Holding question...

M

mrsuthern

Guest
Ok...I admit. I haven't been anywhere near a consistent practice with my AB. I still have the enthusiasm but have been lacking time, and well to be honest decisiveness on what to try. This week end I had time to mess with it for about an hour or two and learned a couple of things.
First, on the back my AB I finally realized the usefulness of the adjustment. Yes, I am slow on the up take when certain things aren't my focus lol. I see this as very helpful but want to make sure it doesn't become a crutch against learning control.
Second, holding the AB.... Anyone got any good solid tips? Here's my problem, the body of the AB is small, I dont have big hands at all but for me to try and grip the thing like Mr.AB tutor shows in the video, aint happening for me. My mechanic hands can not come to grips with it. I have no problems holding and working things in a multifunctional way, I am a gamer, play some guitar, and heck use my hand 12 hours a day turning wrenches and parts in all kinds of awkward positions. But unless I hold my AB like a pistol (think shooting a hand gun), I cannot get a grip and when I do manage it count about 3 minutes and old man hand cramps kick in (I'm only 40). The other part of that, being the pistol grip hold works a bit, it limits the agility of the brush and techniques.
Soooo.... for some of the less gentled, age driven, career damaged folks out there. What did you try and come to a conclusion on to help hold on to the little sucker so you can keep some agility with it? Dagger strokes, however possible, is not very practical with a 2 hand movement for me.
 
....ok.... edit.... watching seamonkey again, I am gonna try putting something on top of the trigger. Maybe will wrap some rubber bands around the body to open my fingers up some more to see if that helps.
 
do a search for trigger stixx, fairly cheap, 3D printed in the us, come in different colors and are easily removable. About $3-5 each unless you need a 10 pack. I use the short ones on everything but my microns. They have them for Iwata and Badger and maybe 1-2 others.
 
Have you tried the knuckle dagger technique? I'm a diesel mechanic myself so I know all about that. Your hands always freaking hurt and don't bend normally because of all the contorting we do. This technique works for me as takes less movement and you aren't pressing down with the tip of your finger but rocking the trigger with the side of your knuckle. It's basically like a trigger grip and pulling the trigger, only using the side of your first knuckle to control the trigger.
I have severe arthritis from our line of work and I can airbrush for 18 hours straight and never have a cramp. Have me try to hold a bolt with 2 fingers for 5 minutes and I'll have dropped it by minute 2.
 
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I've bought a couple of those TriggerStix and they work pretty good. I got cramped up when I first started, after I put one of these on I had forgotten about getting cramps until I came across this thread. While I was waiting for the order to ship (they make them when ordered) I used a little dome shaped adhesive rubber bumper (like you'd put on small furniture to keep from scratching the floor) on my brush to see how it felt. It was comfortable enough that if I had tried it before I placed the order I would have just kept on using it.
The TriggerStix are nice though, they freely rotate on the trigger and they come in a small and large (height wise), I got the small ones.
 
Immortal is there a video demonstrating that?
And yea you nailed the symptoms on the head almost exactly.
Thanks for the other tips too. That product looks cool but until work picks back up I will have to resort to the hot glue method.
 
Just youtube mike learn airbrush. Most of the snippets from the missed friday night bs streams show his hand and the grip.
 
Got a moment between repair orders and found it. Can't wait to try it out. Makes a lot of sense too.
 
Try the Dru Blair way.

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another good tip. Too bad I dont have an IWATA for the spring part but his grip is very close to the "knuckle dragger" style that Immortal pointed too.
 
Yeah Dru Blairs is similar, but a different motion in rocking the trigger with finger instead of knuckle. Problem I see with his method is that your finger would hit the cup on a normal gravity feed airbrush, especially on a iwata or richpen since the cups are so damn close to the trigger.
 
This is how I hold my airbrush and operate the trigger.

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It's funny how everyone holds it differently. As long as it's not with your thumb as I've seen before. Just irks me, but there are some people that are really good at it that way. I couldn't do it the way you just posted, I have a nerve in my finger almost at the end that would get fried using that motion. Our bodies are so weird.
 
I added a moisture trap at the air connectionImageUploadedByTapatalk1410559467.365580.jpg to help with the grip.
 
Irks me to when peeps use their thumbs but have seen some awesome flingers doing so, so whatever works for em, but found out in that vid I've been doing it all wrong LOL, I'm a finger point kinda person and still feel good control (It really comes down to each person as there is no standard way to gain that comfort, whats comfy for one is awkward for another) and maybe after a 6 hr stint getting a bit sore but lucky enuf not really to cramp..You could also consider a grex trigger grip airbrush, kinda like a spray gun ultimately and could have its own control issues and personaly have never used one but could be good for those with hands that suffer..GL

http://www.amazon.com/Grex-Tritium-TS3-Double-Trigger-Airbrush/dp/B002XQ2K66
 
I hear you about using thumbs. Whatever is comfortable. H. R. Giger used his thumb. Lol
 
I'm still a noob, but for fine control I find myself sort of pinching the trigger between my index finger and thumb. Seems to give me much finer control, but that may be a lack of practice. Also because the air valve spring on my Iwata feels stiff. If I don't do the pinch thing, it feels a bit too on/off to control precisely. I've got a Zsolt spring on order, so hopefully that'll improve once it's arrived and installed.
 
I'm still a noob, but for fine control I find myself sort of pinching the trigger between my index finger and thumb. Seems to give me much finer control, but that may be a lack of practice. Also because the air valve spring on my Iwata feels stiff. If I don't do the pinch thing, it feels a bit too on/off to control precisely. I've got a Zsolt spring on order, so hopefully that'll improve once it's arrived and installed.

@Nessus , if you are talking about on/off of the air then that is how it is suppose to be. You do not control the amount of air with the trigger, only the amount of paint. You will never get an Iwata in an "inbetween" position. You use a regulator or MAC valve to control the air.
 
Hmm. That seems odd. I mean, if that were true, valve spring tension wouldn't really matter. There'd be no point in mods like softer or clipped springs. One thing I've seen cited as a pro in several Badger reviews is triggers that have a continuous gradient in regards to the air, in contrast to Iwatas where the on/off feel is often framed as a caveat or a flaw. If one is always supposed to treat the air valve as an on/off button anyway, triggers with graduated valve handling would just be considered sloppy, and triggers with on/off feel would be considered desirable, but the opposite seems to be the case.
 
Softer springs are desired so that it takes less effort to keep the air and/or paint open. The springs are just strong enough to either shut the air or the paint. There is nobody on here or that I've come across that controls the air with the trigger.
 
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