Scratching Erasing and Paints

J

jgny1

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So I have been playing with the new paints that I have recently acquired. I have also been looking to figure out the scratching and erasing aspect of paints. So I just thought I would share what I have been testing out. Both of these tests were mixed 20 parts reducer/base to 1 part paint. In general I did not have any tip dry with either of the paints both flowed very nice through the Krome.

Createx Illustration Paint:
This was black reduced with the 5091 reducer 20 reducer to 1 paint. My first test was done on foam board, the paint scratched nicely was able to achieve some very fine lines. The erasing seemed to work fine as well but erasing as I see it would be for highlight areas or larges width lines the eraser (Faber Castell 7058B white) I used would not give a very fine line. This paint seemed to set up fairly quickly but I was still able to erase and scratch even after it set up. I also gave it a second coat and I was still able to scratch and erase down to the board for the white I wanted.

I then moved onto 300G Canson cold press watercolor paper. The paper was able to take the erasing well, but again this would be for larger highlight areas not fine lines. The scratching did not go so well, in one direction it seems to work OK but once you try to cross the same area it starts to pull at the paper and the effect is not all that pleasing. Even again after 2 coats the same result erasing still could remove all the paint to the white paper but scratching still not good.
PaperView attachment 21677FoamView attachment 21676FoamView attachment 21678



E-Tac FX Paint:
Again the black was reduced 20 to 1 FXHS 500 reducer base to 1 paint. Foam board test was basically the same result as the Createx Illustration, however I noticed that the paint did not set up quite as fast which made it easier to erase and I was able to achieve a finer line, but again not fine enough for strands of hair. Scratching was also slightly easier at the start since the paint seemed to stay wet longer.


On to the paper 300G Canson cold press watercolor paper. This did once again give me issues with the scratching, the same thing happened one way was OK but once you cross the scratches the paper started to pull. Erasing worked again as expected, I was able to erase all the paint down to the paper even after 2 coats of paint were put on.


300G Paper101_2429.jpgFoam Board101_2428.jpg



To sum it up, I do not know how you do the art you do on paper with the scratching technique to me I can't get it so if I want to do any fine art paintings I will have to use Foam Board or Illustration board to do any scratching technique. Erasing I can see possibly doing on paper where highlights are needed but no scratching for me on paper. I have yet to get an electric eraser that will come later. Hope this may help someone with any struggles they are having but again I am a newbie so I do not know all the tricks of the trade. I am just trying to figure out what works for me. As far as the paints used, I am leaning toward the E-Tac FX paints for now. Like I said both flowed very nice with no tip dry, but I liked the way the FX stayed wetter for a longer period of time.
 

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Interesting experiment. I use E'tac private stock, so I am no expert with the EFX, but I believe the FXHS 500 is the transparent base, not reducer...they call it "reduce air" but it really doesn't reduce anything... just dilutes the color... don't know if that would have made a difference in the drying time or not. Good info though. I still don't do enough scratching.... don't know why... it really is a good technique for hair and tiny highlights. Maybe I just need to do what you did and spray the paints I use on some different surfaces and see how they react to get comfortable with it all.
 
Good post.

As foreveryoung said, the "reduce-air" is actually the transparent base for the EFX line, not actually a reducer. Why they used that name, I have no idea. But it's a forgivable lapse. To reduce E'Tac paints, use water. Bottled water is recommended, but unless you have extremely hard water, tap water should work fine.

For the scratching issues, my first guess is that you're pressing too hard. You don't want to scratch into the board at all. Much like cutting frisket on the board, it takes a light touch. Also, if, like most people, you're using an X-acto #11 blade (or equivalent), I've noticed that they tend to have a "grain" to them. One direction always seems to work better, and going the other way seems to want to tear up the illustration board.

The EFX is designed to have a more "workable" base that responds easily to scratching, erasing, and rewetting. The downside to the easy of workability is that it tends to be a bit fragile until top coated. The CI paints are supposed to have a "delayed setting" that allows for fairly easy scratching and erasing (compared to Wicked) for a while after spraying, but it's supposed to then harden into a more Wicked like final film. I haven't sat down and tested there claim yet, though. One of these days...
 
Interesting experiment. I use E'tac private stock, so I am no expert with the EFX, but I believe the FXHS 500 is the transparent base, not reducer...they call it "reduce air" but it really doesn't reduce anything... just dilutes the color... don't know if that would have made a difference in the drying time or not. Good info though. I still don't do enough scratching.... don't know why... it really is a good technique for hair and tiny highlights. Maybe I just need to do what you did and spray the paints I use on some different surfaces and see how they react to get comfortable with it all.

If you use the reduce air 4:1 with the PS it will act more like the EFX, the reduce with water . I have done this , it was a recommendation from a long time ETac user, who has had many conversations with ETac.


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You can scratch and erase any paint provided it is on a good surface. You do not want the paint to be absorbed into the fibres like normal poster board or printer paper. On Shoellershammer 4G you get back to the white of the paper with very little trouble no damage to the surface. The Createx Illustration paint's editabilty changes with each minute that passes. After 30 minutes you can not do anything to it. Etac with medium can be wiped off even days after it has been applied. But it still comes down to the surface you are working on. Foam board is just a bit too shiny and you need very little air or thicker paint to stop spidering. But that is just my findings.
 
Great advice from all these gents. .... in addition the foam board I have found very difficult for erasing with. ... it's too Damn soft. ... you push the pigment in to the board rather than take it all off. .. you can erase some bit never get right back to White. ... very difficult. ... like Andre said. ... go go schoellershamer! Their g4 board is ace. .. for stateside try crescent
 
All that info is very helpful. The foam board I used was the best for both applications scratching, and erasing and I did not have any issue with spidering at that reduction. I actually liked the foam board but it is on the think side and is quite shinny. I have a crescent illustration board which I have not used yet saving that for when I get better. The foam board scratched pretty nicely and erased well with both paints. I noticed that the reduced base was "not reducer" it was the same viscosity as the paint when I used it from the bottle. I used an xacto knife, however I am not sure what number blade it had in it.
 
Unfortunately the Shollerschammer is not easy to come by in the US. I have found 1 place to order it. You have to order a pack of 20-25, and it's $5 or more each piece.

Good surfaces for scratching and erasing will not be as cheap as foam board.


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It sounds like it is the same as the crescent Hot or Cold press illustration boards. I know awhile back Josh recommended the Hot press Illustration board, but I could only find cold. My only issue with using this expensive stuff is I am not very good yet and I don't want to waste it, but then using just the paper makes it harder to do the things I am trying to accomplish. Catch 22 you know.
 
Unfortunately the Shollerschammer is not easy to come by in the US. I have found 1 place to order it. You have to order a pack of 20-25, and it's $5 or more each piece.

Good surfaces for scratching and erasing will not be as cheap as foam board.


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The only way I can get it is when I ask the importer to bring some in. They only order ones a year and it takes three months and I also have to order 25 at a time. I've used 2 sheets (I get 4 paintings on a sheet) from last years order and want to order the 1000gsm "dik" (meaning thick) version) now for delivery in the new year. It is worth the money and the wait.
 
I keep debating it myself. It would be different if there were other airbrushers I knew in my area that way we could pool together and order. I don't know how long it would take me to use 25 sheets. I paint on all kinds of stuff.
 
How much is 25 sheets to purchase? I also sent you a PM wayne wanted to make sure you got it.
 
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