Question about motorcycle helmet prep

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Hey folks. ... how you are all well. ...I recently purchased a cheap bike helmet as a promo practice piece. .... I'm not investing in new paints I'm just using what I have got laying around so probably wicked. ..
The helmet was black. ..I want it white so
I Sanded it with 800 dry and wet. . Primed with plastic primer and then a good layer of grey primer. .... I'm gonna use wicked white as a base through badger patriot.
Do I need to sand my primer before basing with wicked

Thanks in advance
 
I'm no expert but i would give it a go over with 800 again, nothing too coarse. just to get rid of an nibs and also to give it a key for the wicked white.
Theres probably someone on here who does this all the time.. Mick or Clive maybe.. of they see this.


lee
 
Squishy also does alot but she doesn't come on here till luke 4 a.m hehe
 
Auto air sealer white would be best over the primer then the white, but an extra coat of white will work also , incase you have to sand it smooth again before artwork.


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sand your primer smooth like Michele said. 800 grit will do just fine. When it comes to spraying your white base coat ... this is where a minigun comes into its own! To get total coverage with only an airbrush will take a lot of passes (and paint!) thats why i will even use a rattle can to spray my base blacks or whites and then start with the airbrush once the base is down. Its my personal preference as I'm
1) impatient
2) tight, when you consider the cost of wicked/illustration paints!
 
Squishy also does alot but she doesn't come on here till luke 4 a.m hehe

Lol, it's only 3.00 am, so there! :). Yup like everyone has said sand your primer (I love that silky feeling, but I digress), and it'll give you a key for your base coat. I've never done a base coat with the AB before, it might take a bit of work to get an even coverage. You could probably make life a bit easier by using a white primer (it would make your white brighter too), as it would be easier to cover. Tallas suggestion of using a rattle can might be a good option, it would be way easier to get good coverage. Do a light mist coat first, and then a heavier one (s). If you did get a little run or sag, let it dry completely and you should be able to sand it out no problem. If you sand through, as long as it's completely smooth you can just blow the white back in and it'll blend seamlessly. Go fezzles, go fezzles......
 
Yup, sand the primer. Better yet, mist it with a black guide coat and wet-sand the primer with 600-800g (assuming the primer can be wet-sanded). For best results, be sure to use a soft block with the sand paper, not just your hand.

After I guide coat and sand, I usually let the primer "breathe" overnight to let it out-gas as completely as possible. Rushing too fast can cause sand-scratch swelling when you apply the base or clear, which looks as ugly as it sounds.
 
Yup, sand the primer. Better yet, mist it with a black guide coat and wet-sand the primer with 600-800g (assuming the primer can be wet-sanded). For best results, be sure to use a soft block with the sand paper, not just your hand.

After I guide coat and sand, I usually let the primer "breathe" overnight to let it out-gas as completely as possible. Rushing too fast can cause sand-scratch swelling when you apply the base or clear, which looks as ugly as it sounds.

Good point HP about misting primer with another colour. As you sand it will quickly show any high spots where the surface isn't quite flat, really helpful if you've had to do any filling for example.
 
I like to use an automotive primer/filler. I use stuff from duplicolor. Its got more solids than normal primer. After that first coat, i sand it all the way down to the original color. The filler aspect of this primer will fill any small dings and scratches. You might have use a filler in the bigger chips but after a few coats of this stuff, its usually ready for a base coat. I always sand my primers to get it smooth, but then i still scuff it with a red scotch bright. Maybe its not necessary, but i hate taking chances.

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This might be a stupid question, but I see a lot of people mentioning it.

With a helmet (and most bikes) they will already be clear coated. I just tend to sand them degrease and start my painting. I don't see the use of all the hassle with primer (keep in mind I'm not talking about working on bare metal here). For me every layer I apply, especialy with custom paint is a layer that can mess stuff up and I don't see the use / added benefit of using a primer which will in turn alse make it nececary to add a layer of base coat.

