paint eraceablity

basepaint

Air-Valve Autobot!
when doing pictures that requier hi lights be erased what works best a paint that stays wet longer or drys faster?
 
What are you painting on? Com-art works great for me. Quite easy to erase.
 
One that's erasable :)..Not all paints erase well, especially on paper surfaces..Etac is one of the best and prob the main one I'll turn too but make sure if you do go etac that you get the right range..Other paints do erase of course and maybe just trying a few out..As to ya question it kind of depends how soon you'll want to erase, few paints stay wet that long unless put on real heavy anywayz..GL
 
I used golden on my m monroe picture and found it hard to erase the hi lights and found it easer to airbrush the hi lights in, but i also had some etac that i tryed with the golden and found it was also hard to erase; also when do i erase after the paint im working on?after it's is dry to the touch,and before i heat set the paint? Im working on masainite
 
Last edited:
Definitely before heat setting. Not sure about Golden or Com-art, but I know the Createx illustration and ETac EFX are erasable. The etac being the most friendly for this.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
Its best to erase as you go along in the layers of the painting, that way you can have a base of texture, then you can erase in the next few layers to build on those to create the depth in the texture. For example the porous texture of a skull(go figure id use that as an example lol). Also erasing earlier on will also help to define the sharpest highlights easier.

Different eraser softness and hardness also makes a difference. Using a softer eraser will slowly bring out the texture or highlights, as a harder eraser will be more blunt in the erasing. Knowing when to use them is key.

I use Etac Efx for the erasing, and being rewettable, i have a little trick for creating the sharpest and brightest highlights which i save for the end. All i do is have a damp paper towel and wet the end of my eraser, and this helps cut through to my base to bring the boldest highlights out, which the base is usually white.

Also its best to not erase when the paint is wet. Which if you are spraying light its pretty much dry anyway. This way you can have more control in what youre trying to erase. Its a skill in itself to use it correctly.
 
Last edited:
sounds like i need to start at the first light paint i put down and keep the hi lights clean of paint ? also do you use an electric eraser or pen type?or both
 
sounds like i need to start at the first light paint i put down and keep the hi lights clean of paint ? also do you use an electric eraser or pen type?or both
You dont need to necessarily keep the areas clean for the boldest highlights that would be in the last step of the painting. You can use an electric eraser to bring those out in the end. But i tend to stay away from the electric type for the way i paint. I like to use the wetting of my soft pink pencil style eraser to bring them up to where i want them. Just easier in my opinion to control.

Heres a link for an example of how i build up skull texture with erasers

http://www.airbrushforum.org/works-...-skull-again-plus-little-texture-tut-wip.html

I use a few different kinds of erasers. Heres a pic of the different ones that all serve a different purpose
00195_Capture.jpg
From left to right:
Fabercastell pencil style eraser (pink=soft) for light erasing
Retractable eraser- for blending (semi soft)
Fabercastell pencil style- for more aggressive erasing (white=hard)
Electric eraser- for highlights and really aggressive erasing
Wave eraser- dont use it much but its good for blending also and hair
 
Last edited:
It all depends on the surface. Too hard and the paint comes off completely when you erase. Too absorbent and paint pulls into the fibres and you can't erase clean.

If you want to erase, you need to erase with each layer are you build up. For skraping I've found that wet/soft paint works the best.
 
I use a few different kinds of erasers. Heres a pic of the different ones that all serve a different purpose
View attachment 28228
From left to right:
Fabercastell pencil style eraser (pink=soft) for light erasing
Retractable eraser- for blending (semi soft)
Fabercastell pencil style- for more aggressive erasing (white=hard)
Electric eraser- for highlights and really aggressive erasing
Wave eraser- dont use it much but its good for blending also and hair

ROOKIE :joyous:

erasers_all_sml.jpg
 
Last edited:
LOL Andre, with all those erasers your paints prob too scared to come outta the gun LOL...Heat setting can be important also in erasing, for example you only want to remove areas in one layer but leave the other underneath untouched..here you would heat set then erase the next layer prior to any more heat setting of the paint..Remeber just sitting the piece around for awhile can also set the paint much more than getting into it at the end of that session..The good thing about erasing is it can add a lot of extra effects thats hard to do with the airbrush but saying that..I only picked up an eraser about a year ago, for the first 10 or so years no eraser touched my work and the same effects you can create with one can be done in other ways..Sometimes erasing (Or scratching more so) can damage the work and make it look unrealistic, thats why many hide erasing into the layering sequence so dusting occurs later as believe it or not we don't really want pure white all the time..Also one other point, on a hard surface you can indeed erase, using a soft putty eraser and softly dabbing the surface removes very little paint, in most cases it only softens the paints or even helps blend it without it going down to the base color to quick which for other erasers on metal is def an issue..It all depends on the effect your chasing..Experiment, experiment, experiment..Good luck..
 
Reading through this thread makes me want to throw down another monochrome soon. My life has been all hard surfaces and motorcycles for a while now.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 
There is so much to learn in this craft - it can seem a little overwhelming to the newbie. Of course I think that is part of the excitement

Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk 2
 
There is so much to learn in this craft - it can seem a little overwhelming to the newbie. Of course I think that is part of the excitement

Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk 2

One of the first things I get asked is where do I get my erasers from. The person does not even have paint yet but they want to start erasing.
 
I'm used to painting fishing lures where if i mess it up i just paint over it! so to paint a picture again makes it hard on my brain as the last time was in high school and that was a VERY long time ago!!!!
 
Last edited:
LOL Andre, with all those erasers your paints prob too scared to come outta the gun LOL..


good one hehehe

i must say im kinda in the same boat as andre, electric erasers white tips and grey tips, faber castell perfection white tip (an absolute must) faber castell pink tip..... blue and red fabers, grey and white fabers, blue fabers..... kneadable erasers etc etc then you got all different blades for scratching and scraping..... fibre glass penicls etc.... texture isnt only what you put down...... its what you take off that can really make a difference
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Erasing is something I really need to get to grips with. Looks great , but the couple of times I've tried, I end up damaging the surface and it looks rubbish, even on shoellershammer, so I tend not to do it. Should make some time to practice I guess, but never get around to it Lol.
 
Back
Top