should I worry about the room?

T

thematrixiam

Guest
I've noticed that in some of the videos from airbrushtutor he's got his own little space and it appears to have it's own 10" exhaust right beside his work area. Is any of this necessary?

If I simply wanted to start out airbrushing on an easel or table in my living room, could I?
 
That depends which type of work and which colors. Fine art and illustration where you mainly work with a few drops of paint is no problem. I don't got a special room myself so I already noticed, when covering bigger areas there's quite a bit of invisible stuff around which you have as color dust there after. :)

If I have to spray larger areas I go to my brothers house gsrage or cover up the furniture in my room.
This ofc counts for waterbased colors only and even then I started using a particle mask regulary. Without ventilation there is more stuff in the air as you might think.

Greetings, René


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Im lucky enough to have a sun room, so for big projects, I open the window and turn the fan on.
 
Working in a ventilated area is always the best option, if using urethanes, and solvents, it's a must, and you definately want extraction. You rally don't want that junk circulating around your home, getting into every ones lungs. If using waterbased, good ventilation and a mask is fine.
 
I've noticed that in some of the videos from airbrushtutor he's got his own little space and it appears to have it's own 10" exhaust right beside his work area. Is any of this necessary?

If I simply wanted to start out airbrushing on an easel or table in my living room, could I?
Great question. I too have wondered about this, as I have very limited space. The ventilation aspect was a question for me as I was hoping to not have to do it for the illustration work I'm doing because it gets very cold here, and I hate sucking the heat out of my house. But I would rather pay more for heat than risk the possible problems I could face down the line. Ventilation and a good mask are essential (IMO). What about building a small spray booth that would sit on the table, and vent it out a window? I know it may be a pain, but with some creative thinking, anything is possible?
 
A fan with a paper furnace filter in front of it will work. I have a 20 inch square fan with the filter mounted to it, that I use to control dust in my shop. just put it close to what your painting on.
 
It is always recommended to have some type of ventilation, and or at least a mask even if using water based paints. Even though water based paints don't have toxic fumes if you are spraying a large area, several good sized coats, or large project you will have a mist of paint in the air...it can not be totally eliminated that is why you should wear at least a dust mask. Here is a video from one of our members...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaaaZtQW7eM
 
A fan with a paper furnace filter in front of it will work. I have a 20 inch square fan with the filter mounted to it, that I use to control dust in my shop. just put it close to what your painting on.

I like that idea JHM. That's what I love about this forum. All kinds of ideas.
 
If I ever end up building my garage I might make a small art room with it's own supply and return with a filter in it. I'm a sheet metal apprentice, so I could probably set something up where the air is cycled out, filtered and then brought back in... At least with that way the air wouldn't get cold. Going straight outside would waste a lot of heat.
 
If I ever end up building my garage I might make a small art room with it's own supply and return with a filter in it. I'm a sheet metal apprentice, so I could probably set something up where the air is cycled out, filtered and then brought back in... At least with that way the air wouldn't get cold. Going straight outside would waste a lot of heat.

WTG matrix, was a fabricator for 24 yrs, HVAC metal fab commercial and residential.
 
I was talking to my boss about it and he seems to think that it would be impractical to build a room to try to filter the paint out of the air. Sucking it out and just exhausting it outside would be easier, but then there's the issue with heat loss. I haven't given up yet though.

Does anyone know what the 'AirBrush Tutor' guy uses? I see that he has some sort of exhaust. But is it filtered? or is it just dumped straight outside?
 
I was talking to my boss about it and he seems to think that it would be impractical to build a room to try to filter the paint out of the air. Sucking it out and just exhausting it outside would be easier, but then there's the issue with heat loss. I haven't given up yet though.

Does anyone know what the 'AirBrush Tutor' guy uses? I see that he has some sort of exhaust. But is it filtered? or is it just dumped straight outside?

Exhausting directly outside I wouldn't worry about filtering it .. the only time I would filter is if you are redirecting the air inside.
 
well if it's only going out side I wouldn't filter it. But the issue with that is heat loss.... If I was to cycle the air with a supply and return method I could then add in filtration... I've heard that the paint quickly becomes a dust. I wonder how quickly, and how that would actually play in venting.
 
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