Com-art vs Createx.

larz313

Gravity Guru
Yeah its me again. Just curious as to which paint would be best for portraits. Createx illustration or com-art. And why is com-art so much cheaper. Thanks.
 
In a nutshell createx can be clear coated and is more durable. Com art is basically just for illustrating on paper and canvas. In my area Com art is double expensive compared to createx illustration. A 1 Oz bottle of Com art at craft stores round here are over $10 a bottle and since you really don't need to reduce it, it goes really fast

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Both work great for it. I use Createx Illustration more, mostly because I am very comfortable with it. Createx Illustration can also be used for automotive/metal projects, it's very versatile. Com-Art has been around for a very long time. I've heard it said on the forum before, which makes sense because the manufacturing costs drop after years of production. Createx Illustration is only a few years old, so the price may possibly drop over time.
 
In a nutshell createx can be clear coated and is more durable. Com art is basically just for illustrating on paper and canvas. In my area Com art is double expensive compared to createx illustration. A 1 Oz bottle of Com art at craft stores round here are over $10 a bottle and since you really don't need to reduce it, it goes really fast

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Another note on what immortal mentioned. Com-Art is pre thinned for optimal performance, where the pigment density of CI is very dense. You have to thin it probably at least 1:1 or more, which makes your paints go a long way.
 
The little I've used Createx illustration I did not like it. Still way too much tip dry. I have no idea how Com-art will hold it's colour outside. I have used it on a hard surface and clear coated it without any problems. But that is for an object that will be used indoors. I still reduce it quite a bit even though they state it can be sprayed straight from the bottle.
 
I use com-art and think its good altho ive never used anything else to compare it to, as already mentioned above it can be reduced i have reduced upto 7:1



Ride the storm
 
nah larz..... horses for courses mate, keep the illustration for illustration, createx has other lines such as wicked and auto air if you are feeling fancy and want to work on metals and plastics etc..... like andreza said, i do find that the createx illustration tip dries.... (illustration less than wicked, and wicked less than standard createx) which is a real annoyance, thats why i (and i think also andreza) uses etac.... 1 its a great paint, flows nicely etc etc etc..... 2, very little tip dry and 3 it smells great
 
The little I've used Createx illustration I did not like it. Still way too much tip dry. I have no idea how Com-art will hold it's colour outside. I have used it on a hard surface and clear coated it without any problems. But that is for an object that will be used indoors. I still reduce it quite a bit even though they state it can be sprayed straight from the bottle.

Comart claims to be light fast. I did a quick spray on a hard hat and set it out side, so I guess I'll see in a bit.
 
Color portraits or monotone? A3 or smaller?

Full color A3 + - illustrations paints.

Smaller than A3 - Comarts.

Com-art, createx illustration and E-tac Fx are held in the same bracket/ paint types.
They are all 'lightfast'.
They can all be used for automotive applications.
They are designed for use through very fine airbrush assemblies. Out of the three the notably larger pigmented brand is createx illustration paint. The paint has a slightly faster drying time then the other two from what i've experienced, however i still find the flow really nice. If i need to cover a painting quickly in black, i would use createx over the other two types in a heartbeat. Generally for any base layers which i want to use an opaque color for, i'll use these.

Etac - i've only used one color unfortunately - however while the pigment size was comparable to that of com-art, i found it to dry slightly faster, it sprays beautifully, it smells great and it's easy to erase. Because it's easy to erase and re-wettable for illustration purposes, we know that it's not ideal for automotive purposes.

Com-art flows extremely nicely through the airbrush and i find few problems with it. The type of paint you use comes down to personal preference and the size of the artworks you do + how you build them up.
If you lay heavy bases and minor transparent work, then to get away with one set i'd go for illustration colours.
If you do mainly small artworks then i'd look at either e-tac or com-art for the finer spray pattern and slightly better detailing you can achieve without hassle.

I spoke to a com-art rep last year who explained to me that the idea of lightfastness went out the window years ago as the major brands moved to fully pigmented paint. I had heard that com-art wasn't lightfast.
No one can guarantee 100% lightfastness when the paint is tinted with dye as apparently it's physically impossible for dye not to fade. It's for this reason that each of these paints are fully pigmented (to the best of my knowledge) and instead rely on pigment for the colour. Because of this, they cannot be considered as translucent paints - which would instead be dye based inks. You will simply get more transparency, the higher the carrier/ reducer to paint ratio.

hope this helps your decision?
 
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Molotow uses car paint pigments in both their cans and All-4-One airbrush paints. The paint from the cans can be reduced with acetone but the All-4-One is water soluble.
 
Another question. Can com.art be reduced? If so with what?

Can be reduced with just water, i use a homemade brew of windowlen/windex depending on where in the world you are and a couple of drips of glyserine search the forum for more posts on home made brews, there is no actual reducer for com-art



Ride the storm
 
Molotow uses car paint pigments in both their cans and All-4-One airbrush paints. The paint from the cans can be reduced with acetone but the All-4-One is water soluble.
I would be interested in these... I wish Nashville Tn USA had some place that focused on Airbrushes and paints.
 
I'd go with CI or E'Tac EFX. Honestly, it would pretty much just come down to which one I felt like using that day. Or possibly a coin-flip.

I'm not at all a fan of Com Art. For me, it comes too thin out of the bottle, and the coverage is extremely weak. I know Steve Driscoll used it for years, though, so obviously it depends a bit on your taste and style.

As far as colorfastness, paints are rated by the BWS (blue wool scale. I have no idea where the name comes from.) on a scale of 1-8. A 1 would fade due to UV breakdown unless kept in a dark place, basically. An 8 would essentially be impervious to UV damage. Or, at least, by the time it started fading, you'd be too old to care.

I know E'Tac chooses their pigments to have the highest BWS ratings possible while remaining certified non-toxic. I'm not sure what each individual color is rated at, but I'm sure an email to Bill will get you an answer if you're that curious. But, I'm not aware of anyone having any problems with E'Tac fading, so I would consider them "lightfast".

I know all Wicked paints use pigments that rate at least 7 or 8 on the BWS, but I'm not sure on the Illustration. I would think that, since the color palate is basically the same as the Wicked Detail line, they'd use the same pigments in each line. And the pigment used is going to be the main factor in BWS ratings.

Either way, if this is for fine artwork that will be hung somewhere inside, don't worry about lightfastness. If it's going on a Harley tank, use a "UV clear" for your final clear coat.

IMO, E'Tac has better pigments, better spraying, less tip dry, no clogs, and much easier workability than CI. However, the paint film is pretty fragile, and rewettable, so some extra care has to be taken. Also, I've noticed that E'Tac has more "blue shift" as you reach 100% coverage (if you're using the color buffer system), which can make matching colors a bit more difficult.

CI, for me, has the advantage of a familiar, and good, color palate available. It's not that E'Tac's is bad, just that through using Holbien, then Wicked Detail, and now CI, I've gotten very used to that color selection. (Createx based the Detail and CI color palates off of Holbiens colors at Dru's request).

Like I said, though, which I use for any given project is usually a coin-flip. Both work well.
 
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