Frisket film ???

RichardH

Detail Decepticon!
I have never used frisket film before now and I am having a problem with it. I have always taped things and was wanting to try the film. Now after using it, I can't see where I have cut it with a knife. How do others use it with not so perfect vision??
Can I mist a coat of paint over it so it will show where I have cut or maybe a colored marker. The stuff is expensive for me and don't want to waste no more that necessary.
Any advise would be appreciated.

Richard
 
Just to add to the post. My wife has some Glad Press and seal she uses in the kitchen and I tried it on a piece of paper and it does mask real easy. I had to rub it some to get the bubbles out and then I took my knife and cut it. It is LOW tack and it has worked so far. I noticed the bad thing with this is it would be hard to reuse it since it so thin and I took a High lighter and went over it where I wanted to cut and that worked great.
I guess I answered my own question.

Richard
 
If you were used to masking and it worked for you, stick with it, I avoid using frisket because there are to many risks with it, I work on a magnetic white board and just cut up an extra copy of my image and hold the pieces in place with small magnets, I never ever put anything sticky on top of my paintings, most frisket type masking won't damage most papers unless you actually do your cutting on the paper in which case it could lift the paper at the points where you've cut, however, many (including me) have had problems with paint lifting after sticking the film on top of it, some paints are more at risk than others, I also don't have the patience to keep moving the stuff around.
 
If you were used to masking and it worked for you, stick with it, I avoid using frisket because there are to many risks with it, I work on a magnetic white board and just cut up an extra copy of my image and hold the pieces in place with small magnets, I never ever put anything sticky on top of my paintings, most frisket type masking won't damage most papers unless you actually do your cutting on the paper in which case it could lift the paper at the points where you've cut, however, many (including me) have had problems with paint lifting after sticking the film on top of it, some paints are more at risk than others, I also don't have the patience to keep moving the stuff around.


Hey Madbrush, Yes I have just starting trying it and have found my touch with a knife does cut into the paper. I am wanting a fine hard line for some things and using a cut up paper mask doesn't give me what I want. My old shaky hands just won't let me hand paint my hard lines. The press and seal kitchen wrap doesn't seem to leave anything sticky on the paper. I did have a problem with the sticky stuff from frisket though.
Being new to airbrushing on paper is a challenge. Time for improvement and knowledge of the medium will come if I live long enough. Being 71 years old, I had better get busy. lollollollol:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Richard
 
Hey Madbrush, Yes I have just starting trying it and have found my touch with a knife does cut into the paper. I am wanting a fine hard line for some things and using a cut up paper mask doesn't give me what I want. My old shaky hands just won't let me hand paint my hard lines. The press and seal kitchen wrap doesn't seem to leave anything sticky on the paper. I did have a problem with the sticky stuff from frisket though.
Being new to airbrushing on paper is a challenge. Time for improvement and knowledge of the medium will come if I live long enough. Being 71 years old, I had better get busy. lollollollol:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Richard

I use Schoellerhammer No.4 airbrush paper which great stuff, I don't know how easy it would be for you to get hold of but along with my cut up image I also use low tack masking taper made for use on glass, you don't need to freehand your hard lines, you can also use free hand stencils or cut up an image as I do and cut little holes in the pieces to attach with smaller pieces of tape, my problem with frisket is we are asking for trouble when we cover a whole piece with the stuff.

If you would rather freehand without the shakes, you would be forgiven for using a sign-writer's maul stick, I do that on larger paintings, for smaller paintings I rest the heel of my hand on the board, i too suffer from shakes due to being an alcoholic, not a drop opinion over 5 years but the skies will never stop:confused:
 
I use Schoellerhammer No.4 airbrush paper which great stuff, I don't know how easy it would be for you to get hold of but along with my cut up image I also use low tack masking taper made for use on glass, you don't need to freehand your hard lines, you can also use free hand stencils or cut up an image as I do and cut little holes in the pieces to attach with smaller pieces of tape, my problem with frisket is we are asking for trouble when we cover a whole piece with the stuff.

