default) and the .75 setup for it. Never got the superfine because I already have 3 detail brushes.

On a side note: My Avatar was painted with the Patriot .5 setup.
 
Here is a pic of what the Patriot is capable with the .75mm setup(it comes with the .5mm).

ry4ezy6y.jpg
 
Thanks all!!
I have been leaning toward the Patriot. Thanks for the pics showing how fine you can get the lines with it. You all helped a lot thank you!
 
AZ please dont think that you will be able to pull lines like Jeff is showing right off. Even with a high priced detail gun.. It take a LOT of practice , technique and knowledge to get there
That being said HAVE FUN it will happen
 
AZ please dont think that you will be able to pull lines like Jeff is showing right off. Even with a high priced detail gun.. It take a LOT of practice , technique and knowledge to get there
That being said HAVE FUN it will happen

KO is right. It takes many(maybe hundreds) of hours of practice to get good trigger control. I practice drills and detail work more than I paint actual paintings. I spend around an hour a night on average practicing. Pulling fine lines requires a combination of good paint, spot on reduction and the right psi setting for the brush you are using.
 
KO is right. It takes many(maybe hundreds) of hours of practice to get good trigger control. I practice drills and detail work more than I paint actual paintings. I spend around an hour a night on average practicing. Pulling fine lines requires a combination of good paint, spot on reduction and the right psi setting for the brush you are using.
That' what I should be doing lol!
 
Understood! I will practice as often as I can! And take my time learning how to control the AB.
Using the patriot, do any of you have paint recommendations? Preferably water based as I am airbrushing in my apartment and don't want bad fumes. Also if there not reduced already, what's the best reducer for them? I have just been practicing on paper towels is that a good medium or should I be practicing on something that doesn't absorb most of the paint? Again thank you all!
 
I am learning also and I am using Badger's brand water base. The first part is learning reduction/air pressure. Or no reduction and air pressure. I am not sure where your located but I would highly recommend whatever you can get your hands on easily. I am in the US so Michael's craft stores are easy enough to get to and they carry Badger's brand water based AB paint. Makes it easy to since you can just use water to reduce.

As far as practicing. I use regular printer paper. Paper towels are super absorbent and if you are prcticing with building up your colors and contrast you'll likely blow a hole through your piece. Printer paper seems to be a good middle of the road. It absorbs the paint but still gives a second to wipe an "oh crap" off and better help for when you/ I build up to sealed hard surfaces.
 
Understood! I will practice as often as I can! And take my time learning how to control the AB.
Using the patriot, do any of you have paint recommendations? Preferably water based as I am airbrushing in my apartment and don't want bad fumes. Also if there not reduced already, what's the best reducer for them? I have just been practicing on paper towels is that a good medium or should I be practicing on something that doesn't absorb most of the paint? Again thank you all!

What I use for paintings are ETAC EFX and Createx Illustration. They are a bit too expensive for practice drills.
Com-Art is a cheap high quality paint and sprays well with minimum reduction, my preferred practice drill paint is Spectra Tex. It is made by Badger sprays relatively well out of the bottle too, but not as good as Com-Art for illustration work.

The only paint meant for airbrushes that I would stay away from for learning is the Standard old formula Createx, It was formulated for textile painting and is very thick. It doesn't help your learning curve in my opinion. I struggled with it for a while when I first got back into airbrushing, but now I can use it without issue.
 
sounds like an interesting question
If a tree falls down and there is no one there to hear it, does it still make a sound? That's an interesting question about sounds. With regards to waterbased paint I like Wicked, as it is a great all rounder that can be used on many surfaces. However if you already know you want to specialise in portraits then Illustration, Com art, or E'tac might be the way to go. It isn't the cheapest, but you only have to buy one colour to start painting, so you could just get some sepia to begin with. It might be an idea to start as you meann to go on, and get used to he paint you will want to be using as they all have slightly dfferent qualities. Having said that, whatever you can easily get hold of is alwaysa good option, as it can be frustrating if you run out and have to order online.
 
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