Needle bent just turning in Combitool! Anyone had this?

M

Melbee

Guest
Hi Folks,
I have a drill where the batteries are constantly loosing power and have to be charged just before I use it which is really annoying when I want to do something on the fly. I was using it to polish my needles and it worked fine except for the battery issue, having to hold down the "on" button and it gets heavy after a while.

So to combat this I bought some smaller collets for my Ferm (Dremel like) Combitool which has an on/off switch which doesn't have to be held down and has 1 to 6 speed control.

I put the needle in with one of the new collets and it fit brilliantly, I had speed control at 2 and turned it on. To my horror the needle bent within seconds at the base where it fit in the Combitool!!

Is this to be expected?

On retrospect I should have started it on speed 1 but now I'm too scared to put in another needle in case it does it again. My old drill does have touch control as well as speed control so if I only press the on button slightly it will turn slowly and builds up speed the more I press it. The Combitool has speed control but is just on or off. It is also mains powered and very light compared to the drill which is why I wanted to use it instead. I'm very disappointed.

Does anyone know of a way I could get it to work?
Could I hold the needle gently against the fine sandpaper before I turn it on?
Or should I just bin the idea and go back to the drill?

Any insight will help
Cheers Mel
 
Lol Mel, Been there and done that, my needle looked like the letter S. I have used my Dremel again but I was uber careful, holding the tip of the needle in some cloth before I switched on the slowest speed. I have since then got myself a new cordless drill with variable speed. Lee
 
Sorry to hear that Mel. I polish mine by hand.

I wet sand with the following....(assuming there has been some damage to the needle, if not I just go to the last step)
1000 Grit - Until al blemishes are gone
1500
2000
2500

I then get some jewelers rouge on a rag and polish.

I put the sandpaper on a flat hardwood board. I put the tapered part of the needle on the sandpaper and press on it with my thumb. This will lift up the other end of the needle, keeping the needle at the correct taper. I then rotate the needle with the thumb and index finger of my other hand while pulling back slowly. I do this for every grit of sandpaper and the same with the rouge. I only used power tools once, for me it altered the taper on the needle, so I stopped doing it. Polishing a needle is just like stropping a razor blade, once it's already honed(wet sanded), it takes very little too keep the edge. Power tools are over kill in my opinion when it comes to polishing.
 
Lol Mel, Been there and done that, my needle looked like the letter S. I have used my Dremel again but I was uber careful, holding the tip of the needle in some cloth before I switched on the slowest speed. I have since then got myself a new cordless drill with variable speed. Lee

Cheers Lee, at least I know I'm not alone on that one, back to the old cordless drill then with variable speed but annoying power loosing batteries. It's not like I polish needles every day. Hoo Hum.

Sorry to hear that Mel. I polish mine by hand.

I wet sand with the following....(assuming there has been some damage to the needle, if not I just go to the last step)
1000 Grit - Until al blemishes are gone
1500
2000
2500

I then get some jewelers rouge on a rag and polish.

I put the sandpaper on a flat hardwood board. I put the tapered part of the needle on the sandpaper and press on it with my thumb. This will lift up the other end of the needle, keeping the needle at the correct taper. I then rotate the needle with the thumb and index finger of my other hand while pulling back slowly. I do this for every grit of sandpaper and the same with the rouge. I only used power tools once, for me it altered the taper on the needle, so I stopped doing it. Polishing a needle is just like stropping a razor blade, once it's already honed(wet sanded), it takes very little too keep the edge. Power tools are over kill in my opinion when it comes to polishing.

Thanks for the info jagardn, I'll give that a try. I have 1000, 2000 and 3000 wet'n'dry sandpaper, Brasso metal polish and yesterday I bought a Wet Stone and some Metal Polishing Compond so I think I'm covered :) The polishing compound is from Dremel and is a reddish colour, is that what you call Rouge?

It's good to be aware that I could be doing more damage than good with the power tools.

My main reason for just polishing rather than fixing damage to needles is a darkened area that appears where the needle touches the nozzle and that seems to attract tip dry. It happens on both my Iwata's and my Olympos, less so on my Sotar needles. I'm presuming this is a common problem.
Cheers Mel
 
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Cheers Lee, at least I know I'm not alone on that one, back to the old cordless drill then with variable speed but annoying power loosing batteries. It's not like I polish needles every day. Hoo Hum.



