Overspray

Z

ZeroKewl

Guest
Hello all,
I could use some advice on how to cut down on or eliminate an overspray issue that I am having. I am using a Iwata HP-CH and a Grex Genesis.XG, with Createx wicked paints at 40 o 50 psi. I am getting alot of fine misting overspray with both brushes, and it happens whether or not I am reducing the paint with Createx reducer. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
There are a number of this to reduce this:

1. Reduce your air pressure (to between 10 and 20 psi) and dilute your paint more - try mix ratios of 1 paint : 10 or 20 water / reducer
2. Use stencils or drawing curves to block overspray - if you hold them against the surface you get hard lines, if you lift them up away from the surface a little, you get softer lines
3. Or use your hand (with which you can form various shapes) to block overspray, although some type of paints aren't good for your health

The reducing of air pressure and diluting of paint should be done simultaneously to result in the desired effect.

Hope this helps.
 
Thank you ignis I appreciate the advice and I will give it a try today. I will let you know how I get on.
Thanks again
 
You can also keep your airbrush closer to the surface and point the airbrush away from the area you want to keep clean. Remember an airbrush sprays in a round cone pattern, so the closer you keep it to the surface, the smaller the cone pattern and less overspray. By pointing the airbrush away from the area you want to keep clean, you are redirecting the cone pattern.
 
There are a number of this to reduce this:

1. Reduce your air pressure (to between 10 and 20 psi) and dilute your paint more - try mix ratios of 1 paint : 10 or 20 water / reducer
2. Use stencils or drawing curves to block overspray - if you hold them against the surface you get hard lines, if you lift them up away from the surface a little, you get softer lines
3. Or use your hand (with which you can form various shapes) to block overspray, although some type of paints aren't good for your health

The reducing of air pressure and diluting of paint should be done simultaneously to result in the desired effect.

Hope this helps.


might be a silll question but (try mix ratios of 1 paint : 10 or 20 water / reducer) i dont understand how this is messured ?
 
might be a silll question but (try mix ratios of 1 paint : 10 or 20 water / reducer) i dont understand how this is messured ?

1ml paint with 10ml water/reducer or 1ml paint with 20 ml water, therefore 10 or 20 times more thinner than paint.
 
thanks cleared that up wasent sure if we was counting drops or mesureing ^^
 
thanks cleared that up wasent sure if we was counting drops or mesureing ^^


Counting drops is the same 1 drop paint and 10 or 20 drops thinner.

Over thinning is an ideal way to both eliminate to some extent over-spray and allow for a gradual build up of layers, keeps your work clean and stops you going too dark too quick, it's ideal if like me you prefer to work freehand.
 
Ok here goes ,all of the above will drastically reduce your problem of overspray .I used to use normal compressed air fed guns in my work on vehicles until about 3 years ago . i switched to using turbine power which IMHO reduces overspray by 90% .The key thing here is that they use very low psi 10 psi max . This proves the above statements about using less psi ,but you must thin more the lower the psi used .Lower psi also allows you to blend colours better and fade outs especially if using metallics etc . This will also help with tip dry if it has been an issue for you . I use trident water based paints and automotive from my paint schemes with very little overspray .Have a play around until you find a set up that suits you .
 
Let me start by saying that I have no idea what I'm saying here - I've been gathering a lot of information while trying to re-learn this skill...

I like what's said above. I think thinning and lower air pressure is the way to go. But what if you need more opacity out of your paint/ink? say for color coverup or whatever. Could you 1) reduce your air pressure, 2) reduce paint by half as much as stated above (say 5:1 ratio) and change the tip/needle size (go up one size)?

I ask because I had always been under the assumption that needle/tip size greatly effected spray patten size, but read recently that needle/tip size had more to do with paint/ink viscosity...

Oh - and I'll add this - check your angle on how your brush is lined up with your media. I was getting crazy overspray while practicing the other night and realized that I was getting lazy and going at the paper at a ridiculous angle (and my air pressure was too high...) seems like a basic thing, but I overlook simple answers like that ALL the time. I've practically ruined my career on a lifetime of doing that sort of thing :highly_amused:
 
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i use to like to do eyes and lips first on portraits but now i tend to work on any high detail small areas last i just finished an owl its hanging at a local coffee house in patchogue i did the eyes first and had to rework them after painting the white feathers in yo could try stenciling but be very careful
 
Let me start by saying that I have no idea what I'm saying here - I've been gathering a lot of information while trying to re-learn this skill...

I like what's said above. I think thinning and lower air pressure is the way to go. But what if you need more opacity out of your paint/ink? say for color coverup or whatever. Could you 1) reduce your air pressure, 2) reduce paint by half as much as stated above (say 5:1 ratio) and change the tip/needle size (go up one size)?

