Ideas for detailed masking

B

bruceg

Guest
Hi everyone. I'm trying to get some ideas on masking off detailed areas of parts.
I'm getting into painting custom firearms, and I need a way to mask off detailed parts to be spread seperate colors. The main component that needs to be kept in mind is that whatever I use to mask with has to be able to withstand heat as this paint has to be cured at 250 degrees fahrenheit.
I had thought about maybe silicone or something on the areas I don't want painted, but there's no way to apply silicone with any precision and get crisp lines, etc.
Any ideas?
 
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The recessed areas on this gun for example are something I'd like to figure out how to mask off to be sprayed a different color. (Not talking about the area cut all the way through.)
 
mask, spray, remove masking, bake but before all that how about going to the introductions page and giving us an explanation of who you are... strangers brandishing firearms are right up there with men in trench coats hanging around looking suspicious... :) Here is a link... http://www.airbrushforum.org/introductions/
Have a read off the nettiaquette as well... http://www.airbrushforum.org/threads/introducing-netiquette.8799/
We are a friendly bunch but appreciate finding out a bit about people to help them out.
 
Sorry I should have been more specific. I understand the process of what order to do it in. I guess what I'm asking is how can I go about cutting out the masking tape the exact dimensions I need and also, how can I get it crisp as I don't have a steady enough hand to cut those curves with the precision needed.
 
Sorry I should have been more specific. I understand the process of what order to do it in. I guess what I'm asking is how can I go.aboit cutting out the masking tape the exact dimensions I need and also, how can I get it crisp as I don't have a steady enough hand to cut those curves with the precision needed.
Sorry I should have been more specific... please do an introduction
 
Cheers for that... :) So what sort of design are you putting on it? Are you following the established lines or putting a different pattern over it? If silicon will do the trick, you can reduce it's viscosity (thin it down) using mineral turpentine (sometimes called white spirits - not to be confused with coleman fuel) and paint it on. As a general rule you don't want to be cutting on the surface you paint, especially if it is being heated in either the process or later use. REALLY skinny masking tape allows you to get tight curves and is available through automotive supplies. Does the paint you're using have some form of flash off (solvent evaporation) prior to curing? If so you can use a standard type tape, let it flash off and remove - or use a method called speed masking... a thin piece of tape at the painted edge, spray on, remove while wet and allow the edge to "heal" prior to curing.
 
Cheers for that... :) So what sort of design are you putting on it? Are you following the established lines or putting a different pattern over it? If silicon will do the trick, you can reduce it's viscosity (thin it down) using mineral turpentine (sometimes called white spirits - not to be confused with coleman fuel) and paint it on. As a general rule you don't want to be cutting on the surface you paint, especially if it is being heated in either the process or later use. REALLY skinny masking tape allows you to get tight curves and is available through automotive supplies. Does the paint you're using have some form of flash off (solvent evaporation) prior to curing? If so you can use a standard type tape, let it flash off and remove - or use a method called speed masking... a thin piece of tape at the painted edge, spray on, remove while wet and allow the edge to "heal" prior to curing.
I'd like to be able to just follow the existing lines just to make it a separate color. Perhaps very thin hi temp paint would do it for the curves. It would probably just take me a few tries to get it down.
 
Hm, someone just recommended play dough to fill the recessed areas.
I just wonder what it will do with the heat and if that will discolor the finish or anything.
 
Hm, someone just recommended play dough to fill the recessed areas.
I just wonder what it will do with the heat and if that will discolor the finish or anything.
Maybe... what are the specs on the paint? Can you post a link to the tech sheet?
 
I have hi temp tape. Problem is I have no way to cut said tape the identical dimensions I need.

That is a totally different series/product than we use.
The "H" series is what we use and I can assure you will NOT be dry without a 30 minute flash cure in the oven before applying stencils between colors.
 
OK. If I was going to mask out the indented areas I would use tape. It is tricky and for most it is a case of start practicing. It is fiddly but it can be done. Mask carefully around the vertical flats making sure you leave the ends plenty proud then close the open ends with another bit of tape. I would recommend removing the masking before heat curing to allow the edges to heal tidily and to prevent the paint pulling off post cure. You could try painting on a thin layer of the silicon in the area instead of tape but if you want to coat that area later that will be problematic. Not sure how it would remove after either.
 
OK. If I was going to mask out the indented areas I would use tape. It is tricky and for most it is a case of start practicing. It is fiddly but it can be done. Mask carefully around the vertical flats making sure you leave the ends plenty proud then close the open ends with another bit of tape. I would recommend removing the masking before heat curing to allow the edges to heal tidily and to prevent the paint pulling off post cure. You could try painting on a thin layer of the silicon in the area instead of tape but if you want to coat that area later that will be problematic. Not sure how it would remove after either.
Thanks, it's beginning to look more and more like tape is the answer and I'm just going to have to work with it.
 
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