If you would start with transparent line of colors

huskystafford

Needle chucking Ninja
Staff member
Admin
Mod
Think basic, what colours do you add to create a colour? With transparents you can use that theory to ‘shift’ a base colour on the substrate : yellow & blue will give a green shift, blue and red will give purple shift.

I use scrap paper and empty my brush on it, then I have a starting point to overlay other colours onto for different colours.
so whatever transparent you use over black, you won't cover it, black will still be visible. But does that black become more dirty,muddy,less vibrant?
 

JackEb

The Dragon Hunter
Staff member
Admin
The only way to paint over a dark colour is with an opaque (and a bleed check layer if the original black is paint ) White over black will give a blue shift, other light colours can make the black look muddy. Dark colours will barely be seen.
This doesn’t apply with Candies.
 

musicmacd

The Createx Bandit
There seems to be some confusion here on many levels -
Transparent vs Ooaque
Opaque covers anything, if lighter goes over darker you induce a shift so work light to dark to avoid issues.
Transparents always darken, but they’re see through like candy so use them for tinting and washes, (Transparent's are easier to erase than opaques but that’s another story)

Regarding what colours to buy, as Dave said, depends what you want to paint, but I would suggest the Createx Illustration colour wheel set (or the equivalent in another range). I see no point In Limiting yourself to primary colours when the paint costs less than a bubble tea to purchase.
something else that needs to be understood is that you can’t make any colour with primary paints, this is a myth, you can most certainly mix nearly every colour needed for PhotoRealism, which is usually desaturated pieces. If you draw a line between red/blue and yellow on the colour wheel you can theoretically make any colour inside the triangle but not outside it. I say theoretically because all paints have bias to warm or cooler version of itself, this will effect its ability to make certain tones, ie - a lemon yellow vs a sunset yellow will result in a vastly different spectrum of colours.
This subject fascinates me and I’m happy to answer questions, I’m my class I go over and demonstrate this more than anything, when you understand colour theory the world opens. It’s sooooo simple too, but that doesn’t make it easy to understand, as usual, we humans make it more hard in our own heads :)
 

SiRoxx

Party Boy UK Style
Staff member
Mod
There seems to be some confusion here on many levels -
Transparent vs Ooaque
Opaque covers anything, if lighter goes over darker you induce a shift so work light to dark to avoid issues.
Transparents always darken, but they’re see through like candy so use them for tinting and washes, (Transparent's are easier to erase than opaques but that’s another story)

Regarding what colours to buy, as Dave said, depends what you want to paint, but I would suggest the Createx Illustration colour wheel set (or the equivalent in another range). I see no point In Limiting yourself to primary colours when the paint costs less than a bubble tea to purchase.
something else that needs to be understood is that you can’t make any colour with primary paints, this is a myth, you can most certainly mix nearly every colour needed for PhotoRealism, which is usually desaturated pieces. If you draw a line between red/blue and yellow on the colour wheel you can theoretically make any colour inside the triangle but not outside it. I say theoretically because all paints have bias to warm or cooler version of itself, this will effect its ability to make certain tones, ie - a lemon yellow vs a sunset yellow will result in a vastly different spectrum of colours.
This subject fascinates me and I’m happy to answer questions, I’m my class I go over and demonstrate this more than anything, when you understand colour theory the world opens. It’s sooooo simple too, but that doesn’t make it easy to understand, as usual, we humans make it more hard in our own heads :)
Thanks for the input Mac. Really appreciate you sharing your knowledge.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

huskystafford

Needle chucking Ninja
Staff member
Admin
Mod
A wash is like glazing colour. So similar to what I did with the skull. The Sepia was sprayed lightly over the white to colour it darker while still seeing all the detail of what’s underneath.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
thank you :)
 

Karl Becker

Mac-Valve Maestro!
Sounds like the issue here is understanding the colors first, then approaching the opaque/transparent/candy part of it.

Once you get the color theory part, the rest is just deciding what type of paint best fits the project at hand. :)
 

huskystafford

Needle chucking Ninja
Staff member
Admin
Mod
Sounds like the issue here is understanding the colors first, then approaching the opaque/transparent/candy part of it.

