paper preparation and bleeding

P

pugster

Guest
Hi all , im new to airbrushing (and art in general - i only started attending an art class a few months ago , before that the last thing i tried to draw was the usual **** and balls on a text book :) )
i have a few questions regarding paper preparation and bleeding , if anyone could chip in with an answer i would be grateful.
at the moment for practice im using 240gsm paper and watered down acrylics , ive done some reading and tried preparing the paper by soaking it and taping it down (and tried stapled ) , when dry and i come to airbrush the paper is still buckling, is this something that cant be stopped? , also im having a problem with bleeding on the paper - i wait for each colour to dry but still get bleed issues when colours meet (dry+wet) - is there any way to stop this ? , i was thinking of using a pva glue+water wash on the paper to try and seal it before using -has anyone tried this?
 
Hi Pungster, welcome to the forum
Dont wet the paper, afaik there is no need.

please tell us what paint you are using? what airbrush are you using? what and how are you reducing your paint? what PSI is your compressor set to?
It sounds like you are also going very heavy with your paint and if your paper has already been wet, you will have issues.
If you could also do a bit more of an introduction, like where you are from, what you want to achieve from the art class, what they are trying to teach you WRT ABing.
anything else you can think of to tell us so that we can help you.
might also be a good idea to have a good look at theairbrushtutors youtube videos :)
hope this helps
 
Hi and thanks for the (very) fast reply :)
i am 45yrs old and from the UK , the art class i go to is a beginners class that does not specialise in airbrush - its mainly about learning form/perspective /colour mixing etc (very basic) and i was told to try as many different types of media as i could , i looked at a few airbrush videos -bought a compressor and gun and here i am (im working on my first picture but cant post it yet on here due to low postcount) , everything ive learnt to date is by reading and watching videos , my aim is simply to airbrush for pleasure and as a hobby.
the gun i am using is a badger 100LG , pressure is set to 18 psi tho i turn it down when trying to get finer detail.
im using crawford and black acrylic paints watered down with distilled water at the moment , i have some proper acrylic inks but am saving them for when i improve as they are alot more expensive ~(daller rowney inks)
when mixed i try and get a milk like consistency tho i will adjust the air pressure slightly as needed (i always try a few lines out on scrap paper before using).
 
I would say when first starting out, use paint made for airbrushing. Especially with no art background behind you. Water strips paint of it's adhesive properties. If you're using water thinned acrylic, you may as well be using water color.

Most good brands of acrylic paint will have a line of additives. You want to look for flow aid, airbrush medium, and/or reducer. These things are specifically made for thinning down paints without changing the properties as much. Use the same brand as your paint. Save the water for clean up until you have a better handle on your airbrush and a better understanding of paint in general.
 
many thanks for the advise , it sounds as tho my problem is not colour bleed but adhesion/ low pigment due to dilution of the acrylics - my first lesson learnt :)
 
this is my first attempt at airbrushing (using the method i said above) , its a pic i pulled off the net of a tattoo of heath leger as the joker.

first pass after initial sketch
2014-01-24183822_zpseccaccc1.jpg


this is where im at now with it , still some work to do...
2014-02-02202642_zpsef84c9b2.jpg
 
You do not need to prep paper at all. Maybe you can give it.a coat of gesso and then sand it but that is that.
 
I also learnt the hard way that you might as well get the good paints up front, it will save a good few hairs from being pulled out in frustration. the bottom line is that you should practice with what you are going to use, and the made for AB paint will work better. there are other factors involved too- such as the PSI and reduction ratios specific to your paper, paint and style and these are best worked out and learnt with the paint you are going to use in your future masterpieces :)
 
If you don't want bleeding go down to your local hardware store and pick your self up a piece of sheet metal. Rattle can it black and go to town. Looks like your trying to do a face (witch I wouldn't suggest) just because your new at the ab game and it can be very frustrating trying to get the desired results. Almost makes you stop before get any good. Maybe cartoon character or something 2 dimensional would be your best until you master your skills.


