Question for the Elite Professionals

musicmacd

The Createx Bandit
Is the Custom CM C plus the as a CM C with a Mac Valve in the air line??? My guess is no but I would like to know the real world differences between the 2 set ups, many thanks
 
I am not an Iwata user but it is the same in theory only..... having the MAC valve right on the brush at the mix gives you max control of flow. This is only my opinion and there are more experienced here that can either agree or disagree.
 
Is the Custom CM C plus the as a CM C with a Mac Valve in the air line??? My guess is no but I would like to know the real world differences between the 2 set ups, many thanks

The needle, nozzle and head assembly are the same. Performance is no different. CMC+ has a tapered cup to allow only a drop or two of paint at a time. The CMC has a larger cup and the base of it requires a much larger amount of paint. The V2 CMC+ also has a the newer style trigger.

EDIT: the CMC+ has a built in MAC valve where the CMC does not. I personally always use my external MAC for all my brushes. The one on my CMC+ never gets any use.

I wouldn't call myself an elite professional , but I figured I'd answer anyway. And I'm half drunk so I didn't answer your question right. I personally prefer the external MAC valve, but really, there is no difference performance wise.
 
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i have a cmc plus with a mac valve, the only time i think i my mac valve is when i am cleaning it.
 
The mac valve is a great idea but one inline with a quick disconnect works just as well in my opinion and is a cheaper option. I use a grex valve
 
As I understood your question the answer is yes, the mac valve is the "plus" bit. I looked into them when I was purchasing last year.
 
Sorry, i mean the difference between an ext and Int MAC Valve. It looks like the valve on the plus guns is further up the chain than the air line. Could just be looks like and not actually mechanically though - if that makes sense.
 
all the mac valve does is control air flow so I doubt it makes any particular difference.
 
Just the air but by definition will affect the paint in the same way any air regulator does. It's a convenient position is all.
 
I wasn't sure if it actaullay effected the paint/combination rather than just purely the air?

The purpose of the mac valve is to give you control over your air pressure without having to walk all the way to your regulator on the compressor, the closer it is to your brush the better, but the effect is no different if it's on the brush or under it, the only reason it's situated where it is on a plus model is because that's the only sensible place it could go, I have the HP-BH+ and have ruined many a painting by accidentally nudging the the valve open with my middle finger causing a sudden blast, I now have an external valve on my hose under the brush and what's cool about that is i can actually turn the valve so the the knob is pointing away from my body so that there is no chance of nudging it, you can also situate it anywhere at all you want on the hose, based on my experience (and how I hold my brush) I wouldn't pay an extra $60 to $80 for a built in mac when I can get a good quality external valve for $15, and this way you only need one whereas if you buy four brushes with one built in, you've wasted enough dollars to buy a fifth brush.

The valve has no effect on on atomisation or the paint it'self other than if you set the pressure too low you get a grainy effect or no paint at all, to be honest I only bought the plus model because it looked cool, and like Tucky, I set my pressure and leave it and only turn up the pressure for cleaning.
 
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I agree with Mad on the external mac : I use it all the time :) the reason : I use 3 different airbrushes and each brush needs a different pressure the Micron can function with real low like 15 psi pressure where as my Hp SB needs at least 25 PSI .
the second reason : when I paint a monochrome I use real transparent paint and if I use water to thin it down I need real low pressure but as I go along I tend to use less or no water at all an my pressure needs to go up again.
I like the way I can regulate my pressure with the mac valve to get my paint to flow just the way I want or need it without having to play with the regulator on the compressor
 
I agree with all the posts especially about making them fine adjustments, im still new at this but can see the importance of that fine tuning. The thing I dont understand is why would Iwata bother making another gun at a lot more expense than buying a $30 Mac Valve?? And adding additional cleaning to process!!! I may have to email them. Something still feels a miss....
 
I agree with all the posts especially about making them fine adjustments, im still new at this but can see the importance of that fine tuning. The thing I dont understand is why would Iwata bother making another gun at a lot more expense than buying a $30 Mac Valve?? And adding additional cleaning to process!!! I may have to email them. Something still feels a miss....

I only have a problem with the built in valve because of how I hold the brush, I'm usually steadying the brush with my middle finger very close to the valve, the valve itself is a very good idea and I'm sure that now everyone holds the brush like I do, but I think a little guard around it to stop accidental movement would be a good idea.

The only other drawback is as I said you can only use it on the brush it's attached to so it would be costly to have on more brushes if like Ronald you use a collection of brushes at once, I generally work with one brush at a time and switch between my HP-BH+ or my CM-B.

I did a quick check just see the difference in price and here in Holland the HP-BH+ costs +/-€225 whereas the HP-BH without valve costs +/-€147, that's quite a jump in the price for what is essentially a hole with screw in it:( although I have to confess that I actually got mine for €165 because it was the shop show model and I refused to pay the full price because it was not sealed in it's box and had been handled (but not used) by other people:)

I didn't check the micron though since I'm using the external mac for that one;)
 
Thats what im talking about MB
Massive difference in price!!!! I do use a MaC valve in line but just started wondering.......
 
Well I am no expert But when I first got the CM-C+ here are the reasons , One easier to clean , Could use less paint in cup and I liked the way the cup sat on the airbrush. At the time I could not see myself using the mac valve Being I am want to know what PSI I am using in case I need to do it again.
That was then Now I use the mac valve 40% of the time instead of changing line pressure . It is still easier to clean and uses less paint then the CM Being I bought one and then sold it cause While yes it paints the same it did not fit my wants in an airbrush.
 
just been on the Iwata site and they claim there is a difference between inline/compressor and the Internal Mac valve- so no one that owns one has seen a difference then? That what this thread is starting to feel like!
 
just been on the Iwata site and they claim there is a difference between inline/compressor and the Internal Mac valve- so no one that owns one has seen a difference then? That what this thread is starting to feel like!
Their marketing department has to sell you the justification of he overpriced built in MAC valve.
I personally think the external is better for a few reasons.

1: with a quick disconnect, it can be used with all of your brushes. Because of this, any brush I use is the same for adjusting air. The highest rated illustration brush, the CM-SB doesn't come with a MAC valve as an option, so external is the only way to go.

2: if a built in fails, it's probably going to be more expensive to fix. If for some reason it's in the closed position when it dies, your brush is out of commission. I have a spare external and could just swap it in a matter of about 30 seconds.

3: the built in limits air flow right where the air is about to hit the head assembly. An external one limits flow prior to the air valve. When using low psi and a soft air valve spring, all it takes is the weight of your finger to release the air valve using an external valve. A built in will still have the psi that your compressor regulator has set making the initial release at the air valve I bit more difficult to press. It's not a huge difference, but still a plus to an external valve.
 
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