compressor/airtank help

H

habsfann001

Guest
I've got a badger 180-11 compressor that I want to hook up with a Campbell Hausfeld 2gl airtank. Two ways to do this
1) just take the motor off the Campbell compressor & put on the badger. This is the easiest method but I won't have the on/off switch attached.
2) same as above nut incorporate the on/off switch
I like to think of myself as an idiot savant with tons of practice on the first part, but, alas, barely any on the second - ok - none.
I need someone to either walk me through on how to do this (option #2 with the switch) or point me to a video or detailed write up. It has to be in plain English (see previous idiot savant statement). I would really like to get this thing done. So any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

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Why not wire a light switch and attach it.. instructions on how to wire are with the switch... Most have a live in, live out and neutral. Live from mains goes in.. Then the live goes from the out and onto unit. Make sure your switch is made for the voltage your using.... DONT try a 12v one.

The switch that is on the pic would work.. just put it on your live line to unit. Make sure its voltage rated, but I cant see any regulator or step down on voltage.
 
That's the same model compressor I have. The problem with it is it has a fixed internal auto-shutoff in place of a proper on/off switch, so wiring a switch in isn't just a matter of splicing it into the power line somewhere. You'd want/have to remove the auto shutoff circuit.

Which I'd also love to know how to do, actually. The auto shutoff on this model is really annoying, and every time I plug the compressor in I just want to kick whoever designed it in the fork. I would love to replace the internal shut off with an external controller.
 
Hi littlerick - many thanks for your input. The campbell compressor already has an on/off switch, just not sure how to wire it up using the badger.
 
Thanks Nessus - I know it has an automatic shut off but didn't know how that would come into play with an external switch. So, I've either got to find a schematic for it & yank the auto shut off out or just do my first option of replacing the original comp motor with the badger & live with the auto shut off. That's why I keep coming back to this forum, guys like you two hanging out & giving noobs some sound advice. Appreciate it.
 
I guess the other option would be to do what a lot of others have already done - use a fridge compressor, marry it with the airtank & use the badger as a backup.
 
Oh, I'm a noob too, both to ABing and this forum, LOL. If you go down just a thread or two to my "Steel tank expiration dates" thread, you'll see some of the stuff I've been doing to try and make my 180-11 serviceable.

I'm a bit worried about the airflow rate on it RE: attaching it to a tank. I haven't got mine properly ganged up yet (waiting for a check valve to arrive from Amazon), but just using it with a long coil hose as a buffer, it either runs constantly if regulated above 20psi, or constantly flips off and on at a fast rate (basically a 1.5 second 1:1 duty cycle) below 20psi. I think it pumps out air at pretty much the same volume the airbrush uses it.

This makes me think once I get it attached to the tank, it'll still run either constantly or at a short 1:1 duty cycle once the tank drains to an equilibrium point between the compressor's on and off pressure presets.

Getting a fridge compressor definately is a better solution in the long run, I think. For me at least it's just about making the best of the 180-11 until whenever I'm able to source one for a good price at a budget-friendly time.
 
I'm a bit worried about the airflow rate on it RE: attaching it to a tank. I haven't got mine properly ganged up yet (waiting for a check valve to arrive from Amazon), but just using it with a long coil hose as a buffer, it either runs constantly if regulated above 20psi, or constantly flips off and on at a fast rate (basically a 1.5 second 1:1 duty cycle) below 20psi. I think it pumps out air at pretty much the same volume the airbrush uses it.

This makes me think once I get it attached to the tank, it'll still run either constantly or at a short 1:1 duty cycle once the tank drains to an equilibrium point between the compressor's on and off pressure presets.

Just a thought, but the reason your compressor may be running on a short cycle is that the compressor may have flow switch rather than a pressure switch. If it doesn't have a tank it probably wouldn't need a pressure switch because it doesn't need to stop at a specific pressure. Since it is an "automatic on", to me, would indicate that it has some type of flow switch that turns it on the second you run the airbrush.
 
Interesting! I wasn't aware of the different switch types. I'd assumed that since it shuts off when the pressure is dialed down to under 20psi or so that it was pressure backup behind the regulator that was tripping the switch.

I hope your theory is the case, as it would mean a better duty cycle once I've got the tank properly hooked up.
 
The main power switch should be connected before the auto shutoff switch and would have no effect on it. The switch in the picture should be a 2 wire connection.. both live and it will wire onto the mains lead.
 
Interesting! I wasn't aware of the different switch types. I'd assumed that since it shuts off when the pressure is dialed down to under 20psi or so that it was pressure backup behind the regulator that was tripping the switch.

I hope your theory is the case, as it would mean a better duty cycle once I've got the tank properly hooked up.

It is just a theory, I don't know for sure since I don't have one and don't have a schematic. If it is the case though you'd want to bypass the flow switch of the Badger and use the pressure switch of the Campbell compressor. Otherwise, you'll probably still get the same result. As soon as the air starts moving the compressor would kick on.
 
Can those little ones support the same pressure as the Campbell? The Campbell switch is probably useless.

I guess I don't understand why you don't attached it to the tank and plug it in? Those little things trying to fill big tanks must be a real chore and will probably need some fans to help keep it cool. Even fridge compressors get wicked hot when used alot.
 
