New Old T&C model A brush pair

2Diverse

Stick a fork in him, he's done.
As some know on here I have a thing for Thayer & Chandler model A airbrushes. Suffice to say I have a few. I recently came across this pair. I wanted the one with the wheel behind the trigger the most as it will match a TC model B I have. It is not a typical model A. I took them apart and cleaned them as well as I can, the chrome is worn off on both. From what I know the triggers and handles were switched so during reassembly I changed them to what I believe to be correct going by other brushes I have from the same era. This is a pic from the listing:

tcduoa06.jpg


I installed new air valve seals in both as they no longer had one, just a few tiny chunks. I put a new needle and nozzle in the typical brush (top one).

After cleaning:

tcduoa01.jpg
tcduoa02.jpg

The top brush is missing the trigger adjusting post and screw. Not a big deal to me. On a typical A the screw pushes the trigger back so a predetermined amount of paint will flow when the trigger is depressed. The wheel moves the needle backwards. It accomplishes the same goal.They look similar with the wheel tube removed. The difference between the two:

tcduoa03.jpg
tcduoa05.jpg


The wheeled brush has a much smaller regulator (air cap). It's about half the size of a typical A regulator. The needle is also a tad shorter. I'm thinking it should produce some very fine lines.

tcduoa04.jpg


I did a test piece with it on a 4" x 6" index card. Bear in mind I don't know the brush yet and I'm way out of practice. I test with Dr PH Martin Bombay India ink (grass green) at about 10 psi. I am getting some spidering so I will try lowering the air pressure a bit. I'm still trying to learn this low air pressure thing. The spray lines are achieved by turning out the regulator. Usually between 2-1/2 to 3 turns. I am going to test the wheeled brush again on a bigger sheet of paper to see if I can find the sweet spot. Once I do I will set it with a sliver of melted beeswax.

tcduoa08.jpg

I love the feel of the trigger on the wheeled brush. It's very comfortable and easy to use. From what I know both of these brushes should be around 100 years old. I believe the trigger style on the wheeled brush ended around 1925. I'm pretty sure I put them in their correct case. The typical As case is rough.

A pic with my model B:

tcduoa07.jpg
 
What a gorgeous pair!
I did not know there were As with the wheel. I thought that would make it a B. Cool!
Wow 10 psi! That's very unusual for me.
Enjoy!

Thanks,
Ismael
 
What a gorgeous pair!
I did not know there were As with the wheel. I thought that would make it a B. Cool!
Wow 10 psi! That's very unusual for me.
Enjoy!

Thanks,
Ismael


I have never seen an A like this either. I find it curious that it does have an A at the end of the serial number. If the standard A was in production at the same time what/how was it differentiated between the two? It's a good thing all this old AB information is so easy to find...not.

There is a size difference between the A and B. The B is about twice the diameter. It needs a reducer to get the air connected to use a standard TC hose.

tcduoa09.jpg
 
I'm pretty sure the handle helps to put the wheeled brush in the between >1913 or 14 and <1925 range. I have a copy of the patent for the trigger and adjustment mechanism, which was granted to OC Wold - but not produced on Wold brushes (that I know of). I'll dig it out as it will help date the brush. I do remember that I was able to date this TC Model A to prior to 1910 -

pre1910 TC A_1.jpg
 
I see!
So the wheel was in the A and B presumably at the same time?
So, is the C the bottom feed version of the B? and the E the single action version of the C? (and the genetic father of the Badger 200)
Was there a Model D? I don't recall ever seeing one.
I should have worked for ToolAncestry.com lol

Thanks,
Ismael
 
hehehe, the C is larger yet (and yes, bottom feed) - and there was a Model E (I don't recall a D)...
 
The wheeled one you posted has quite a few noticeable differences Dave.

It has the non removable head, serial number on the side, bayonet style needle/nozzle guard, at least one slot on the bottom and the cap on the end of the handle. Was there anything under the cap? Does it have Thayer & Chandler stamped into the handle?

Beautiful brush!
 
The wheeled one you posted has quite a few noticeable differences Dave.

It has the non removable head, serial number on the side, bayonet style needle/nozzle guard, at least one slot on the bottom and the cap on the end of the handle. Was there anything under the cap? Does it have Thayer & Chandler stamped into the handle?

Beautiful brush!
yes, it is an older version, (short lived variation of the model A). It smacks of a Wold design/build, but everything is sized for TC. Thayer Chandler info is stamped into the handle - nothing under the cap, which was a Burdick influence. I believe this was his (Wolds) proofing of the patent parts incorporated in the needle adjustment and trigger layout. As stated, the patent was submitted by, and awarded to Wold, although he was working for TC at the time.
 
So was the wheeled version produced first, before the design of what is more or less the standard A model?

Wold must have carried over the TC threads as all the Wold brushes I have will work with a TC/Badger hose. I recently got some larger bodied Wolds but no reducer. I took the reducer from my model B above and it screws right on. I can use a standard TC/Badger hose with that setup.
 
No, not first - but a model variation within the production run - changes were not uncommon in the first couple of decades. Wold was the production manager for TC even while starting his own company (maybe for @20+ years). Commonalities between the manufacturing would be kind of normal, I would think. For what it is worth, most of the brushes produced in Chicago all used similar thread sizes for the air valve for at least some time. Some of my early Paasches use the same #10X60tpi thread as TC, Binks and now Badger. The larger bodied brushes (TC Model B, Wold Master, etc.) - were/are 1/4"x60tpi.
 
It just seems odd to me that they used the same model name. Unless they ceased production of the standard brush to make a run of the wheeled ones. Then again, what do I know about early airbrush corporate decisions.

Thank you for the thread pitch sizes. That may come in handy:thumbsup:

Speaking of Binks, do you know how early they started producing airbrushes? I'm only familiar with the Wren and the two Raven's. I'd guess maybe around the late 50s/early60s although the Wren is similar to the Paasche H. It may have been earlier.
 
It looks to me like they were tweaking and changing all the time in the early days (decades). Especially anything touched by Wold. He seems to have always been looking to improve, or push the envelope.

I do not know much about the timeline of the Binks pieces. They started with industrial spray equipment, and I think they offered the airbrushes as a small niche thing. I don't recall the Ravens much beyond the 1980's (later 80's at that). I would be surprised if they were produced for more than a decade. The wrens have been around for quite some time, seemingly completely unchanged
 
The Binks Wren "A" and "C" were discontinued before 2015 but you can still get the "B" brand new today. It looks the same except it is no longer golden color but natural metal. I think they are aluminum. But they are pricey! Amazon is listing it for $370!!!!
 
It looks like the "nose" may be a bit longer. Hard to say as everyone seems to be using the same stock pic. I have a few so I'm good.
 
I may stand corrected about the Wren. I think it is the same design that it has always been. It's just the pic they used that made me think other-wise. It's only overpriced by about $300 then, at least to me.

I bought my first one around 1976/1977 so they were available then.
 
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