Choosing the right paint?

Z

ZJOmega

Guest
I'm relatively new to airbrushing and my question is. If I am painting on finer/high quality paper, what would be the best type of paint to use for the best results? I currently own Wicked, Createx, and Wicked bloodline colors. Is there better types or brands out there for my projects? In addition I also paint on poster boards and canvas from time to time.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Zack
 
Createx illustration (bloodline) is one of the better "fine art" paints araound and perfectly suited for the surfaces you mention.

The question "is there a better brand" can't be answered. Some paints are more suited for specific surfaces (regular createx for clothing for instance) but almost all airbrush paints will work on board/paper. Which is the best brand is very personal what one swears by might be cursed at by another.

In general it mostly amounts to finding the paint that suits your needs/methods best the only advice I can give is get a bottle of the most common brands and give them a try. You'll notice they all requier different amounts of reduction and all have their own "quirks", the only way to find which is "best" is finding out which one works best for you.

Most commonly used brands for paper/canvas/board:
-Wicked
-Createx illustration
-Com-art
-Schmincke
-E'tac (EFX)
-Golden

The only thing I can say for certain and with which most will agree is don't use regular createx :p
 
I love Wicked, but it is an all round multisurface paint. I use it on fine paper, but if you are specialising in the portrait/ fine art area others may be more suited.
I can only repeat what haasje says and give a few brands a try. You might try contacting a few suppliers as you may be able to ask for samples.
 
What these guys said. I use golden and have tried a bit of schminke. Both are good but I need to play more with schminke as is is different to erase than the golden. With Golden make sure it is High Flow.
 
As with the others, i like Etac efx the most but have others that i use, its all down to preference.

lee
 
this is one of those loaded questions LOL, the best paint is the paint you find the best LOL. Some prefer this brand or that brand and the ones being mentioned are all good paints, sometimes it depends on your environment more so than substrate but that can also come into play. The cleanest spraying paints are in fact uro's and suffer less tip dry than any other waterbased paint, but not everyone can use such due to where they paint and prob not the best for some substrates. But substrates can be changed pretty easily. Your using already a good paint choice but like any airbrush, changing paints requires learning that new paints in and outs, sometimes it is better to stick with one type for awhile to learn how to best use it as each have their own quirks, strengths or weakness but def no harm in trying out a few to see what you instantly feel gratified with..Good luck.

PS Standard createx is a good paint for the right purpose and the go to paint for TShirt Art, but useless as Haasje said for anything else.
 
I also seem to have a hell of a time thinning the paint to flow properly most of the time, is there some type or recipe for this? It can be quite frustrating when I'm be painting smoothly for five minutes, add some paint to the cup, add some reducer, then start getting tip dry and clogs lol.
 
Unfortunately there is no standard recipe, there are just too many variables involved.

However, if you are using Wicked you really have to use the 4012 reducer to get the best out of it. It will help with flow, but also with tip dry, curing, anti fish eyes, quicker drying and possibly a few other things I've forgotten. This is great for a multi surface paint. The down side is if you want to use scratching and erasing techniques you pretty much need to do so right away. Wicked has a mild solvent in which does not work well if using water or another type of reducer.

But when you get your ratios right tip dry becomes pretty much negligable. I only clear my tip maybe once or twice an hour.

In my .35 eclipse I use 3 drops reducer to one drop paint as my base mix and have my pressure set to around 20 psi. For black and white I would probably use an extra drop, then if conditions are hot or humid maybe a bit more, or less if cooler. Some of the detail colours need very little reduction particularly yellow.

If you are using a larger or smaller nozzle then you would need to adjust for that. If using my .23 micron I might start out at 10 to 1 with very low pressure for super tight lines.

Hopefully this will give you an idea, but basically you need to be very methodical to begin with, and do lots of testing. Add a drop of reducer, do a test spray etc until you get the flow you're looking for. Larger areas should have a satin smooth look with no graininess and lines should be crisp with no skipping or spidering. More reducer = less air as a rule of thumb, but graininess could be a sign of too little air, and spidering too much.

You actually use very little paint, so I recommend buying the large bottle of 4012 reducer, as you will use a lot, plus it is really good to use to clean and flush your airbrush. No other cleaners needed.

It seems a bit daunting and is a bit frustrating, but once you've got it, it becomes second nature very quickly. So keep experimenting and good luck.
 
Wow thank you so much, I have watched many videos discussing what you just explained! Needless to say you gave the easiest and most understandable explanation so far. Thank you so much for taking the time to write that out for me. I will keep all of that in mind.
 
No worries, we've all been there, and I couldn't understand when I first started out why someone couldn't just say 'x' amount of this to 'x' amount of this at 'x'psi. Or thought there was something I was missing. Plus it's confusing when you're looking at say a t.shirt guy, thinking why can't I do that nice thick black line, not realising they have large nozzles, and are spraying at 60psi. It's hard to find what's suitable without getting confused - or it was for me lol

To be honest some find Wicked to be one of the trickier paints to learn, others love it and I found it suits me down to the ground. It has a heavier amount of pigment than some other paints, which gives it its great colour and makes it so versatile for so many surfaces, and great for auto work. It's the heavier amount of pigment that means you need to get those reductions sorted. Other brands work well with just water, or need little reduction But I like the fact that I use the 4012 reducer because it has so many other properties like flow aid, tip dry reduction, quicker drying etc.

I find it works really well on surfaces like paper, board and clay board, but as Wicked is an all rounder, other paints are more specialised for that area. I think probably E'tac fx, and createx illustration and com-art in particular. I just like that I have a one line does all paint. But that is why people are suggesting you try a few (asking for samples is how I did that, I didn't get them all, but I got a few) , because what works for one, and one person swears by, isn't the one for someone else. Good luck with it, and let us know how you get one, and if you do try some other paints maybe do a little compare and contrast post, I'm sure it would be a big help to other newbies :)
 
No worries, we've all been there, and I couldn't understand when I first started out why someone couldn't just say 'x' amount of this to 'x' amount of this at 'x'psi. Or thought there was something I was missing. Plus it's confusing when you're looking at say a t.shirt guy, thinking why can't I do that nice thick black line, not realising they have large nozzles, and are spraying at 60psi. It's hard to find what's suitable without getting confused - or it was for me lol

Thats what makes it so fun :) You can walk in everyday to something new..
 
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