How can I fix the lines around the nose?

K

Kris Bates

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Hi I'm using wicked paints with a iwata HP C Plus. I have some lines on the left side of the nose that I'm really not happy with, just wondering if anyone knows of anyway I can remove them? Can I cover it with white?image.jpg
 
Being this is looks to be on paper , Just started adding textures and shadow. But you started out too dark on the layout with the stencil. You just want over reduced color and mist it in from 5 to 6 inches away . just enough so you can see the pattern. then freehand everything. and build your colors slowly.
 
Being this is looks to be on paper , Just started adding textures and shadow. But you started out too dark on the layout with the stencil. You just want over reduced color and mist it in from 5 to 6 inches away . just enough so you can see the pattern. then freehand everything. and build your colors slowly.

Thanks. I'll start a new one tomorrow and have a try at that. I might put this one away its my first attempt, hopefully it's all downhill from here
 
Mr Micron is correct. I recently started using wicked colors myself and they can be used out of the bottle but I have never used them without reducing them, especially the black. I have the wicked black, the jet black and the detail black. All of them will work for this but reduce them to make them more transparent so you can slow build your coverage and have smooth shadowing and blends. Also turn down your pressure the more you reduce the paint, it's a must and will make things easier. Get your paint reduced and pressure set to where you can do small dagger strokes quickly that are transparent. Wicked does tip dry even in reduced form so constantly clean your needle tip especially during tight detailed work. I reduce my black up to 1 part paint to 10 parts reducer. Hope this helps you out man. Best regards.
 
Mr Micron is correct. I recently started using wicked colors myself and they can be used out of the bottle but I have never used them without reducing them, especially the black. I have the wicked black, the jet black and the detail black. All of them will work for this but reduce them to make them more transparent so you can slow build your coverage and have smooth shadowing and blends. Also turn down your pressure the more you reduce the paint, it's a must and will make things easier. Get your paint reduced and pressure set to where you can do small dagger strokes quickly that are transparent. Wicked does tip dry even in reduced form so constantly clean your needle tip especially during tight detailed work. I reduce my black up to 1 part paint to 10 parts reducer. Hope this helps you out man. Best regards.

Thanks, I was getting a lot of tip dry, I cleaned the needle after every line I done or it just wouldn't spray when I wanted. I did have a couple drops of reducer in but I'll have a try with that ratio. I really need to work on building my colour slowly, I can't help but expect myself to do it in one shot with full coverage. Thanks for the advice everyone it all helps to get me in the rite direction
 
I do that ALL the time. I never reduce enough and always spray to dark. Need to work on that myself too. I have a question though, when u build up so lightly it seems to blur a lot. Like, if I do a dagger with straight black it's pretty sharp, but if I build it up in layers it's blurry cause of over spray. Anyway to be rid of this problem? Just stencil and mask a lot I guess?
 
I'm up in the shed at 6:30am on a Sunday because I've been thinking about trying again all night. I've reduced my paint to the ratio Godom recommend and turned my air pressure to 20psi. The paint is going on a lot softer, I'm trying to build it up slowly but I didn't think any paint hit the page when I dusted the stencil and it turned out this dark.image.jpg image.jpg
 
That is a great start, Just look at a reference for the shading and remember to not paint the areas you wish to show as high lights.
Yes when you are first starting out and you dust the paint on the first time you think you do not see anything.Just pull up the top two pieces of tape and pull the stencil away from the painting area. then you can see just how light or dark it is.
 
I do that ALL the time. I never reduce enough and always spray to dark. Need to work on that myself too. I have a question though, when u build up so lightly it seems to blur a lot. Like, if I do a dagger with straight black it's pretty sharp, but if I build it up in layers it's blurry cause of over spray. Anyway to be rid of this problem? Just stencil and mask a lot I guess?
Be sure to reduce pressure according to how thin your paint is reduced. The low pressure really helps with the blur and overspray and sometimes a freehand stencil or friskit is needed. I used to hear people call beginner murals blurals because of the blurry look which is usually from overspray from too much air pressure or not using masking when needed. I have done a few blurals myself back when I got started. I hope this helps. It's a fine line getting your paint reduced where you can build it slowly and lower your air pressure to where you can correct mistakes as you increase your paint coverage. Building coverage slowly opens you up to more overspray getting on your surrounding areas but with lower pressure the overspray problem is greatly reduced. I can run my Eclipse Bottom cup siphon BCS between 5 to 10 psi when I have my paint thinned just right and bottom cup siphons need more air pressure and people are told to use between 30 and 60 psi with the eclipse BCS which if you are running that pressure I definitely use some masking around your focus area. If I were using a gravity fed cup siphon I would probably be running lower than 5 psi with my paint reduced where I like it. Some instances call for quick saturated coverage and masking but for doing detail and photo realism use transparent color that you slowly build and correct your lines as you progress and be patient and above all enjoy yourself, if you get frustrated step away from it and return to it when you get that urge to create or correct. Hope this helps I just want to stress that reduced air pressure is as critical when it comes to using heavily reduced paint for slowly building detailed art work. Best regards
Greg Odom
 
By the way it is looking good too and 20 psi may be the correct pressure for the type of paint your using and the air brush your using. I think you will be a lot happier with how this one turns out compared to the first one. I used airbrush skulls all the time and still love doing them. Keep up the good work. Looks like it's coming along nicely, your paint looks very transparent but it still builds black coverage too which is what you want.
 
I'm a lot happier with how this one is turning out. What everyone is saying is making sense, it's all slowly clicking and rather than doing something because it's what's recommend I find I'm doing it because it's the easiest way for me.image.jpg
 
A easy way to control you values is to finish the whole image at about 10% intensity and slowly make it darker and darker as you go until you reach 100% value.
 
A easy way to control you values is to finish the whole image at about 10% intensity and slowly make it darker and darker as you go until you reach 100% value.

I see what you your talking about. I'll keep going with this one until I finish it than I'll try another one like that, thanks AndreZA.
 
I have to agree with AndreZA. Some people have the ability to work one section at a time to full tonal value, unfortunately I'm not one of them. All of the white space messes me up. Therefore, I have to get some tone on the entire thing before I can get the final values done (certainly I'm not an expert at this thought)
 
do you have an eraser to erase and make highlights?It makes it easy to keep the highlights white while building up the rest
 
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