Small portable compressor for Iwata HP-C PLus and BCR

V

Veronica

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Hello everyone - I'm new to the forum and first post :)

Hoping that someone will be able to advise me please. I have the Iwata HP-C Plus (0.3 gravity feed) and BCR (0.5 Siphon feed) brushes, plus getting the Paasche H set soon. I have an Iwata Studio Series - IS-875 Compressor.

I'm a hair and make-up artist, and do special effects/prosthetics. I would like to carry my brushes and a small compressor to jobs for ad-hoc airbrushing. Wondering which small portable compressor would be powerful enough to allow me to do veins or some make-up/blending etc. I'm trying to avoid carrying my Studio Series as that is another rolling bag/kit that I have to carry around. Thoughts please?
 
Hi Veronica, Iwata do a smaller compressor suitable for makeup. Check out the reviews of compressors on google. Hey to help us out can you please pop along to the intro page and say Hi, what part of the world you're in, experience, that sort of thing. Maybe post up a couple of photo's of your work. Here is the link. http://www.airbrushforum.org/introductions/
Also check out the nettiquette page - explains a bit more about who we are. http://www.airbrushforum.org/threads/introducing-netiquette.8799/

Cheers Mark
 
Thanks Mark. I was wondering if others would be recommended that were better and maybe cheaper (cheaper not necessarily a priority).

But thank you for responding and will go and do the introduction. :)
 
Any of the name brands should work as the pressure isn't all that high 35/40 psi max for make-up anyway higher and your risk pushing paintings into the skin
 
Thank you. I just wasn't sure if the smaller ones - like the hand held ones - were not powerful enough for the type of airbrushes that I had or for how I wanted to use them.

All good then - I have many options!
 
its probably not so much a question of what PSI (power) your brushes need, they'll cope with 10psi - 60psi with ease, its more what psi is required for the paint you are using to get the coverage you need, if the paint is thick it will need a higher pressure. if thinned appropriately then you can get by with lower pressure.

is there a specific brand of body paint that you use or do you have a couple of favourite brands ?
 
its probably not so much a question of what PSI (power) your brushes need, they'll cope with 10psi - 60psi with ease, its more what psi is required for the paint you are using to get the coverage you need, if the paint is thick it will need a higher pressure. if thinned appropriately then you can get by with lower pressure.

is there a specific brand of body paint that you use or do you have a couple of favourite brands ?

I will be using Tim Grattons water based liquid paints - thinned down with water, and using alcohol based paints like ProAiir and Endura - https://www.europeanbodyart.com/catalog/index.php/cPath/111_114_77_131/
 
On that link you posted, i would think the Element Compressor would suit -, "capable of 15psi continuous," I wouldn't think you'd want anything higher for skin. BUT, if you were planning on using it for an extended amount of time (a few hours) I'd be concerned about burning the motor out as it would be continuously running, I'd think that it was aimed more at doing kids facepainting, type of stuff. I'd probably still go with your studio compressor, even though its another thing to carry about, once your set up you wouldn't be moving it around to much.

I cant see any recommendations on that link as to what PSI should be used, but again, given its going on skin I wouldn't think it would be overly high, I mean your not trying to do needless tattoos, just lay some paint on a surface :)

sorry I cant be of more help
 
On that link you posted, i would think the Element Compressor would suit -, "capable of 15psi continuous," I wouldn't think you'd want anything higher for skin. BUT, if you were planning on using it for an extended amount of time (a few hours) I'd be concerned about burning the motor out as it would be continuously running, I'd think that it was aimed more at doing kids facepainting, type of stuff. I'd probably still go with your studio compressor, even though its another thing to carry about, once your set up you wouldn't be moving it around to much.

I cant see any recommendations on that link as to what PSI should be used, but again, given its going on skin I wouldn't think it would be overly high, I mean your not trying to do needless tattoos, just lay some paint on a surface :)

sorry I cant be of more help


No thank you, you have been a big help! :)

I agree, I doubt I would be going higher than 15 psi. I think I'm just going to wait a bit before buying, as I honestly don't know how long I would use it for (as in continuous). I do have my eyes on a $35 Iwata on eBay (used) instead of laying out cash on an expensive one. But I hate buying used as you never know what condition it will be... having said that, if you know of a reliable place to purchase used compressors, please let me know! Otherwise, I think I will just wait. :)
 
While this one is not cheap by any means of the word the old saying you get what you pay for comes to mind .
http://www.coastairbrush.com/proddetail.asp?prod=Super_Silent_20-A
It is like the ones use in the medical field and it is portable . I have the 50 version both here at home and for the machine I use at work ,
Able to drop down to 2 psi and up to 85. Both mine are over 10 years now.

Something to aspire to! I did a search and that is not available here in Australia but definitely something to consider down the road if I do need a lot of usage out of it. Thank you for highlighting it to me. :)
 
Just a heads up, any of the 'silent ' compressors ( not the studio type) are mega dollars IF you find them in Australia !
 
Something to aspire to! I did a search and that is not available here in Australia but definitely something to consider down the road if I do need a lot of usage out of it. Thank you for highlighting it to me. :)
There is Italian brand that is also silent .
 
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