I've been going over this in my mind but can't come up with a bike or helmet where I used primer, so why use them? I mean this as a serious question, so far I haven't had any problems but if I'm missing stuff I might also have to start using it.

edit
ps It might be worth mentioning I exclusively use erothanes when doing custom paint
 
I only use the primer on helmets when changing base color. Well...and when I think of it, primer when changin color period lol. Now, if im just airbrushing over a clear coated piece? I just set sand the sucker, AB it, cleqr it, wet sand, and buff..and done :)
 
Hopefully this is an appropriate place to ask... I recently tried painting my first helmet. I sanded the original graphics off, Since I've heard they'll show through after clear coating. I sanded with 600 grit, cleaned the surface, used a rattle can primer for several coats, then wet sanded the primer and cleaned the surface again. I Didn't do a full base coat of paint, and started straight into my design. I got the first layers down, then used 3m fine line tape and frisket stretch mask to start the next layers. When I pulled the tape and mask, paint came with it in a lot of places. I wet sanded those places, and started over, and got the same results. Any ideas on what the problem may be?
 
Hey j! As this is an old thread, starting up your own new one, may get you more response :)

Just couple of things that you can maybe include if you start another thread, or maybe make a bit clearer (sorry if I misunderstood anything, I only have one lonely brain cell :D) Did you sand the whole helmet or just where the graphics were? You mentioned you didn't do a full surface coverage of base paint, is that because you only sanded down areas rather than the whole thing? What type of paint are you using? Did you scuff the base coat before starting the design? Sounds like the paint isn't bonding, hasn't got enough to grip on to (or maybe too wet?). The stretch frisket (artool?) can be a bit too tacky IMO, (you could detack by sticking it on your shirt first), but the 3m shouldn't give any problems.
 
Hey j! As this is an old thread, starting up your own new one, may get you more response :)

Just couple of things that you can maybe include if you start another thread, or maybe make a bit clearer (sorry if I misunderstood anything, I only have one lonely brain cell :D) Did you sand the whole helmet or just where the graphics were? You mentioned you didn't do a full surface coverage of base paint, is that because you only sanded down areas rather than the whole thing? What type of paint are you using? Did you scuff the base coat before starting the design? Sounds like the paint isn't bonding, hasn't got enough to grip on to (or maybe too wet?). The stretch frisket (artool?) can be a bit too tacky IMO, (you could detack by sticking it on your shirt first), but the 3m shouldn't give any problems.

I'll start a new thread, but to answer your questions here, I sanded the entire helmet. It had factory graphics that have just a slight ridge on them, so I think they're a decal with a clear coat over the top? I sanded down to bare plastic, then used a coat of primer, and sanded the entire helmet again using 600, wet. As you can see in the pic, I sanded down to bare plastic after the first primer coat, and it seemed to fill in all the imperfections. I did a second coat of primer, and sanded that with 600, then 1000.
I didn't do an entire base coat, because I had some areas that I wanted white, while the rest would be dark, and I wanted to save some paint. I'm using Golden High Flow Acrylic for this attempt. I might switch to house of kolor for future attempts, but would like to be able to make the acrylics work so I don't have to worry as much about ventilation.
 

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If the helmet is plastic, then you need a plastic primer, as it chemically bonds to the plastic. But looking at the pics the paint hasn't come off all the way down to the white so, it looks like it's only the upper layers of paint that are the issue. Detacking the masking should help, but I am wondering how thickly you are applying the paint, it may not be drying underneath. It's hard to see in the pic, but if the masking is also leaving wrinkles in the paint then it is still soft. Reducing more and lighter layers in more passes should help with that, and you could even use a heat gun or hairdryer perhaps between layers. But I am not familiar with using golden, or how it is reduced (is it an additive or just water?) so if you start a new thread hopefully someone else can nail the issue :)
 
I think maybe I need to let the layers dry better, or put them on thinner then. I was using fairly thick layers and trying to go fast. That also brings up another issue I was having. In the areas that the tape didn't pull up the paint, a little ridge was left from paint build up. Ill start a new thread as soon as this reply posts.
 
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