Get a big tractor or truck tube and tyre, pump that bugger up with the Badger till it nearly explodes LOL and then attach a reg an airbrush to it and paint away for as long as it lasts LOL..then rinse and repeat, oh and ya can use the tyre as a seat ion the meantime LOL :) not sure what your trying to do, is it just a case of adding the extra air storage, cause in that case I would say put it the Badger compressor in a draw and use when ya want to go on the road and get yaself a real compressor LOL (No offence Mr.Badger I still luv ya)..but really a 25 liter compressor costs little more than $70-80 bucks and would save the heartache or potential electrocution LOL, or heartache by electrocution :)
 
Those little things trying to fill big tanks must be a real chore and will probably need some fans to help keep it cool. Even fridge compressors get wicked hot when used alot.

Oh, I DEFINITELY wouldn't want to fill a tank larger than 2 gallon or so with it. My tank is an 11 gallon, and what I'd do is fill it proper with my garage compressor, and just use the wee Badger one for topping-off duty while I paint.

Only reason I'd use one of these is if (like me) it's what you already have on hand and can't afford anything new just ATM. I wouldn't recommend actually buying one fresh off, as for the same dosh you can get a fridge compressor or something similarly better.
 
I'm assuming you are saying use the garage compressor still attached to the tank, fill it, unplug it, then have the badger take over later to keep noise down?
 
Yarp. My hobby/art space is in an upstairs room, but the garage compressor stays in the garage because it sounds like an entire herd of elephants having a synchronized farting contest. So I charge the tank in the garage opportunistically when it won't bug anyone, then carry the tank indoors to my work area. The Badger I've had for a long time, but never liked using. Recently I hypothesized I could use it to "top off" the tank while it's in the work area, so I could paint longer at a go without being forced to stop when it runs out and and wait a day or more for another opportunity to run the garage compressor.

Haven't tested that properly yet though, as I'm still waiting for the last of the fittings to arrive from Amazon. Right now I'm just using the Badger by itself, but with a coil hose between it an the regulator to buffer the pulses. It... works, but is still not as quiet as I'd like, and I'm kinda worried the constant 1-second start/stop behavior at low pressures may be unhealthy for it.
 
How far away is upstairs? Soz if ya already covered why not-but wouldn't just running a longer hose do the job and whilst at it run a long switch set-up so ya don't have to leave your chair to turn the compressor downstairs on for a refill, easier than walking up and down the stairs all the time with an 11 gallon tank- and covered in recent topics but why not just build a silencing box to keep that herd contained? Much more reliable than any homebuilt frankenstein compressor and by now you'd be running almost silently rather than still trying to work it out, with a few nails, some salvaged panels of wood and some type of old carpet or insulation.. ;)

I wouldn't recommend actually buying one fresh off, as for the same dosh you can get a fridge compressor or something similarly better.

Mmm can't agree with that statement LOL but each to their own :)
 
The room itself is not too far off from right above the garage, but the path between is circuitous enough to make running a hose through the house ridiculous, and I don't have the freedom to run a line through the walls (nor would such a permanent fixture be ideal, as my workspace is not permanent itself).

The compressor itself is just too dang loud no matter what the arrangement. The problem is not that it can't share a room, the problem is it can't share a house... or actually multiple houses, as it is loud enough to be heard from the neighbors' as well. It's just a rubbish compressor all around (loud, underpowered, programmable shutoff is obtuse and doesn't work), so if I'm going to spend any money or effort on it, it'll be to replace it, not to jerry rig a way to kinda-sorta-but-not-really live with it. I'll probably cannibalize it for the tank and replace the motor and controller with quieter and more reliable units sometime in 2015, at which point I'll have a quite and portable compressor I can use wherever/whenever I want.

The badger compressor isn't nearly as loud, but I can't really think of circumstances where I'd recommend it that wouldn't seem contrived specifically for the purpose of recommending it. It just doesn't have any advantages that aren't either negated by disadvantages, or shared by better options in the same price range.
 
Obviously I don't know ya floorplan to your house and never meant to suggest to run a hose through every room in the house but figured a window or such may be present and running a hose may be easy enough done and I've never met any machine I can't silence cheaply but was just throwing some food for thought..Oh and on the last thing..I really really hate home built compressors made out of stuff like fridge compressors and people frankensteining a compressor unless they really have a good understanding of what they are doing and anyone building such that has to ask advice in a forum I think is asking for trouble and most in the long haul spend more than the other alternative in the long run..

You may be more than capable of doing so but many others read these kinda threads and think- jeez maybe I should try that and that can put them in potential danger doing so..I'm not assuming its beyond your ability, for all I know you may be a rocket scientist and you def appear to know what your talking about, but me I'm just a humble Fitter and Turner who has been working, building and repairing this kind of stuff for about 20 odd years and taught it for about 5..So soz to come across maybe a bit full on but just hate these kinda threads and always try to offer, easy, cheap alternatives that I know actually work and doesn't involve any danger to anyone. Maybe not so much directed sometimes at the poster, more so-to have others think of the alternatives if they are in a similar boat..I know money is tight for many, but a $70 dollar tanked compressor and $30 bucks worth of material to build a silencing box is the best way to go, its easy, its cheap and it won't kill, maim or hurt anyone....and can be made way more silent than any and yes I mean any "silent" compressor on the market..Oh if done right of course :)

Silent compressors to me are a joke, no matter who makes them, so many negatives to list I'd bore everyone, home built variety's are one step below that- thus why I disagree with your last statement, the only advantage they have is portability and if you work at a market doing tatts or in others homes etc they are a good option..If working in a studio or in your own home and your reading this thread wondering what silence compressor to buy.....Simply don't..I really am trying to save those kind of people the money in the first place buying an expensive paper weight as that's what they are..and no any other "silent compressor" in badgers price range or home built concoction will not be better, just as equally bad..

But just an opinion LOL, best of luck in ya build, I know it does work well for many and I do hope honestly you find your best option..
 
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