Pressures?

A

ac322j

Guest
Im a newbie still so im trying to figure out what works for me but sometimes i have troubles... Im using a badger 155 anthem syphon bottom feed ab with wicked paints reduced maybe 1:1 or further reduced for certain colors and a lot of reducing for white cuz it likes to clog my brush. Im using around 30 psi and only doing work on poster board for now(very slightly absorbant). I have troubles doing detailed lines semi dark and sharp. Its like its either got no paint coming out cuz ita clogged or the line gets too dark and slightly runny. Is my psi too high? Or can this ab not do as fine of lines as im trying to do? Or is the reducing wrong? Im new to this and if im gonna have to be using a lot of reducer i need to know so i can start advancing with detailed work. ANY help is appreciated. PLEASE VISIT MY PROFILE TO VIEW MY ARTWORK AND COMMENT/GIVE ADVICE. Or ideas lol Thank you all.
 
An airbrush can achieve as fine a line as the operator can perform... some do thinner lines that other yes but PRACTICE is the real key and will get you 80% (or maybe 90%) of the way there, then it's brush set up, etc. What needle size is it? Might be thinning, might be you need to strain the paint (common) might be that the paint is bad for tip dry,...
 
What kind of thinning should i be doing for paper detail work?? Does more reducing help with tip dry?
 
To achieve detail you require at least the following:
thin paint,
low pressures,
small nozzle,
speed.

The norm seems to be:
1:10 (paint:reducer)
5-10psi
.2 mm or less needle
As fast as possible for speed
 
To achieve detail you require at least the following:
thin paint,
low pressures,
small nozzle,
speed.

The norm seems to be:
1:10 (paint:reducer)
5-10psi
.2 mm or less needle
As fast as possible for speed
Thats helpful thanks. I knew i would need to use a lot more reducer.... Oh well
 
Pressure is just a tool you can use, there is no set number for it. You'll need to learn to adjust it to what you want to achieve at that time (in general lower pressure when close up, more pressure when working at a bit of a distance).

@JackEb posted the "general" priciple of doing detail.

You can achieve detail with larger nozzles but thats just down to practice (smaller make it easier).

Speed is alsosomething that makes it easier, for me it's not something I want to use when doing fine detail like eyelashes as it does take away from control. With enough reduction and the right pressure you can work realy thin while still working very slowly.

the amount of reduction you can use depends largely on the paint you use. I did a small article on it: http://www.airbrushforum.org/threads/transparants-opaques-reducing-and-viscosity.12903/

Except for the general "rules" Jack posted this is realy down to experimenting with your paint and airbrush and building up experience (unfortunately there are no easy tricks or answers to this, it largely is just down to practice)
 
For starters 30 PSI is prob to low..turn your pressure up a touch (it is a siphon) and run at about 35-40 PSI as standard (Then reduce the paint to suit and adjust pressure by 2-3 psi down if spidering to quick, keep going down on pressure until you find that skipping point.(may only be a dfference of a cple PSI.This is where the venturi is breaking down..Being a bigger needle gun and a 3-1 needle you'll find the anthem only is used in a very small range of pull for detail..You may want to consider a fine line conversion kit for it if you plan to do more canvas style detail work as that will increase the range of pull for finer detail and smaller work possibility..With an anthem speed is the key, there is no running at 10-15 PSI or using super reductions so a couple suggestions..

Learn to leapfrog properly, control can be maintained in speed with a bit extra practice and the need to do so..
Don't be afraid to paint a bit bigger with it to begin with..Reduce the size of your works as you get more comfortable, especially if using a siphon..
Try a conversion kit, especially for detail...there only like $14 each and that's the needle and nozzle.
 
Pressure is just a tool you can use, there is no set number for it. You'll need to learn to adjust it to what you want to achieve at that time (in general lower pressure when close up, more pressure when working at a bit of a distance).

@JackEb posted the "general" priciple of doing detail.

You can achieve detail with larger nozzles but thats just down to practice (smaller make it easier).

Speed is alsosomething that makes it easier, for me it's not something I want to use when doing fine detail like eyelashes as it does take away from control. With enough reduction and the right pressure you can work realy thin while still working very slowly.

the amount of reduction you can use depends largely on the paint you use. I did a small article on it: http://www.airbrushforum.org/threads/transparants-opaques-reducing-and-viscosity.12903/

Except for the general "rules" Jack posted this is realy down to experimenting with your paint and airbrush and building up experience (unfortunately there are no easy tricks or answers to this, it largely is just down to practice)
Interesting... I keep hearing about needle/nozzle differences but as you all can tell im still trying to soak in all the knowledge. But i actually cant compare what people are saying to what i have. I have a Badger 155 anthem, and badger sais it has a single needle nozzle assembly and ghey say that it "eliminating the need for fine, medium, or large needle/nozzle variations." So do you more experienced guys have any knowledge about this?
 
For starters 30 PSI is prob to low..turn your pressure up a touch (it is a siphon) and run at about 35-40 PSI as standard (Then reduce the paint to suit and adjust pressure by 2-3 psi down if spidering to quick, keep going down on pressure until you find that skipping point.(may only be a dfference of a cple PSI.This is where the venturi is breaking down..Being a bigger needle gun and a 3-1 needle you'll find the anthem only is used in a very small range of pull for detail..You may want to consider a fine line conversion kit for it if you plan to do more canvas style detail work as that will increase the range of pull for finer detail and smaller work possibility..With an anthem speed is the key, there is no running at 10-15 PSI or using super reductions so a couple suggestions..

