flesh colours

B

bazza

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gday guys does anyone have a mixture ratio for fleh tones im wasting an awfull lot of paint trying to get this right, eg. base tone mid tone shadow tone any help would be great thanks
 
skin tones are hard because no one has the exact same skin tone.
Look into Wicked Steve Driscoll's flesh tones kits or Com-art also has a flesh tone kit .

maybe we can get Clive to give up a mixture secret :D
 
Easiest way to create skin tones while retaining great control, is to spray in brown hues (capuut mortum of Illu Color for instance) like you were spraying a monochrome portrait. After all accents have been made, spray over it with a very diluted orange (paint : water = 1 : 20) and skin tones will appear immediately. The amount of the underlying brown and the orange sprayed over it determine the nature of the skin color.

I never quite understood the necessity of skin tone sets, some of which contain weird unnatural colors. They're probably just a commercial thing.
 
maybe post the reference your trying to achieve as Herb mentioned there is no real specific color, I generally use a tan for my base which is a few drops of brown to a dozen or more of white and then reduced, my second tone is generally the same color but sprayed to a higher intensity or a more opaque version, sometimes I'll add a drop of red for a more pinkish look, sometimes more brown for a more tanned look but it really does depend on the reference, any local colors that reference may be reflecting etc..I do have some shop bought skin tones and in the bottle they look un-natural but when reduced and sprayed right they work well for some portraits..But 99% of the time will mix my own..
 
This is from an other post on this forum only I copied the part that I needed ;)

Hope it helps all credits go to whom ever posted it

Found this a long time ago but as with age I forgot where I had it but since I found it again I thought I would post it up and share.
First: Use yellow and blue to make a green paint, then mix in the same amount of orange or red to produce a brown. Mix the paint thoroughly to produce a smooth brown color.
Next: Add a small amount of white paint to lighten the brown color, then add just a touch of yellow to produce a tan sienna color.
Next: Split the mixture of sienna color in two separate piles then add just a touch of light red to one pile of sienna. Mix this pile thoroughly to produce an umber color.
Lastly: Use small portions of both sienna and umber and mix together to produce a rosy flesh color. Add a little white to the mixture to produce a natural fleshy skin tone.
Hope it helps some of you out and give some a starting point on skin.
 
This is from an other post on this forum only I copied the part that I needed ;)

Hope it helps all credits go to whom ever posted it
He had seen this one being I checked it out to make sure. I was the one who posted it.
But it is good to see people do still look at it.
 
skin tones are hard because no one has the exact same skin tone.
Look into Wicked Steve Driscoll's flesh tones kits or Com-art also has a flesh tone kit .

maybe we can get Clive to give up a mixture secret :D

If I remember right (as my mix ratios are on the wall in my studio), I work on 10 white: 2 orange: 1 brown as a base colour.......... I think!!
 
If I remember right (as my mix ratios are on the wall in my studio), I work on 10 white: 2 orange: 1 brown as a base colour.......... I think!!

I will have to give that a go.

Now post a HD pic of that wall so we can see what other secrets you are hiding:D
 
Uh ohhh hope you got sign off to paint Seamonkeys cousin there on the left center. :eagerness:
 
Wil get a panoramic one for you next time I'm up!!

make sure it is in full raw setting and HD .. I want to print in on the huge laser printer at work and then put it all together so maybe ,, Just maybe I can paint as good as you:D
 
The steve driscoll flesh tone kit, is good for the picture that comes with it to try, but if you use that method for other paintings, it comes out too red (IMO), however the flesh tone base that comes with it, makes a great starting point when over reduced, to build on, and by using the kit you understand how to use the different colours to build the tones. You will just have to work out how to adjust it for other pictures. The colours it comes with are useful in themselves though anyway, get a blue to go with it, and you have the primary colours, a purple, a smoke black, and the flesh base, you can mix almost any colour you like, get an opaque black and white, and you are good for anything.
 
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