I ask because I had always been under the assumption that needle/tip size greatly effected spray patten size, but read recently that needle/tip size had more to do with paint/ink viscosity...

Oh - and I'll add this - check your angle on how your brush is lined up with your media. I was getting crazy overspray while practicing the other night and realized that I was getting lazy and going at the paper at a ridiculous angle (and my air pressure was too high...) seems like a basic thing, but I overlook simple answers like that ALL the time. I've practically ruined my career on a lifetime of doing that sort of thing :highly_amused:

Im not a pro since i also only started out half a year ago, but the needle and nozzle size will also affect the size of the spray pattern. A bigger nozzle needle setup can cover up a larger area
faster and better then a small setup, but when it comes to details a small setup has the advantage again. But the thickness of the paint also comes to play alot now. If your paint is too thick
the small nozzle can not get any details at all since its clocking up, spitting and so on. The bigger nozzle can still spray thicker paint to a degree, thats why T-shirt artist mostly use bottom
feed airbrushes with 0.5mm setup to spray paint right out of the bottle without thinning it down. A common rule is as i learned if you wanna do small details then you have to thinn out your
paint pretty much and use less air pressure. And if you need a better coverage then you can use a less reduction for the paint and a higher pressure, but its hard to do details like that.
You can also always use some freehand shields or masking to avoid overspray. And there are alot of different paint brands out there too, so the reduction ratios vary alot. Some paints
you can even spray with a 0.2mm nozzle and smaller right out of the bottle, some others need a reduction of 1:5 to spray at all and for detailing even higher.
As i seen you are going to be more into illustrating, i would suggest you have a look into E´tac, Medea Com-art, Holbein aeroflash colors since they are mostly used for illustrations.
 
Im not a pro since i also only started out half a year ago, but the needle and nozzle size will also affect the size of the spray pattern. A bigger nozzle needle setup can cover up a larger area
faster and better then a small setup, but when it comes to details a small setup has the advantage again. But the thickness of the paint also comes to play alot now. If your paint is too thick
the small nozzle can not get any details at all since its clocking up, spitting and so on. The bigger nozzle can still spray thicker paint to a degree, thats why T-shirt artist mostly use bottom
feed airbrushes with 0.5mm setup to spray paint right out of the bottle without thinning it down. A common rule is as i learned if you wanna do small details then you have to thinn out your
paint pretty much and use less air pressure. And if you need a better coverage then you can use a less reduction for the paint and a higher pressure, but its hard to do details like that.
You can also always use some freehand shields or masking to avoid overspray. And there are alot of different paint brands out there too, so the reduction ratios vary alot. Some paints
you can even spray with a 0.2mm nozzle and smaller right out of the bottle, some others need a reduction of 1:5 to spray at all and for detailing even higher.
As i seen you are going to be more into illustrating, i would suggest you have a look into E´tac, Medea Com-art, Holbein aeroflash colors since they are mostly used for illustrations.

I sat down and put my money where my mouth was the other night and you're right. I moved up to the larger needle/tip and immediately saw a big difference in what I could get out of the vjr. The smaller needle that I have (not sure of the size - in Paasche terms it's a "1" - lol. very precise) is damaged/bent/a hot mess and I'm going out today to try to find a replacement at the local art supply store.

I'll look around for your recommendations - thank you. Right now I am just playing with ink, black at that. The first ink I ran was FW. They have changed a lot over the years - most are not completely transparent like a traditional ink and they are acrylic based. They are more lightfast, but you can't layer them the way you used to (with the acrylic base, more of the ink rides on the top surface of the paper - traditional inks soak in. with that, as you work and start layering you wind up lifting and moving the first layers that you have put down because even though it's acrylic, it hasn't dried 100% - this is with a traditional brush. I need to test it out, but I'm wondering if the colors will blend/mix and muddy with an air brush.)

The second ink that I ran was a standard black india ink that's formulated for technical pens. That stuff is perfect. The FW ink isn't all that thick, but it's got a heavier viscosity than the Koh-I-Noor ink. I think it at about a 1:1 ratio and it does okay, just isn't as impressive as the tech pen black.

What I plan on doing media-wise is using most of what I am already working with - which at this point is technical pens, FW ink, Copic markers and honestly whatever else I can find (lol) - I've gotten some hot press water color paper recently and plan on incorporating more watercolor into my work as well.

That in mind, I think my concerns about opacity might be coming from a totally different perspective. I'm already working with a relatively transparent paint so I'm thinking "ah! thin it down more?" ha ha.
 
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