Learn to leapfrog properly, control can be maintained in speed with a bit extra practice and the need to do so..
Don't be afraid to paint a bit bigger with it to begin with..Reduce the size of your works as you get more comfortable, especially if using a siphon..
Try a conversion kit, especially for detail...there only like $14 each and that's the needle and nozzle.

HEYY i didnt see this post before i replied to hassje dutchairbrush lol but its nice to hear something about what i have, not a lot of people seem to have this gun, i hear what your saying. The only problem seems to be that ive bewn trying to turn down the pressure and over reduce the paint for detail work. I do my work one section at a time so i dont lose my mental picture which means i need to do some light shading and some detail lines back and forth so i dont think im gonna want to switch needles and nozzles. So i guess thats why everyone has multiple guns. Thanks for the info though it all helps!!
 
Interesting... I keep hearing about needle/nozzle differences but as you all can tell im still trying to soak in all the knowledge. But i actually cant compare what people are saying to what i have. I have a Badger 155 anthem, and badger sais it has a single needle nozzle assembly and ghey say that it "eliminating the need for fine, medium, or large needle/nozzle variations." So do you more experienced guys have any knowledge about this?

I never handled that airbrush so I can't realy comment on that. It sounds to me though that it's a "general purpose" airbrush which can do everything reasonably well (it being badger I trust it does what they say it does).

This will suit your needs for a while I think but when you start going into realy fine detail you will start to notice a difference in ease whith which you can achieve it depending on the airbrush you use (as in airbrushes made to do detail in general make it easier to do detail)
 
I never handled that airbrush so I can't realy comment on that. It sounds to me though that it's a "general purpose" airbrush which can do everything reasonably well (it being badger I trust it does what they say it does).

This will suit your needs for a while I think but when you start going into realy fine detail you will start to notice a difference in ease whith which you can achieve it depending on the airbrush you use (as in airbrushes made to do detail in general make it easier to do detail)

Yeah it does pretty good. I can actually get some pretty fine lines, but accidentally get too close and its spider city since ive had to use at least 28+ psi. I have a gravity feed brush but its a Master brand and havent touched it since i got the badger lol
 
Interesting... I keep hearing about needle/nozzle differences but as you all can tell im still trying to soak in all the knowledge. But i actually cant compare what people are saying to what i have. I have a Badger 155 anthem, and badger sais it has a single needle nozzle assembly and ghey say that it "eliminating the need for fine, medium, or large needle/nozzle variations." So do you more experienced guys have any knowledge about this?
Not sure about the specifics but sounds like marketing double speak... :)
 
In what way @markjthomson it easily has the broadest range of any airbrush atm. The anthem is designed with a 3 in 1 needle, placed that besides a standard detail needle you'll see its tapers are much more dramatic. The same detail can be achieved as many detail guns...but the pull you have to find that detail stroke is very minimal and can be a bit of a beast to tame but when tamed its likely the most versatile brush on the market..All the fine line kit does is bring back a more traditional needle taper thus not so much increasing its ability to do a detail line or stroke but to make it a little easier on the user finding the fine detail sweet spot/pull of the brush..but @ac322j it does help to have a gravity also for that finer detail at low pressure compared to finer detail at high pressure (but I like overspray LOL) but when ya work it out its a fantastic airbrush...Oh ac, heres a vid about the fine line conversion kit for a squizz...

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In what way @markjthomson it easily has the broadest range of any airbrush atm. The anthem is designed with a 3 in 1 needle, placed that besides a standard detail needle you'll see its tapers are much more dramatic. The same detail can be achieved as many detail guns...but the pull you have to find that detail stroke is very minimal and can be a bit of a beast to tame but when tamed its likely the most versatile brush on the market..All the fine line kit does is bring back a more traditional needle taper thus not so much increasing its ability to do a detail line or stroke but to make it a little easier on the user finding the fine detail sweet spot/pull of the brush..but @ac322j it does help to have a gravity also for that finer detail at low pressure compared to finer detail at high pressure (but I like overspray LOL) but when ya work it out its a fantastic airbrush...Oh ac, heres a vid about the fine line conversion kit for a squizz...

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Just simply awesome. The ab is awesome, although im still a beginner and have only done about 8 pics but this ab does pull some amazing details while being able to flood the background with color. Maybe a little more taming is in order lol all in good time. Any suggestions on a fair priced detail gun?
 
Any suggestions on a fair priced detail gun?

Each to their own in that world LOL but cost wise, if looking for a cheaper alternative I'd likely go a Badger Patriot with the fine line conversion..Can snap up a deal on Patriots and find em around $80-100, 10-20 on top for the fine line kit and ya have a pretty darn good little gravity detail gun for 1/4 of the value of even badgers main detail gun the Krome..They can be found around the $3-400 mark (maybe cheaper these days been awhile since I've had a looksie)..Then of course you have the micron at sometimes double the price of a chrome (again maybe cheaper these days)..The only real advantage any detail gun has over the anthem and its ability to do the same kind of detail is that speed factor..you can take your time and have a touch more control with a gravity as haasje mentions, but a 0.2 mm line is still a 0.2 mm line no matter what gun you do it with..and do you really think many can tell if its a 0.1 mm line instead? LOL...but like any new gun you may find you pull better detail with the gun you know until you gain confidence with the new equipment as that will likely change your pressure and paint ratio needs so initially even when you buy perhaps a "better" detail gun you still have a learning curve...But one thing i will say is learn on the Anthem, when you do really work that gun out you will feel confident on nearly any other airbrush as the anthem definitely teaches you to respect the trigger...
 
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