Createx Illustration

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Blackthorne

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Hi guys, can I use Illustration on a motorcycle?

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Same as Wicked , Heat setting it is your friend but time wise before I clear I let it set over night.
 
Ok good ... i alway heat my stuff after job anyway... now i still use my old regular createx set ! Im look to change for better ... and i have too harley to paint soon so.... :-]

I want to try erease technique but im not sure if i can do it with wicked...

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Ok good ... i alway heat my stuff after job anyway... now i still use my old regular createx set ! Im look to change for better ... and i have too harley to paint soon so.... :-]

I want to try erease technique but im not sure if i can do it with wicked...

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I erase wicked all the time and use the scratching tech too.
Scratching is really cool on metal even if you hit the metal . But remember if you are going to erase on metal have a good coat of white down first.
 
I erase wicked all the time and use the scratching tech too.
Scratching is really cool on metal even if you hit the metal . But remember if you are going to erase on metal have a good coat of white down first.

What do you use for primer on metal ? auto air sealer?

You can erase only on metal, or on any surface?

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The pigments used in the Illustration line are the same ones used in the Wicked line, which Createx says all score a 7 or 8 out of a possible 8 on the BWS test. In other words, they're not going to fade in the sun. I probably wouldn't use it as a basecoat, but for artwork, it works great. Like mentioned above, you can use the "soft dry" time to use erasing, scraping, re-wetting, etc. During that window, the CI is pretty easy to work. Not E'Tac EFX easy, but WAY easier than the Wicked paints. Once that window is closed (either by time of heat setting), the film is pretty close to being as strong as Wicked.

You can erase and scratch Wicked Detail, and I think the regular Wicked, but it's some pretty tough stuff, and you wind up going through erasers pretty quick.

You can erase or scratch on any surface that can take it. On metal, you have to be careful of scratching through the basecoat. It's probably most commonly done on illustration board, gesso'd canvas, clay board, etc. Unfortunately, not many of the illustration boards around now hold up too well. I'm still looking for a "new" board now that my Crescent 7218 has run out.

Trying scratching techniques on a t-shirt, however, is probably not going to work out to well. Sometimes it's a bit of trial-and-error.

I think that new Auto Borne primer/sealer stuff is supposed to be a DTS primer, which would let you use waterborne/based paints for everything but the clear coat. I haven't tried the stuff yet, though.

Otherwise my typical priming on metal is to prep and sand it, spray two coats of an acid tech primer, then three healthy coats of a urethane primer/surfacer. Follwed by the usual guide coat and block sanding, touchups, repeat cycle. My favorite primer is Matrix 2KPB, but most any decent one will work. If the stuff is $40 a gallon, there's probably a reason. lol.
 
If you want to "work" your paint on metal, might I suggest you invest in a mobile 'phone plastic stylus.
Great little tool for adding fine lines and details on your artworks, clean real easy and are cheap cmpared to the dedicated ones!
You'd really have to be diggin' with it to get down to base layers, but I think it'll work just fine.
Just a thought, you could shape the end with a peice of fine emery cloth, if you needed a flatter edge.
Win/win I reckon.
 
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