Clear coat Question

Y

Yams

Guest
I have been spraying a 2 part clear over my paint jobs and keep getting this same effect. I am using a Passache VL 1.3 mm tip at around 30 - 35 psi.

For some reason the clear gets this weird fuzzy look to it, is this just minor orange peel or something else. When I lay the wet coat down it looks very clear and glassy, but when it dries it starts to fuzz a bit.

I can always remedy the problem by scuffing it down and compounding it out so I don't think it is serious, but I would like to avoid this time consuming process.

I thin my clear down quite a bit 2 to 1, the clear is a 4 to 1 and I use a medium activator.

Can anyone help, here are a few pictures.

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Looks like orangepeel. It could also be an effect of humidity
 
It looks like it might be solvent pop. That occurs when the outer layer dries while there is still solvent trapped underneath. The solvent can't get out as it dries so it forms little bubbles under the dry outer layer. Sometimes these actually pop like a balloon and cause little craters. If it is the problem, it might be the extra solvent your using to over reduced it. Hard to tell for sure what it actually is.
 
Yes just watch your flash times between coats, follow the guidelines to the letter re times, and reduce the recommended amount. Hard to see in the pics but I think solvent pop too. If it was orange peel you'd see it sooner, and that is caused by the clear starting to dry before it hits the surface giving a rough speckled texture, this looks more like the tiny bubbles of pop.
 
Thank you for the responses, but could it still be solvent pop if it buffs out fairly easily? I thought solvent pop goes through the entire clear layer?

Also I was wondering if anyone has experience spraying 2k through an airbrush. How do you get a smooth no orange peel finish without buffing? I think my current issue is that I am thinning it down too much. I feel like I lay down good wetcoats without having runs, I just think with it being thinned so much as it dries the clear starts to gather to itself and produce orange peel.

I was also considering an HVLP to spray the clear, but only for the reasons that it would produce a better finish and not for speed of laying it down. Any thoughts on this as well :)
 
I would get the HVLP. Would seem to just be easier to lay down a nice coat all at once.

I was thinking about all of the nooks and crannies as well. Also when you say all at once, what do you mean? I know you can get a good fan on an HVLP, but how is that much different than the large tip airbrush on a small scale like this. It would be another investment for me, I was just hoping to be sure that I could be sure it would produce better results. Have you dealt with a project like this before?
 
I was thinking about all of the nooks and crannies as well. Also when you say all at once, what do you mean? I know you can get a good fan on an HVLP, but how is that much different than the large tip airbrush on a small scale like this. It would be another investment for me, I was just hoping to be sure that I could be sure it would produce better results. Have you dealt with a project like this before?
Shes painted everything drom 5x7 to a motorhome. Im pretty sure she has.
 
Also you can get a cheap mini hvlp and be ok. the folks who responded before me all do custom work.
 
Shes painted everything drom 5x7 to a motorhome. Im pretty sure she has.

I appreciate that, I just wasn't hearing that from her response. :)

This is kind of a bid deal for me and I am really just trying to pin this down. I was hoping someone could be a bit more personal. What do people use on scale models and the like, airbrush/hvlp and do they produce similar results? Do they always have to buff out op?
 
Also you can get a cheap mini hvlp and be ok. the folks who responded before me all do custom work.

Not to put you on the spot, but do you commonly get op in your work (if you do this kind of art), or can you spray fairly nicely?

I am just not sure if this is something that I just have to deal with or there is a real solution. It seems like one should be able to spray without op ):

BTW Thank you for the input :)
 
try a different gun...and see if it helps(if you have one to try)...could be alot of factors.....call that paint manufacture maybe you could get an email to them with the picture and they could pin it down quickly....when i troubleshoot something i start simple first(cause it usually is simple) and start eliminating till the solution is found....but like Meeshell said...follow manufactures directions to the "T" thats why they have R&D to keep from material failures...and lawsuits....i only know this from working for a industrial coatings company lol....
 
...could be alot of factors.....

Sorry about your neck! O:

I have prepping another project to spray the clear on and am first going to not thin it so much. Like everyone has been saying I think it is something simple. I was hoping to be able to stick with the paashe VL as I have several of them with parts etc, but I was looking at getting a finer gravity feed as well, not that it would help this situation.

How many people really spray clear right the first time without op, or having to sand and buff. I know if you really want it to snap you generally cut and buff, but is it possible to get that mirror finish without fixing issues?
 
