paper questions

For practice (and it is cheap), but very similar to the good stuff, I used Bristol Board paper 250gsm , it actually says for airbrushing on the front of the pack. Once you get confident spend a little more on Schoellershammer G4 paper, I also use 3mm mdf coated with gesso, (the stuff people prepare canvas with), Claybord is another option.

There are loads of different substrates , and you will probably develop a preference eventually but Initially to start with and practice try the Bristol board , you will then at least be able to try erasing and some scratching .

My own preference is no moving towards gesso coated mdf or claybord, but mainly use Schoellershammer G4 .
 
Bean pretty much covered my favorites. For practicing I still use either inkjet printer paper or construction paper. You can't erase or scratch on them, but they still work great for drills and color blending/shifting.
 
What paper/substrate to use is pretty much a personal preference as they all are better suited for some techniques. I still haven't found anything that handles each technque equaly well.

For practice (dots,lines etc) just use the cheapest avaliable to you I'd say :).
Clayboard: very well suited for scratching techniques, less for erasing.
Schoellershammer 4g: very well suited for erasing techniques, less for scraching.
Canvas: I'll suited for scratching as well as erasing due to it's texture, it does have a nice texture though :p
Canvas with gesso: same as clayboard
Crescent airbrush board: recently tried this has the same erasability as Schoellershammer but is easier on the scratching.

As for my personal preference, I use Schoellershammer mostly as I tend to use erasing more than scratching. If I didn't have a big supply of it still around I'd probably switch to Crescent though.
 
I use wallpaper lining paper to practice dots etc on,plenty of paper on roll and only a couple of quid,you can even monitor you're progress if you roll it back up when you've finished practicing.
I use Bristol paper if I want to try a piece of art and trying to learn erasing etc.
I've also just switched to A3 sketch pads just to practice shapes and blends but you can't erase on that either.
 
I'm with Smiler65 on the Bristol board, but for practice I'll just use whatever cheap printer paper I can get my hands on.
Have played around a bit with cheap, pre-gessoed canvasses, but as Hassje has said - these do not lend themselves to scratching and detail is hard to achieve unless you go ahead and add another couple of layers to it to give a smooth surface.
I'm still looking for that elusive "perfect" medium - if it does actually exist?
 
I think we are all getting hung up on the painting flat pictures thing here.
Remember that there are those of us still painting on shaped metal like bikes and helmets and cars and things.
I'm new to the erasing and scratching method and I think it's a fantastic string to my bow but for those wanting to do automotive things Etc then the accent (IMHO) needs to be on the brush control rather than the manipulation after the paint has been sprayed.
I learned to paint on aluminium plate about 3mm thick and pre-painted on one side. I think it's the kind used for road signs.
The advantage I had was after I had finished my practice (with AA paint) I just sprayed it with a cleaner called "elbow grease" then wiped it down with panel wipe and I had a fresh surface to paint on.
 
I was watching a vid on YouTube the other day by Josh saying to learn on a glass picture frame as it aids in finger control to get the light touch you need, and as a bonus just use a blade to scrape it back clean.
 
I was watching a vid on YouTube the other day by Josh saying to learn on a glass picture frame as it aids in finger control to get the light touch you need, and as a bonus just use a blade to scrape it back clean.
A lot of guys learn to pin stripe in glass because it's easy to clean.
I tried painting with my AB on glass when I first started and it was a total mess. That was before I knew about air pressures and how to reduce.
The Forums were scarce back then and the people in them didn't share much, everything was held pretty close to the chest then.
I don't think a lot of people don't realise what a helpful forum this is! I think the experienced hands should be applauded for their willingness to give up information that has taken them years to learn!
 
I use wallpaper lining paper to practice s etc on,plenty of paper on roll and only a couple of quid,you can even monitor you're progress if you roll it back up when you've finished practicing.
I use Bristol paper if I want to try a piece of art and trying to learn erasing etc.
I've also just switched to A3 sketch pads just to practice shapes and blends but you can't erase on that either.
opps
 
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Thanks for all the ideas! I picked up some poster board to practice on, I have a painting I am working on that is on gessoed board but need to learn better brush control to pull it off, thanks again!
 
Im loving gesso board now, but early on.. No way. I used bristol paper in pads, allowed a little erasability. Im a gesso snob now, but need to try the 4g. Agree with odball about brush control. Manipulating can makebyou lazy.
 
Thanks for all the ideas! I picked up some poster board to practice on, I have a painting I am working on that is on gessoed board but need to learn better brush control to pull it off, thanks again!
The best posterboard I have found is hobby lobby, they also run it 4 for a dollar often. Actually much cheaper than the bristol pads I started on. Perhaps a touch smoother even. It even presents a decent finish so if you make a keeper you dont feel like "omg I cant believe I painted this great painting on the crappy paper how am I gonna do it again on something good" I just reached a point where I dont trash, or put up for future reference most of the paintings I do. So for me taking the effort to gesso some panels makes sense.

Speaking of gesso panel. Tnere are different grounds of gesso, some much harder than others. The first Gesso I bougnt was so hard it was similiar to painting on plastic or glass. I went over a piece im using right now with a golden gesso that has a little more absorbancy to it, ot to mention it was easier to get smooth. If your talking premade gesso panels, well im tooooo cheap for that Lol.
 
Ya the last panel I did I had to use an electric sander to get smooth, I think it was Liquitex, won't use that again!
 
Um....whatever I have laying around lol. For "messing around", I use printer paper, those are the days im bored, and just wanna practice skulls, portraits, whatever....havent done that in a LONG time...miss those got nothing to paint days.
 
A lot of guys learn to pin stripe in glass because it's easy to clean.
I tried painting with my AB on glass when I first started and it was a total mess. That was before I knew about air pressures and how to reduce.
The Forums were scarce back then and the people in them didn't share much, everything was held pretty close to the chest then.
I don't think a lot of people don't realise what a helpful forum this is! I think the experienced hands should be applauded for their willingness to give up information that has taken them years to learn!


I agree with Oddball about the willingness of the forum members to give information on how things are done and demonstrate it too in some cases. When the internet appeared a few years ago the forums were scarce and you would see the fantastic creations but would never be shown or told how it was done.
When I started ab'ing approx 30 yrs ago we didn't have INTERNET ( how did we ever survive? lol ). I learned from my good friend Alan. He was so skilled, in airbrush, firbreglass construction, automotive repair and painting. He showed me how to mask shapes and paint and polish after laquering. To paint helmets n stuff I used to get old car touch up spray cans and spray into the lid, thin the paint with thinners and stick it in the airbrush. I could only find some badger airbrush fabric paint in my local art shop which I did buy and used quite a lot. ( I still have them and the paint is still ok but i wouldn't risk on a paying job ) How different is is today although I enjoyed the old days just as much.

Lee
 
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