If you would rather freehand without the shakes, you would be forgiven for using a sign-writer's maul stick, I do that on larger paintings, for smaller paintings I rest the heel of my hand on the board, i too suffer from shakes due to being an alcoholic, not a drop opinion over 5 years but the skies will never stop:confused:


Hey that's great on the not drinking. I never had that problem. Just can't stand the taste. My son had that problem and he spent 1 month in a rehab place. As far as I know, he hasn't touched anything in 6 months. I do smoke and have tried to quit but I know the feeling of got to have one.
I'll try a few different papers. I think I can find the paper you use.
Thanks
Richard
 
It is going to be hard to find Schoellerhammer paper for awhile as they were bought out last spring by Reflex. They are suppose to continue producing it, but you know how that goes after a buy out for quality. No word of when the new paper will be available especially state side. I know The Paper Mill has less and less in stock:( Glad I bought some a few months ago.
 
You could always consider a vinyl cutter/plotter if things are getting a struggle to see..saves a crap load of time also and not to expensive these days..personally I use laminating sheets, laminate the design between the sheets then cut it out on a solid glass surface or cutting board/mat..i hate cutting on a job and essentially that is what frisket was designed for, intricate designs are a struggle with it especially and laying out a cut design can be a nightmare at times..
 
You could always consider a vinyl cutter/plotter if things are getting a struggle to see..saves a crap load of time also and not to expensive these days..personally I use laminating sheets, laminate the design between the sheets then cut it out on a solid glass surface or cutting board/mat..i hate cutting on a job and essentially that is what frisket was designed for, intricate designs are a struggle with it especially and laying out a cut design can be a nightmare at times..


Yep, The frisket is already in the drawer. I might need it sometime so I will hold onto it if I can remember where I put it. "That's an age problem you know".lollol

Thanks
Richard
 
It is going to be hard to find Schoellerhammer paper for awhile as they were bought out last spring by Reflex. They are suppose to continue producing it, but you know how that goes after a buy out for quality. No word of when the new paper will be available especially state side. I know The Paper Mill has less and less in stock:( Glad I bought some a few months ago.


Hey Greg, I checked their website and it says they have some. Going to call and order if they still have some.
Thanks
Richard
 
Just to add to the post. My wife has some Glad Press and seal she uses in the kitchen and I tried it on a piece of paper and it does mask real easy. I had to rub it some to get the bubbles out and then I took my knife and cut it. It is LOW tack and it has worked so far. I noticed the bad thing with this is it would be hard to reuse it since it so thin and I took a High lighter and went over it where I wanted to cut and that worked great.
I guess I answered my own question.

Richard
yep
 
Chicago Airbrush sells a matt frisket instead of clear, although I've yet to use it.
 
Chicago Airbrush sells a matt frisket instead of clear, although I've yet to use it.


Hey Barquester, I had never used it before and bought it when I got my iwata. It is now in the drawer. I'll use it if and only when nothing else works. I am working on something now and just using cut up paper templates. Working better.
Hope your doing well. Man, paint mixing is tedious when I have never mixed before. I have a color wheel but it is only for reference since Createx illustration doesn't really match except black and white. :confused::confused:

Richard
 
Hey Barquester, I had never used it before and bought it when I got my iwata. It is now in the drawer. I'll use it if and only when nothing else works. I am working on something now and just using cut up paper templates. Working better.
Hope your doing well. Man, paint mixing is tedious when I have never mixed before. I have a color wheel but it is only for reference since Createx illustration doesn't really match except black and white. :confused::confused:

Richard
Richard, paint mixing will forever be tedious for anyone who mixes colors, get used to that part, sometimes it just takes hours. There is some help online, here is a site that show how to mix several colors, (see about a page down", the names of the colors are on the left and the mixing chart is in the middle.
http://www.stylepinner.com/color-wheel-acrylic-paint/Y29sb3Itd2hlZWwtYWNyeWxpYy1wYWludA/

Another site will analyze a spot on your reference and give several ways to mix it. Warning, the colors used I guarantee you won't have but you'll get the idea, this might help with some of the color abbreviations: http://www.winsornewton.com/na/discover/resources/colour-charts/professional-acrylic
. Keep in mind there are many colors that simply can't be made with red, yellow and blue alone.
http://sensuallogic.com/paintmaker/
Years ago I read a book called "Blue and Yellow Don't Make Green", the book goes into the difficulties of mixing colors. Maybe you could get it from a library.
The neatest trick in color mixing I learned from a sign painter: to make grey mix brilliant blue and orange. No tedious stirring like you do with black and white.
 