Anyways just rambling ................Good Luck......................Todd
 
thanks for the advise all , bare in mind until 2 months ago i had never even picked a pencil up :p , im one of these people that likes to learn by making mistakes so will attempt the hardest thing i think i can manage (which at the moment is most things :) ) and have a crack at it (i choose the above picture as it was a mix of different shades of 3 colours only with the main focus on shading rather than detail)

the point about using the good paint from the start is taken onboard and i'll start using the acrylic inks on the next piece i start , tho i'll admit im a bit confused about what paint are used in each job (i know i can use acrylic inks for paper and canvas but do people use them on metal aswell and lacquer over it or just use enamel paints ? )
i have a lot of reading to do but for the moment i'd like to concentrate on paper and canvas as im still learning the basics of colour mixing /perspective etc so theres no point confusing myself with painting onto metal.
 
Dots, lines, daggers…. Strokes you MUST practice…. until you have nightmares about them…. Trust me...
 
For someone who hasn't been into art long, that's pretty good in my book man! Naturally you can get more and more detailed, but that's a good go at it.
 
many thanks for the encouragement :) , to be honest i find dots no problem at all , lines im getting used to....dagger strokes on the other hand are proving 'testing' as the natural reaction is to pull away rather than in , then theres the problem with ending in a blowout , to me the dagger stroke is like learning to use the hands independently like a piano player except im fighting the natural reaction to pull away on the end of the stroke.
ive been reading the forums a lot and am already picking up some good tips (netting for scales etc)
.....practice, practice , practice :)
 
many thanks for the encouragement :) , to be honest i find dots no problem at all , lines im getting used to....dagger strokes on the other hand are proving 'testing' as the natural reaction is to pull away rather than in , then theres the problem with ending in a blowout , to me the dagger stroke is like learning to use the hands independently like a piano player except im fighting the natural reaction to pull away on the end of the stroke.
ive been reading the forums a lot and am already picking up some good tips (netting for scales etc)
.....practice, practice , practice :)

The whole point to doing dots and dagger strokes is to define muscle memory in your hand. Once you've been doing it for a while you don't have to think about it. I comes naturally. Not sure what you mean by confusing yourself by painting on metal. If you want a surface that wont bleed or soak in, a hard surface is the way to go. Ive been painting for years and id much rather paint on a hard surface.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
i was referring to the fact that i thought different paints were used for metals and at the moment i just have acrylics, to be honest its just easier for me to work with canvas or paper rather than have sheets of metal lying around (i live in a small place) , i dont think there will ever come a time i will need to paint on metal as this is just a hobby for me - tho i take on board what you said about it being the easiest non porous material to practice on.
 
If you don't plan to paint metal, you don't need to practice on it. Go to the local art supply store and spend some time with the paper. Look for paper made for wet media, ink or paint. Tho in the beginning I would stay away from water color paper, because of the texture. Go for a smooth paper rated for wet media.
 
For an early artwork your doing really well with your technique..On the paper side of things..I regulary use a medium-toothed watercolor paper, I actually like the texture of it, especially for a more arty airbrushing look but there is no need to completely wet the paper like you would in traditional watercolor..With water color we do that for a wet on wet application of the paint, watercolor is a different beast and to get smooth gradients or flat tones with it a wet on wet method works well. To avoid needing to do this with your airbrush, just buy thicker paper, I normally use a 300gm weight as a minimum, you can go thicker..bit more expensive but it removes any issue of the paper buckling..Also if you want a smoother surface, buy watercolor paper in a smooth hot-press..Will have a lot less texture to it thus reducing any paper bleed..As practice sheets I use a different type of surface which is still art quality (IE Acid free) and its much cheaper..Its almost like poster cardboard, has a gloss and a matt side and will take the heaviest applications of paint but it can produce more issues with spidering as any smoother surface will..GL :)

Oh and btw, stretching paper correctly is not an easy thing and does take a few attempts to get right..But thicker paper is easier LOL
 
Back
Top