Hole in the barrel?

M

Mark

Guest
Stupid newbie question here

Why do air brushes have the hole in the tail that exposes the needle holder thingy parts. Sorry to get all technical with my descriptions. Hope this makes sense.
 

Mr.Micron

Royal pain in the air hose
Admin
are you talking about the slot in the side of the handle where you can see the needle chuck? if so that is made so you do not have to take the handle off to pull back the needle in case of a clog
 
M

Madbrush

Guest
are you talking about the slot in the side of the handle where you can see the needle chuck? if so that is made so you do not have to take the handle off to pull back the needle in case of a clog

Are you sure about that?, in my own experience you can pull the back but you can't push it back into the nozzle without taking off the back piece, I thought it was to able to adjust the trigger spring tension.

The access you have to the needle seems to vary with different airbrushes, I'm not saying your wrong but none of mine have anywhere near enough room to do anything with the needle, when I loosen the needle chuck and move it backwards I can no longer even see the needle let alone move it.

The only difference I noticed between a closed or open back piece is there is less weight at the back if it's open, I think myself the only purpose of it being open is so you can see if your needle has become loose or not.
 

Seamonkey

Air-Valve Autobot!
I believe that's just so you can pull back on it just to give a big blast of paint and air at one time to clean the clogs. You can pull it back faster, smoother and straighter from that angle.
But Madbrush you are rite, I can't tell you how much time I waisted trying the same thing, lol!!!


Josh
 

JackEb

The Dragon Hunter
Staff member
Admin
If you're trying to clear a clogged nozzle, wouldn't using the trigger have the same result ? I've seen videos where people pull the chuck back to clear clogs, maybe it pulls back further than using the trigger allowing more air through clearing it quicker ?
Why would you need to change needle tensions while doing a job?
 

Seamonkey

Air-Valve Autobot!
@ JackEB Yeah it does do the same, but it does go back farther and faster.......hold on.. I'm painting now let me try.,......,, Just tried it and it works:) but you do shoot quit a bit of paint.


Josh
 

JackEb

The Dragon Hunter
Staff member
Admin
Painting and typing... I didn't think you blokes could do more than one thing at a time :)
Thanks for the answer.
This place has given me so much insight and knowledge it fantastic and I thank you all
 

Mr.Micron

Royal pain in the air hose
Admin
Are you sure about that?, in my own experience you can pull the back but you can't push it back into the nozzle without taking off the back piece, I thought it was to able to adjust the trigger spring tension.

The access you have to the needle seems to vary with different airbrushes, I'm not saying your wrong but none of mine have anywhere near enough room to do anything with the needle, when I loosen the needle chuck and move it backwards I can no longer even see the needle let alone move it.

The only difference I noticed between a closed or open back piece is there is less weight at the back if it's open, I think myself the only purpose of it being open is so you can see if your needle has become loose or not.
I am sure and I do not remember saying anything about loosing up the needle chuck , I said so you can pull back on the needle chuck when you have a clog. But no all airbrushes do not offer this feature .
The Paasche VL has a solid plastic handle that you have to remove to do this , But both my IWATA;s have this feature.
if you happened to have purchased one of the 3 in 1 handles for the IWATA's then you could also remove the needle with out taking the handle off at all.
I was giving a general answer to his question being he never stated what make of airbrush he has.
 

Mr.Micron

Royal pain in the air hose
Admin
@ JackEB Yeah it does do the same, but it does go back farther and faster.......hold on.. I'm painting now let me try.,......,, Just tried it and it works:) but you do shoot quit a bit of paint.


Josh
You forgot to add you were also having a sip of shine while typing and paint ...:D
 

Seamonkey

Air-Valve Autobot!
No drinking while painting!!! Don't want a D.U.P. I have been down that road and it ain't pretty!! Only celebration sips!! I really am painting and tried it, I'm trying to figure out clouds. I will post it later.


Josh
 
A

ad fez

Guest
ah I found a good tutorial somewhere for clouds, ill see if I can find it
 
M

Madbrush

Guest
I am sure and I do not remember saying anything about loosing up the needle chuck , I said so you can pull back on the needle chuck when you have a clog. But no all airbrushes do not offer this feature .
The Paasche VL has a solid plastic handle that you have to remove to do this , But both my IWATA;s have this feature.
if you happened to have purchased one of the 3 in 1 handles for the IWATA's then you could also remove the needle with out taking the handle off at all.
I was giving a general answer to his question being he never stated what make of airbrush he has.

If you look at your own original answer, you also didn't mention pulling back on the chuck, I only understood that's what you meant when I read Seamonkey's answer, therefore I do owe you an apology, I'm still new to all of this so excuse me if I'm a bit stupid sometimes.

I personally have got used to filtering my paint beforehand, and if I get a clog I blow back slightly then dump the paint and clean the brush before I put in new paint, one thing i have learned is that when you get one clog there are more to come, especially working for long periods and the paint dries in the cup, which is feature built into all H&S joke shop airbrushes.

I would rather throw away a little paint than risk damaging a very expensive nozzle by forcing dried paint through it.

And your absolutely right, when people ask for help, a little more info would save one hell of a lot of confusion and provide a more accurate answer.
 
M

Madbrush

Guest
Why would you need to change needle tensions while doing a job?

You don't need to change needle tension while doing a job, but if clean my equipment and then start something and suddenly realise the tension isn't to my liking I can adjust it without having to dismantle anything and simply carry on.

More tension stops me being heavy handed when doing detail and I generally loosen it for filling in, there are general rules for maintaining your equipment, but some of us also develop our own little tricks and habits which make us more comfortable.
 

JackEb

The Dragon Hunter
Staff member
Admin
You don't need to change needle tension while doing a job, but if clean my equipment and then start something and suddenly realise the tension isn't to my liking I can adjust it without having to dismantle anything and simply carry on.

More tension stops me being heavy handed when doing detail and I generally loosen it for filling in, there are general rules for maintaining your equipment, but some of us also develop our own little tricks and habits which make us more comfortable.

Hmmm, I've always thought of it as the same sort of thing as a drill chuck, it will work with different size needles and allow for inconsistancies of the main part of the needle
 
A

ad fez

Guest
Stupid newbie question here

Why do air brushes have the hole in the tail that exposes the needle holder thingy parts. Sorry to get all technical with my descriptions. Hope this makes sense.
hope this had cleared it up for you hahaha hahaha
 
Top