Not to put you on the spot, but do you commonly get op in your work (if you do this kind of art), or can you spray fairly nicely?

I am just not sure if this is something that I just have to deal with or there is a real solution. It seems like one should be able to spray without op ):

BTW Thank you for the input :)
Thats a big tip your using, what size pieces are these? Im not sure exactly what yoir painting.. Im not the best at airbrushing i will freely admit, however ive clearcoated on a lot of stuff. My grandfather built boats, my dad built custom furniture. I Can spray small things with no orange peel, however most things will require buffing for a glass smooth finish.
 
I appreciate that, I just wasn't hearing that from her response. :)

This is kind of a bid deal for me and I am really just trying to pin this down. I was hoping someone could be a bit more personal. What do people use on scale models and the like, airbrush/hvlp and do they produce similar results? Do they always have to buff out op?
As for scale models, ive seen everything you can shake a stick at including future floor wax. Most scale models are too small to buff. Several guys here do rc planes and such.
 
As for scale models, ive seen everything you can shake a stick at including future floor wax. Most scale models are too small to buff. Several guys here do rc planes and such.

I have been able to achieve a glass smooth finish for the most part, I was just hoping I didn't have to cut and buff everytime. I am trying to minimize the time I spend on these controllers ):

Also I like the 2k because it is so hard and smooth when it dries, since the final product is handled a lot by hands.

Here is a link to some of my work for reference:

Facebook Gallery
 
Thats a big tip your using, what size pieces are these? Im not sure exactly what yoir painting.. Im not the best at airbrushing i will freely admit, however ive clearcoated on a lot of stuff. My grandfather built boats, my dad built custom furniture. I Can spray small things with no orange peel, however most things will require buffing for a glass smooth finish.


I am sorry I was thinking of an hvlp I was looking at, the tips that I have are 1.06, .73, .55. I use the 1.06 for clearing and the .55 for general painting. It is a Paasche VL Siphon feed
 
I have been able to achieve a glass smooth finish for the most part, I was just hoping I didn't have to cut and buff everytime. I am trying to minimize the time I spend on these controllers ):

Also I like the 2k because it is so hard and smooth when it dries, since the final product is handled a lot by hands.

Here is a link to some of my work for reference:

Facebook Gallery
Ahh controllers. Yeah mini hvlp might be too big, but would finish nicer, and be much less chanve of killing your brush.
 
Thank you for the responses, but could it still be solvent pop if it buffs out fairly easily? I thought solvent pop goes through the entire clear layer?

Also I was wondering if anyone has experience spraying 2k through an airbrush. How do you get a smooth no orange peel finish without buffing? I think my current issue is that I am thinning it down too much. I feel like I lay down good wetcoats without having runs, I just think with it being thinned so much as it dries the clear starts to gather to itself and produce orange peel.

I was also considering an HVLP to spray the clear, but only for the reasons that it would produce a better finish and not for speed of laying it down. Any thoughts on this as well :)
Hi Yams. It can be solvent pop and still buff out pretty east. In fact, unless it's pretty bad pop it is usually right at the top. I'm new to the AB, but I spray about a gallon of clear per day through regular spray equipment. The most important thing to remember about clear is that it doesn't dry like the color. It's actually a chemical reaction between the clear and hardener. Some clears are two part with some reducer already in one of the two parts. Some are three parts with the reducer being the third part. It's vary important to mix only as it says. If you change ratios, it will affect the final result. Maybe it will work out great, maybe it will be disastrous, you just don't know. It may look great, then peel off six months later. Having said that, the clear is usually thick and hard to spray so it's important to have something that will spray it well when it's mixed properly. If you try to thin it or otherwise alter it to make it work with what you have then the end result will be unpredictable at best. Usually with clear the faster you can get it on the better so it can flow together and lay out. A full size gun would work for even a small piece like that, but a mini hvlp would work even better in my opinion. Try to get the TDS, or technical data sheets for your clear and it will tell you exactly how to mix it and if you can cheat it a little. It will also tell you what gun setup and spray technique will work the best. Proper mix, gun setup, flash times and spray technique and you will get that finish you want. Clear can be cheated and be made to work in other guns and environments, but it is usually just something you have to experiment with to find out what works and what doesn't. It's usually not worth the time and trouble. Others have already done it and put it in the TDS.
 
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