Portrait help??

R

Richard-uk

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Hi all, I'm doing a portrait of a friend in black and white.. My question is with the hair! Should I make up a grey colour or would it be best to use an over reduced black? Using com art trans black and a h&s evolution with a 0.2 needle.. So far I cut up a print out to help ghost in the main shapes!
 

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Both are viable options, keep in mind though that when you use grey you'll probably also have to use that in the rest of the work to prevent it from having a different feel/texture from other parts of the work.

I you are going for the transparant option add a light coat of paint (you don't want to get to the color on the reference imidiately), use erasors to add texture (hairs). Add another coat, you'll now might notice that in some spots you are at the color in the reference, don't hit these anymore with paint. Erase again, rinse repeat till done.
 
Both are viable options, keep in mind though that when you use grey you'll probably also have to use that in the rest of the work to prevent it from having a different feel/texture from other parts of the work.

I you are going for the transparant option add a light coat of paint (you don't want to get to the color on the reference imidiately), use erasors to add texture (hairs). Add another coat, you'll now might notice that in some spots you are at the color in the reference, don't hit these anymore with paint. Erase again, rinse repeat till done.
Will skip the grey for now!! Ordered an eraser the other day, should be here Monday! Will have a go at that, I have got a createx opaque black! Would this be a better paint option?
 
Depending on which line of createx that is a NO! or a no :p (createx classic is for t-shirts and for the others they are opaque).

For the layer thing to work you'll need a transparant. After adding a layer of paint you use erasors to add texture, when you go over this with a transparant again you will make the erased texture darker but they will remain visible.

The trick is to realise you are adding pigment. Each layer will add more pigment thus making it darker. The texture you erased has some pigment removed so they will remain lighter than the areas around it where that didn't happen creating the feeling of depth.

An opaque will just fill stuff up (it's an opaque :)) and undo all the erasing. You can get an opaque "semi transarant" by a lot of reducing but that will not change the properties of the paint. Meaning that with enough layers you will get 100% opacity (and opaque black has a nasty overspray I think).

For real dark area's you could resort to opaque black (as transparants take a lot of layers to reach 100% opacity), but when you are still larning to get a feel for the paint it might be smarter to wait with that till you know when and where you can do that.
 
Depending on which line of createx that is a NO! or a no :p (createx classic is for t-shirts and for the others they are opaque).

For the layer thing to work you'll need a transparant. After adding a layer of paint you use erasors to add texture, when you go over this with a transparant again you will make the erased texture darker but they will remain visible.

The trick is to realise you are adding pigment. Each layer will add more pigment thus making it darker. The texture you erased has some pigment removed so they will remain lighter than the areas around it where that didn't happen creating the feeling of depth.

An opaque will just fill stuff up (it's an opaque :)) and undo all the erasing. You can get an opaque "semi transarant" by a lot of reducing but that will not change the properties of the paint. Meaning that with enough layers you will get 100% opacity (and opaque black has a nasty overspray I think).

For real dark area's you could resort to opaque black (as transparants take a lot of layers to reach 100% opacity), but when you are still larning to get a feel for the paint it might be smarter to wait with that till you know when and where you can do that.
Ahhh got it :) thank you for so much for your help!
 
I am no expert, having only done two portraits. But, I took Mitch's advice on the hair. He uses com art translucent black and builds layers with erasing. Seemed to work well in my first b&w portraits. Scratching ( fiberglass pen) worked for me as I used canvas and couldn't erase on it. Marilyn had a white platinum blond hair and turned out good with trans black com art.
 
Theres dozens of good ways to attack it but use transparents if you like to use the canvas white a bit more in your initial build up or to shortcut a portrait or use an opaque if you like the idea of erasing or slow build, using semi-opaques is another option or like many use both systems of opaque then transparent. The easiest and safest method is opaque, I would suggest using a mid grey opaque and use it to lay in a pretty heavy base for the hair, avoiding some of the lighter areas of hair but allowing a mist of overspray to take them away from pure canvas white, I'd then layer a lifgter grey into those highlights blending them into the darker grey previous layer, then a reall dark grey to build the darker shade of hair..I then would pull out a black transparent at the end to blend it all together, but as suggested thats just one basic way, many ways to skin that cat..Best of luck
 
Theres dozens of good ways to attack it but use transparents if you like to use the canvas white a bit more in your initial build up or to shortcut a portrait or use an opaque if you like the idea of erasing or slow build, using semi-opaques is another option or like many use both systems of opaque then transparent. The easiest and safest method is opaque, I would suggest using a mid grey opaque and use it to lay in a pretty heavy base for the hair, avoiding some of the lighter areas of hair but allowing a mist of overspray to take them away from pure canvas white, I'd then layer a lifgter grey into those highlights blending them into the darker grey previous layer, then a reall dark grey to build the darker shade of hair..I then would pull out a black transparent at the end to blend it all together, but as suggested thats just one basic way, many ways to skin that cat..Best of luck
Hi, thank you, I'm going to try out this method and the transparent route to see what I find the easiest! I like the idea of the opaque as it will stop me going to dark to quickly..
 
I'm pretty new too but found that using a grey and going light gets a better result... Black is way dark pretty quick.
 
Gave the grey route a go! Pleased with how it turned out and still needs a little more work..
 

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That looks good. Scratch in a few textures and mist back over it to really give it some dimension. Nice work.
 
That looks good. Scratch in a few textures and mist back over it to really give it some dimension. Nice work.
Tested a few scratches but the paper is rubbish, will treat myself to something better to paint on! When you say mist over it do you mean mist a black over the whole page! Very light mist from a long distance?
 
After you scratch in the hair texture, you mist over the textures with trans black lightly. Only in spots where you can see darker shades/ patches. Adds a sort of 3d effect. Use really fine dagger strokes and build it up lightly. You'd be amazed at what it does to hair. Try it on a test piece until you get comfortable with it.
 
After you scratch in the hair texture, you mist over the textures with trans black lightly. Only in spots where you can see darker shades/ patches. Adds a sort of 3d effect. Use really fine dagger strokes and build it up lightly. You'd be amazed at what it does to hair. Try it on a test piece until you get comfortable with it.
Thanks, will give it a go! Oh love the portrait you did! Very nice work..
 
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