I'll give that a try jagardn. I have 1000, 2000 and 3000 wet'n'dry sandpaper, Brasso metal polish and yesterday I bought a Wet Stone and some Metal Polishing Compond so I think I'm covered :) The polishing compound is from Dremel and is a reddish colour, is that what you call Rouge?

It's good to be aware that I could be doing more damage than good with the power tools.

Mel,
You should be good with the red stuff, it will probably work better than Brasso.
Here is the stuff I bought, it's enough to last a few generations. LOL

1 lb. Jewelers Rouge Polishing Compound - Amazon.com
 
On your battery issue ,, this goes for power drills, laptops, cell phones and anything else that uses rechargeable batteries...

When you first get them fully charge them and run them until they are DEAD.... Rechargeable batteries keep a memory , so if you are the type of person who uses the drill for ten minutes and when finished throws the battery on the charger , That is all the work time you will get out of it. same with cell phones and mp3 players..

I have a rechargeable drill that the battery is still the one that came with it ten years ago and still gives me 8 hours of work time...
 
On your battery issue ,, this goes for power drills, laptops, cell phones and anything else that uses rechargeable batteries...

When you first get them fully charge them and run them until they are DEAD.... Rechargeable batteries keep a memory , so if you are the type of person who uses the drill for ten minutes and when finished throws the battery on the charger , That is all the work time you will get out of it. same with cell phones and mp3 players..

I have a rechargeable drill that the battery is still the one that came with it ten years ago and still gives me 8 hours of work time...

Thanks Herb, I am aware of this and I did fully charge them before I used them but to be honest I have no idea if I ran the batteries down to absolutely dead before I recharged them the first time. I will have run them down though.

My main problem with the batteries is not the amount of time I can use them for, it is that they loose power in storage. This means I have to recharge the batteries BEFORE I can use them almost every time. It depends how much time has elapsed, if it's a few weeks then it might be ok, any longer and the battery will only last a short while or be dead already and need to be charged before I can do anything. The recharging takes about 4 hours and I am not a patient person.

It was a cheap drill and I presume if I invested in a Black'n'Decker drill I wouldn't have this problem. But I have the nagging feeling that even if I spent €100 instead of €50 the batteries would still do this.
Cheers Mel
 
I'm too scared to polish my needle full stop, my motto is if it aint broke don't fix it. Others might suggest I'm just too chicken excrement to try it Lol, but I prefer my version of events. So no help here Mel I'm afraid.
 
I'm too scared to polish my needle full stop, my motto is if it aint broke don't fix it. Others might suggest I'm just too chicken excrement to try it Lol, but I prefer my version of events. So no help here Mel I'm afraid.
likewise....
 
i would imagine the rpm of the dremelish tool is to high mel probably spinning around 1000-1500 rpm even onlowest setting, plus its almost instantly at that speed so its the torque that bent the needle i would imagine.

stick to your battery drill i would think that spins about 500rpm a bit more manageable for such a thin soft needle
 
I'm too scared to polish my needle full stop, my motto is if it aint broke don't fix it. Others might suggest I'm just too chicken excrement to try it Lol, but I prefer my version of events. So no help here Mel I'm afraid.

Hi Squishy, I'm with you on the "if it aint broke don't fix it" motto except I was always breaking (bending) my needles!

At first I was taking the needle cap off and being a clutz I'd ding it and being an absolute skinflint (don't want to buy a new one every week) I quickly learned the skill of fixing and polishing dinged needles :) I've now modified my Crown caps so I can protect my needle tips from ME!! but I like to polish the needles (now I know how) if I think it's going to help with tip dry. I don't do it often.
Cheers Mel
 
i would imagine the rpm of the dremelish tool is to high mel probably spinning around 1000-1500 rpm even onlowest setting, plus its almost instantly at that speed so its the torque that bent the needle i would imagine.

stick to your battery drill i would think that spins about 500rpm a bit more manageable for such a thin soft needle

Yeah! I think your right there ad fez. Back to square one Ha Ha Ha! "When you gotta learn, ja gotta learn" Well I think I can safely say "I learnt" :)
 
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