Help with first colour attempt please

S

Smiler65

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right I've found a ref I want to try my hand at. It's not the style of pic I'm aiming to get to but think it will help me doing shapes and blends.
It's a cartoon style pic but the main outline isn't a black outline but the basic colours of each individual parts.
I can break the picture down very easily so that's not the problem,my questions are do I lay down a light grey outline or do I mix the individual colours and out line in that? Where the colours are darker area do I lay down a grey shadow for the colour paint to go over thus making it darker?

I'll be using transparent paints to do the pic. This is the pic I want to attempt. I did convert to black and white but it's not the same impact.
image.jpg
 
First question , Are you painting this on a white or black background?
You can shadow the color with a little trans parent smoke for the darker areas ,
But do the layout meaning all the shapes in the lightest of the color and work Light colors to dark. That way you do not go to dark .
Hope that make some sense.
 
On white paper Herb,

Makes sense doing light to dark, but do you mean, light red in red areas etc?
 
On white paper Herb,

Makes sense doing light to dark, but do you mean, light red in red areas etc?
In something with simple tones like this, you're light areas are the same colors as the dark, just not sprayed at 100%. Not that there really is a 100% value for a transparent paint. I thought I did a quick tutorial on color matching transparent paints, but I can't remember.

Basically spray a gradient down the edge of a piece of printer paper ranging from white to as dark as you need it. Put the area up to your reference and match the value(darkness) to where it is the same as the darker area of the image. You will then see that the color is too red, yellow, etc. add some of its complementary color to kill the saturation some. Do the gradient again on another edge of the paper and repeat until your color is correct.
 
Looks like this is going to be harder than I thought. Better go read some stuff on colour theory.
 
Somewhere on the forum is a thread about using colouring books to practice with colour and shading by simply colouring in using the airbrush. I did a few and it is really good for learning the light source and shade and makes you think about it.
 
This is something I was working on ( until my airbrush failed) that shows what a translucent looks like at different intensities. This is all the same color. The darker areas are just thicker coverage.
 

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Somewhere on the forum is a thread about using colouring books to practice with colour and shading by simply colouring in using the airbrush. I did a few and it is really good for learning the light source and shade and makes you think about it.
I was reading that thread earlier thanks
 
This is something I was working on ( until my airbrush failed) that shows what a translucent looks like at different intensities. This is all the same color. The darker areas are just thicker coverage.
thanks for that great reference,hope you get you airbrush sorted
 
In most "colouring " books they give you a picture and then a blank outline to copy .
This exercise, apart from teaching trigger control, also makes the mind considr how tones and shades [ shadows ] affect the image.
A very worthwhile exercise - even if you cop flack from the kids.
Word to the wise - don't get caught using theirs!
Be wise and get your own!:)
 
Check your PM's. Karma is coming back around. :thumbsup:

It's seems that every time I switch on my computer something beautiful happens, it can be very difficult to paint anything when there is so much to see here on the forum:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

@Smiler65 I'm sorry I can't help you much when it comes to colour, being a painter by trade I have mixed all my own colours purely by sight for over forty years so it's not something I could teach, but luckily Jeff has you covered:)
 
Have to agree that there is far to much going on here,if i spent as much time painting as i do on the forum i wouldnt need to be asking so many questions.
 
Have to agree that there is far to much going on here,if i spent as much time painting as i do on the forum i wouldnt need to be asking so many questions.

You can never ask too many questions, it's all here for you so take all you can get, all we want at the end of the day is to make the world of art bigger:)

I think that the new forum layout brought with some kind if "kindness" injection:thumbsup:
 
Have to agree that there is far to much going on here,if i spent as much time painting as i do on the forum i wouldnt need to be asking so many questions.

your asking so I don't have to,,,,lol lol lol.....I just cant seem to retain the info I read....lol
 
In most "colouring " books they give you a picture and then a blank outline to copy .
This exercise, apart from teaching trigger control, also makes the mind considr how tones and shades [ shadows ] affect the image.
A very worthwhile exercise - even if you cop flack from the kids.
Word to the wise - don't get caught using theirs!
Be wise and get your own!:)
will also try this out as I need better trigger control aswell.
The kids are 17 & 19 and if they give me any grieve I'll just kick um out and the can wake up to the real world of working and keeping a houselollol
 
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