Once you get the color theory part, the rest is just deciding what type of paint best fits the project at hand. :)
the worst part is I am reading these threads about colors from the day I joined forum... I do have one transparent color. Burnt sienna. I should probably just try it and my brains should remember more from my attempts of spraying then from reading. I hope. :D
 

JackEb

The Dragon Hunter
Staff member
Admin
the worst part is I am reading these threads about colors from the day I joined forum... I do have one transparent color. Burnt sienna. I should probably just try it and my brains should remember more from my attempts of spraying then from reading. I hope. :D
colour theory and the transparent vs opaque confuses a lot or people. All I can say is all the theory is here on the forum but nothing beats good old trial and error.
Spray a few different opaques, then spray your transparent over them, some with one pass some with multiple and you'll soon get an idea of how the transparent works.
as for colour theory ... you and I are in the same boat, I have sort of an idea but if I was asked to match a colour already on my work (to fix a mistake) then I'd be in trouble.
 

Kim McCann

Mac-Valve Maestro!
For a beginner, opaque colors are easier to learn on, by far. This is just down to color mixing. When you mix opaque colors in a cup, what shows up in the cup is going to be a close approximation of what you see on the support when you spray it. It makes it easy to learn color theory and the characteristics of your paint. Also when you spray, there is literally no risk of overshooting the target color. Even if you completely blast it, the color maxes out at what you mixed.

With transparent, yes, you can get a much more saturated or intense color, BUT, the mix in the cup will always be much darker or more saturated than what you spray. My go to skin tone mix for example, when mixed in the bottle is a gross dark brown with a purple hue (mostly burnt umber and red/violet). On the page it starts as a medium flesh tone. So when mixing you really, really have to know the characteristics of your paint, and be prepared to do a lot of test sprays. The color in the cup is NOT going to be very close to the color sprayed, except maybe pure yellow. Also, with transparent the more you add, the darker it gets, so it is SUPER easy to overshoot your color.

Transparents are much, much more flexible and eye popping, but they come with a steep learning curve. Transparents are my go to for 90% of my work, because I can rapidly turn them into semi-opaque with a drop or two of white, and I learned the hard way to not overshoot so much. But for someone starting out that wants to see the color they mix in their cup be the color they see on the page, go opaques.

Besides, light brush work, adding a transparent base and so on can give you most of what you want from transparents.

Transparents for the beginner are best used watered down to "tint" work previously laid down.

That's my two cents.
 

JackEb

The Dragon Hunter
Staff member
Admin
For a beginner, opaque colors are easier to learn on, by far. This is just down to color mixing. When you mix opaque colors in a cup, what shows up in the cup is going to be a close approximation of what you see on the support when you spray it. It makes it easy to learn color theory and the characteristics of your paint. Also when you spray, there is literally no risk of overshooting the target color. Even if you completely blast it, the color maxes out at what you mixed.

With transparent, yes, you can get a much more saturated or intense color, BUT, the mix in the cup will always be much darker or more saturated than what you spray. My go to skin tone mix for example, when mixed in the bottle is a gross dark brown with a purple hue (mostly burnt umber and red/violet). On the page it starts as a medium flesh tone. So when mixing you really, really have to know the characteristics of your paint, and be prepared to do a lot of test sprays. The color in the cup is NOT going to be very close to the color sprayed, except maybe pure yellow. Also, with transparent the more you add, the darker it gets, so it is SUPER easy to overshoot your color.

Transparents are much, much more flexible and eye popping, but they come with a steep learning curve. Transparents are my go to for 90% of my work, because I can rapidly turn them into semi-opaque with a drop or two of white, and I learned the hard way to not overshoot so much. But for someone starting out that wants to see the color they mix in their cup be the color they see on the page, go opaques.

Besides, light brush work, adding a transparent base and so on can give you most of what you want from transparents.

Transparents for the beginner are best used watered down to "tint" work previously laid down.

That's my two cents.
Maybe that’s where I went wrong lol I started with Transparents and spent a lot of time tearing my hair out. To this day I rarely use opaques but I do have them.
 
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