Richard, paint mixing will forever be tedious for anyone who mixes colors, get used to that part, sometimes it just takes hours. There is some help online, here is a site that show how to mix several colors, (see about a page down", the names of the colors are on the left and the mixing chart is in the middle.
http://www.stylepinner.com/color-wheel-acrylic-paint/Y29sb3Itd2hlZWwtYWNyeWxpYy1wYWludA/

Another site will analyze a spot on your reference and give several ways to mix it. Warning, the colors used I guarantee you won't have but you'll get the idea, this might help with some of the color abbreviations: http://www.winsornewton.com/na/discover/resources/colour-charts/professional-acrylic
. Keep in mind there are many colors that simply can't be made with red, yellow and blue alone.
http://sensuallogic.com/paintmaker/
Years ago I read a book called "Blue and Yellow Don't Make Green", the book goes into the difficulties of mixing colors. Maybe you could get it from a library.
The neatest trick in color mixing I learned from a sign painter: to make grey mix brilliant blue and orange. No tedious stirring like you do with black and white.


Thanks Barquester, I bookmarked those and they will help a lot.
I owned a photo color lab back in the 70's and 80's and everything was in Cyan, Magenta and Yellow as far as printing on color paper. For some reason I am having a little problem with red,green and blue. Createx illustration colors don't have what I call a standard basic color. I do have some wicked paint that are the basic but I haven't tried them yet. I want to get used to the illustration ones first. Mixing will come around. Just takes doing and time. Been reading a lot of the pinned post on mixing and what each does with the other.
I have started on a picture of some apples and a bowl and I am going to call it " stand back". If you stand way back it looks like an apple, up close it looks like something else. lollollollollollollollol

Thanks
Richard
 
So you know the difference between additive and subtractive color then, that will help a lot. Now get used to the subtractive.
I've spent a lot of time in a photo lab myself, my first love was Tri-X and D-76. C-41 and E-6 came much later. You wouldn't happen to have a 60's Photo Lab Index would you? There's a recipe in there I want to find again.
 
So you know the difference between additive and subtractive color then, that will help a lot. Now get used to the subtractive.
I've spent a lot of time in a photo lab myself, my first love was Tri-X and D-76. C-41 and E-6 came much later. You wouldn't happen to have a 60's Photo Lab Index would you? There's a recipe in there I want to find again.


After the digital started showing up at the weddings and things, I closed the studio because I didn't want to invest in digital and printing. I had a b+w darkroom set up at my house for years and had to take it down a couple of years ago. I threw the old books including the one you want away since they were all most useless now. Film, chemicals and paper are just about all over with. It has gotten so expensive for some good paper and film now. All I have left is some Ansel Adams books and zone system books. If you want them, their yours for just postage. PM me if you are interested.

Richard
 
After the digital started showing up at the weddings and things, I closed the studio because I didn't want to invest in digital and printing. I had a b+w darkroom set up at my house for years and had to take it down a couple of years ago. I threw the old books including the one you want away since they were all most useless now. Film, chemicals and paper are just about all over with. It has gotten so expensive for some good paper and film now. All I have left is some Ansel Adams books and zone system books. If you want them, their yours for just postage. PM me if you are interested.

Richard
I did pretty much the same path you took when digital hit. Ah, Ansel and his zone, those were the days.
Back in the 80's I found a very old graveyard in west Oklahoma with a bunch of crumbling tombstones. Tombstones were of poor construction in the early 1900's, I've seen many made of concrete with bottle caps for letters. But one lady died in the late 20's and on this old tombstone was a pristine monochrome oval portrait in ceramic by photography. It was about 12" high and looked like it had been made yesterday. The setting sun had cooked it every summer since then. I thought at the time I wouldn't mind doing that for awhile but I have not had any success.
In the old PL Index there was a recipe for printing on ceramic and then firing it in a kiln that I sure wish I had written down. None of the newer versions have it since they streamlined the Index to make way for newer formulas.
 
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