difference between a .35 and .2 nozzle/needle

J

JCD

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I'm considering buying a cheap knockoff of the hi line hp bh .2mm for fine line detail but I can't find any clear examples of what the difference would be compared to a .35mm.

Would anyone with both sizes mind showing an example of their finest line from each one?

Thanks, Jim
 
Being I am at work right now it would be later today.
But mainly it is a lot easier to do fine line with the .2 or even .18 or .15 than with the .35. But noticed I said easier because with practice you can pull fine lines with a .5
 
As Mr M said, it's easier to get fine detail with a smaller needle tip, the shallow taper allows for a more gradual opening of the nozzle.

Look at some of the masters, many use an eclipse with a .35 for 90% of their work! and rarely use a very small tip.


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Thanks Herb, While I can get a fine (as in pencil tip size) line from my Harbor Freight .35 even though I can't remove the cap, I am unable to make the ultra fine lines I see on some paintings like the outer edge of the ear on Marissa's cat picture.

Lol Wayne, I'm so far from the masters in ability I might as well try unicycling to the Moon, I need all the help I can get.

Thanks, Jim
 
not so much comedians...... just sarcastic bstards..... i was gona chime in with the same answer but jgny beat me to it
 
Yup me too, at least we can all do basic math LOL..

Someone mentioned peeps using a 0.3 and creating quite fine lines, I can really be bothered changing head assemblys anymore so do a lot of work with a 0.3, just speed up the stroke and you will get a very fine line (About 0.3 to be exact LOL) and 0.3 of a mm is a very fine line..The 0.2 will beat that and make life a little easier to produce it but really whats 0.15 between friends...
 
yup what ^ said. You can produce just as fine a line with a .35 or sometimes even with a .5. its all about paint reduction, air pressure, speed and control. Also removing your needle cap will drastically make your lines thinner because with the cap on it creates more turbulence and causes a wider fan pattern. I can spray just as small with my .35 as all of my .2, it's just easier and more controlled with a .2 as you can move slower and build up layers whereas using a .35 or a .5 you would have to do it in a single stroke and a much faster pass.
 
The crown is what you remove that extends past the needle. If airbrush doesn't work that means you are taking off the air cap which yeah you can't remove that from any airbrush and have it work. I don't recommend knockoffs. Cheap for a reason you get what you pay for and there are no replacement parts. You can get a very good quality airbrush for just under or around $100. Better to save up longer for proper equipment imo.

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Keep eating your noodles JCD or go without for an extra month or two..as immortal stated, get to about the $80-$100 mark and you'll get yourself a good starter brush, like for example a Badger Patriot..I wouldn't waste my time with what you posted, its a cheap knock-off and may last a painting or two, sometimes you get lucky and it may continue to serve you OK but generally they fall apart, rust and just don't spray very well as the attention to the fine tolerances bigger brands utilize are not there in cheaper guns..They at times can really frustrate new painters into believing airbrushing is too hard..Normally its their airbrush and not them that is the issue..Its rarely this tradesman blames his tools but when using cheap shiz..I always do LOL..GL
 
i would say that it is probably the size..one is bigger than the other...kinda like a straw
 
I really appreciate the advice.

QA does concern me but as long as the nozzle/needle are centered I don't see much else that I couldn't hone, polish or adjust for better performance.

I thought an inspection with a loupe would tell me if it were a keeper or not and if not I can send it back and only be out a few bucks shipping.

My artistic skills are not up to a great brush by any means, I'm just learning to draw, a few months ago my stick figures looked bad.

My only brushes are a .35 Harbor Freight special and .5 master trigger gun that after I worked on them, I'm pleased with them.

I don't think the knock off would be any worse to bring up to snuff.

I'm just curious about the difference in the fine lines from a .35 compared to a .2, using the .2 can you make a line that is almost half as thick?

Thanks, Jim
 
using the .2 can you make a line that is almost half as thick?

Already been answered m8, yes you can..BUT..Line thickness isn't just the tip size, thats the main influence but reduction, pressure, speed of stroke, paint type etc etc is also relevant and needs to be considered..EG Its been mentioned above a few times that someone who's been around an airbrush for awhile can make a 0.5 do a fine line..Ya gotta remember the sizes we are talking about here..O.5 mm is half of a millimeter, compare that to a 0.5 fine line graphic pen..Its a fine line LOL, a 0.2 will be even tighter but seriously its bugga all we are talking about here and no matter how fine you go with your tip, if you don't quite have the experiance running it to its best, you still likely produce a 0.5 line as the speed and control isn't there yet..Practice first, get the skills up and when your creating nice fine lines with a 0.35 then consider if you need to go finer...

Here's a video I did awhile back that kinda shows of what an $100 setup can achieve..Although I'm using my Anthem in it with the fine line conversion kit the same conversion kit I believe fits the patriot..The patriot can be bought for around 80-100, the conversion kit I bout for about $25 (They may be more expensive now)..It does show a cheap setup can perform as well as a lot more expensive set-ups but it is still from a quality manufacturer..If you decide to go cheap it is your choice but don't expect the same performance just because of needle size...

[video=youtube;hbc5W6OHh1Q]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbc5W6OHh1Q[/video]

Good luck..
 
Thanks for the video Reb, I appreciate everyone's input.

Have a good one, Jim
 
The one big thing above all is you need to comfortable with the AB set up you are using ,because if not you will only become frustrated with the lack of result you are trying to achieve .The differences in needle sizes as with my full size spray guns vary massively and the rule of thumb is a bigger needle /nozzle set up allows for greater amounts of material to be put down and also of a greater viscosity .Air caps also have a variable effect on this too as mentioned earlier .With the air brush i use i have various needle/nozzle set ups that i interchange to achieve my desired results they are from 1.2 to .35 . They are just an aid i now need due to problems with my hands , however i used to achieve the same results using different techniques with just a .35 AB when i started . Have a play with the set up you have and try a few adjustments with air/paint etc before you rush out and buy another AB IMHO.
 
Already been answered m8, yes you can..BUT..Line thickness isn't just the tip size, thats the main influence but reduction, pressure, speed of stroke, paint type etc etc is also relevant and needs to be considered..EG Its been mentioned above a few times that someone who's been around an airbrush for awhile can make a 0.5 do a fine line..Ya gotta remember the sizes we are talking about here..O.5 mm is half of a millimeter, compare that to a 0.5 fine line graphic pen..Its a fine line LOL, a 0.2 will be even tighter but seriously its bugga all we are talking about here and no matter how fine you go with your tip, if you don't quite have the experiance running it to its best, you still likely produce a 0.5 line as the speed and control isn't there yet..Practice first, get the skills up and when your creating nice fine lines with a 0.35 then consider if you need to go finer...

Here's a video I did awhile back that kinda shows of what an $100 setup can achieve..Although I'm using my Anthem in it with the fine line conversion kit the same conversion kit I believe fits the patriot..The patriot can be bought for around 80-100, the conversion kit I bout for about $25 (They may be more expensive now)..It does show a cheap setup can perform as well as a lot more expensive set-ups but it is still from a quality manufacturer..If you decide to go cheap it is your choice but don't expect the same performance just because of needle size...

[video=youtube;hbc5W6OHh1Q]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbc5W6OHh1Q[/video]

Good luck..

Nice video. I think I'll stick with my microns, but still cool. lol. I agree that the "average" airbrush artist puts a little too much stock into nozzle size as opposed to overall design. In my expirience, a well designed, well built airbrush with a .35 tip can do just as fine of lines as a cheap knock-off with a .2.
 
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