Paasche Talon. Whats your insight?

N

Nathan

Guest
Hello,
I just started airbrushing a few days ago and for my first AB I bought a Paasche Talon, dual action, gravity feed. I would say I like it and its a good AB, but I have never laid hands on another one. I have trouble with it spraying for a second then stopping until I move the trigger to a different spot, of course im just a newbie so it might be expected or could it be the gun? Thats a whole other discussion though. So, i'm wondering if I should continue to learn on it or purchase an ever so popular Iwata. Please share your ideas and thoughts about this AB.​
 
Mainly what you are having is learning issues , Paint reduction , air pressure and control .
But like most you only gave us a small bit of information.
What type of compressor are you using?
What air pressure ?
What paint brand?
Which tip , I know the paasche talon comes with a couple of set ups.
But like I say so many time the more information you can provide the more we can help get you on the right track.
Oh How about a little introduction in the introduction section to tells us more about you ,What country /State you live in , what is your goal at learning the airbrush. IE automotive , t-shirts , Kicks, or anything and everything you is paintable.
 
Did not notice that section, but yes I can give a little info about myself. First off, I use a homemade silent compressor with 2 gallon air tank. Regulator, water/air filter etc. etc. Approx 1-2 CFM (My Guess). I have tried 5 to 60 PSI and seem to get the same results. Im using applebarns acrylic paint from wally world (I understand about the paint difference just wanted to practice with something cheap) thinned with water to a good milk consistency with very little paint separation from water. Just swapped from the .38mm to .25mm. trying to achieve those ultra fine lines. When I really get into it, my brain starts thinking of ideas like i'm some airbrush vet, until i fail and snap back to newbie phase. hahaha. I did not post details about the problem because I thought this would have been in the wrong section, but thank you very much for your fast response and guidance.
 
Did not notice that section, but yes I can give a little info about myself. First off, I use a homemade silent compressor with 2 gallon air tank. Regulator, water/air filter etc. etc. Approx 1-2 CFM (My Guess). I have tried 5 to 60 PSI and seem to get the same results. Im using applebarns acrylic paint from wally world (I understand about the paint difference just wanted to practice with something cheap) thinned with water to a good milk consistency with very little paint separation from water. Just swapped from the .38mm to .25mm. trying to achieve those ultra fine lines. When I really get into it, my brain starts thinking of ideas like i'm some airbrush vet, until i fail and snap back to newbie phase. hahaha. I did not post details about the problem because I thought this would have been in the wrong section, but thank you very much for your fast response and guidance.

Well the paint you are using is not designed for airbrush , It is a thicker paint and if you filter it you will see some good sized chunks in it. Which is part of your trouble.
I assuming since you mentioned Wallyville aka Wal-Mart that you live in the US, Do you have a hobby lobby or a Michael's crafts in your town?
Print there 40% off coupon and go buy at least on bottle of actual airbrush paint.
It will surprise you of how much difference just that will make.
Wicked (hobby lobby) Spectra-tex (michael's) the spectra-tex is thin enough that through the .38 set up no thinning should be needed. The wicked you can either buy a bottle of the wicked reducer W100 or W500 which ever one they carry .
With the wicked 1 drop paint to 3 drops reducer is a good starting point. Check to see how that flows , @ about 30/35 PSI .
 
Thank you very much, will definitely give that a try tonight.
 
For the moment i wouldnt mess with the 2.5 setup. I have both and use the .38 and get some damn fine lines with it. Like Micron said go get just 1 bottle of ab paint and reducer and you will see the difference. Use some panty hose or some filters to filter the applebarn paint and you might get a bit more useability out of it. Apart from that its just lots of practise. Good luck with your ab'ing.

