Help with perspective

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pugster

Guest
Hi all, i have no formal art training and could do with a little help with perspective as i cant find the answer to my question online, i have airbrushed a standard backscene ( nightsky, mountains etc ) and wanted to make it look like you are looking out of an open pair of windows ( open different amounts) , i marked my horizon out and vanishing points etc but am going wrong with my window angles somewhere as it does not look right once i lay the tracing paper ive marked them on over the painting.
Can anyone point me to or explain how to work the angles out so that they are correct when showing multiple windows open at different angles on the same painting ( i.e the window length will stay the same but the way its angle changes to show how open/ closed it is and how to work it out correctly)

Thx in advance​
 
That's a hard question pugster - you may be best off asking on a mathematics forum? :laugh: you could look for reference photos instead of making it yourself? I don't know of any modern airbrush artists who work in this way.. normally faster and better results with references.
 
Imagine a road with electrical poles going straight off into the horizon. It will go to a vanishing point. To keep perspective everything will aim toward the same vanishing point.
 
Imagine a road with electrical poles going straight off into the horizon. It will go to a vanishing point. To keep perspective everything will aim toward the same vanishing point.
@zimmer , I think the question was do do with how to work out how far apart the poles would be .....
 
Make youreself a stencil 2 or 3 tmes smaller than your painted window. Place this stencil right in the middle of your window. Connecting the inner window-corners with the outer stencil corners will give you the correct angels. Moving the stencil left/right changes the opening amount of the lids, moving the stencil up and down will change the point of view. Sounds confusing, yes it is. So i try to give you an idea with the attached pic.
 

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many thanks to the people that answered , unfortunately i have no reference photo , the pic is out my head and just cobbled together , i was going to hand overpaint the windows in to make them really stand out and see what it looked like - trying to work out the correct angles so they looked right once laid out proved more challenging than i thought :) (my tracing paper lookedd like a scene from the matrix :laugh:

many thank kjukju , that works perfectly :thumbsup:
 
Well, this will hlp you to get an idea and show the correct relation of angles. But it will alwas look a little wrong, because it is. The better version is tu get yourself a refrecnce. Cut a window from a piece of paper and you'll get the real world ;)
 

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Make your own ref, by taking some photos of some windows with the look you are after, take a few variations, or take one, and if it's not quite right make some adjustments and take another. You could even print them out on some kind of acetate (depending on the size of the artwork) so that you can overlay them to make sure they look right.
 
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