Lee
 
i have a talon,and i know that it can be once in a while a little tricky,but most of the time is a really good gun.so if you are trying to doreally fine lines you should go to a relation of 1 to 10 paint reducer in order to achieve that,obviously with the .25 needle!also if you wish to be insanely detalied you can buy the the .2 needle from the mojo 3 series,it works insanely!!!

hope this helps!!!:loyal:
 
Hello,
I have trouble with it spraying for a second then stopping until I move the trigger to a different spot
It might not be anything else but the AB. I have an Iwata Custom Micron, an Iwata Eclipse, a Paasche VLN, and this Paasche Talon. My talon is by far the worst performing AB i have ever used. I push all kinds of paints and pigments and some very reduced ratios. HOK, Createx, Urethane, Water based, Acrylic, Alcohol based and my talon has always exhibited very poor spray control. I did not want to give up on it though and I ordered new nozzles, tips, and needles. Nothing has helped this AB perform well. I thought I would keep it around just for spraying large areas with the 0.66mm needle and fan cap. But no matter how much torque I put on the nozzle and tip it still keeps bubbling in the cup. I was once a Paasche supporter, however, my Iwatas are always on point. I keep the Talon around to remind me that not all AB's are equal. Look into an Iwata Eclipse. Similar price and, in my opinion, amazing craftsmanship and quality.
 
It might not be anything else but the AB. I have an Iwata Custom Micron, an Iwata Eclipse, a Paasche VLN, and this Paasche Talon. My talon is by far the worst performing AB i have ever used. I push all kinds of paints and pigments and some very reduced ratios. HOK, Createx, Urethane, Water based, Acrylic, Alcohol based and my talon has always exhibited very poor spray control. I did not want to give up on it though and I ordered new nozzles, tips, and needles. Nothing has helped this AB perform well. I thought I would keep it around just for spraying large areas with the 0.66mm needle and fan cap. But no matter how much torque I put on the nozzle and tip it still keeps bubbling in the cup. I was once a Paasche supporter, however, my Iwatas are always on point. I keep the Talon around to remind me that not all AB's are equal. Look into an Iwata Eclipse. Similar price and, in my opinion, amazing craftsmanship and quality.

Now how about a true introduction of you own?
 
I don't follow your question Mr.Micron. What is a true introduction?

Are you new to forums?
And introduction is where you make your own post usually the first post you make on a forum to tell everyone about yourself, Like how long have you been airbrushing, things you like to paint. It also allows us a chance to get to know you .
You can find the introduction section herehttp://www.airbrushforum.org/introductions/
 
Thanks Mr.Micron. I will do that.

In keeping on subject with this thread I am very frustrated with my Talon and it exhibits the same problems initially introduced in this thread. I have gone through the entire gun (AB) to figure it out and my conclusion is that the nozzle and needle are made of an alloy that is not as rigid as they should be and are more prone to deformation than my other AB's nozzles and needles. The body and air passages are all clear of obstruction and the valve that limits airflow is a simple device that is working just fine according to it's design. One day I might figure this gun out but for now it's relegated to the back rack. Pretty yet useless. My intent is not to slam Paasche but to give my own insight on this particular model. I still love my VLN.
 
It shouldn't be the airbrush itself, just how you have it setup. I have 3 modified talons and it's my favorite of all the brands I've tried. It takes a little learning to adjust it just right. First thing is the trigger adjuster has to be adjusted nearly all the way tight, whereas most airbrushes you can back it off some to create a softer trigger feel, this body doesn't like that. Unlike most other airbrushes, the way these are designed, it steps down the air pressure about 5psi in the head. This is why the air cap is adjustable unlike with most airbrushes. You DON'T want to tighten it all the way down. The Oring is there for a reason. Depending on your air pressure, there is a sweet spot. Too tight and it will spit and sputter and stop spraying. Too loose and it won't spray at all and the air just escapes around the o ring. The sweet spot is typically around dead between tight and loose. You will have to adjust it till it sprays just right. Once you figure this out, the control is really amazing and YOU control the airbrush more than it controls or dictates what you can and can't do. I hated this style at first, but now it's second nature and My iwata's and richpens have taken a backseat atm. I can spray all the way down to 10psi which is actual output of 5psi, all the way up to 40psi and have full control. It's all in how you adjust the air cap.
 
When I got my .25 tip and air cap for my Talon, it wouldn't spray it was because air was seeping back into the cup by passing around the threads of the tip, after adding some plumber tape on the threads it worked like a charm :)
 
Back
Top