spiderweb

HAREL8

Double Actioner
my question. i prepared a canvas with 3 coats of gesso and 2 coats of paint. when i try to paint fine lines i get spiderwebs. i am using createx opaque blue paint straight out of the bottle in a badger 105 with .3 needle. it sprays great at 1 or 2 inches from canvas but when i get close for fine lines it causes spiderwebs. i have tried various air pressures but nothing seems to work. any help would be appreciated.
 
its all down to practice and more practice, lots of variables that can lead to spidering but it can all be resolved with practice and experience.

Search on Youtube and there will be lots of info, heres a vid from @Nada that may help a bit :)

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yes i have tried several pressures from 15 lbs and up. i've watched numerous videos including the one recommended. i will keep working on it i just assumed i was doing something wrong or did not have the right equipment for the job.
 
3 main causes of spidering
Paint too thin
Pressure too high
Moving too slow.

The last one gets me every time, I can pull hair lines no problem on test paper but on the actual artwork I slow right down to the point I get spiders.
Sometimes a hairy brush is the answer :)
 
i forgot to mention i have no trouble with fine lines on any material but the canvas. i can do fine lines on sketch paper and even an erasable board. i know the canvas is not slicker or as hard as the board. so i feel like i should be able to do them on canvas unless it is the gesso or something i am doing to the canvas. the canvas is smooth.
 
i forgot to mention i have no trouble with fine lines on any material but the canvas. i can do fine lines on sketch paper and even an erasable board. i know the canvas is not slicker or as hard as the board. so i feel like i should be able to do them on canvas unless it is the gesso or something i am doing to the canvas. the canvas is smooth.
Maybe the canvas you are working on is too smooth. Sketch paper and erasable board are absorbent. Sounds like you have to lightly scuff the gesso with a scotchbrite pad or similar to give it a bit of ‘tooth’ so the paint has something to grab onto.
 
i will try that tomorrow. let you know if it works. i think that whiteboard is make from melamine(hard and slick).
 
Do You steady Your hand on the substrate when You spray? could be that the rougher canvas is slowing your movement down when using that to paint?

Record yourself on your phone using different materials and see if there is a difference!
 
i forgot to mention i have no trouble with fine lines on any material but the canvas. i can do fine lines on sketch paper and even an erasable board. i know the canvas is not slicker or as hard as the board. so i feel like i should be able to do them on canvas unless it is the gesso or something i am doing to the canvas. the canvas is smooth.
I agree with JackEb with the speed of movement. Were you getting the same results on the other material with the same prep and the same brush?

how accurate is your reg gauge? There is no hard rule to it must be over this pressure and under that to do a fine line. if you can get the brush to perform at higher or lower psi than you expect thats fine.

are you getting any other symptoms? Like a sudden paint initiation which has let a lot of paint flow rather than a fine gradual increase from nothing in paint quantity?
 
I thought I had control over my gear in the past 40 years until I decided I wanted to do illustration.

I was in for a rude awakening. I learned I was just adapting materials and gear to my poor technique. It's probably why so many people blame paint and brushes for their issues. People tend to hate Vallejo, because a lacquer is simpler to paint than water based.

When I tried Createx Illustration, thinned about 70% with distilled water did I realize it wasn't the brush, it's wasn't the regulator, it wasn't the paint, it was my trigger control.

After a lot of work, I could get to a point of getting nice dots and lines on glass, but it takes a lot of concentration.

I can easily do some nice tight lines freehand in circles as I whip the brush around, but try to get a slow, steady, straight line of even paint without barbells is an elusive skill. I'll get there eventually.

We watch videos where the dude says 'Just start a few inches from the surface, start moving your hand sideways as you get closer and taper off the paint flow' as they place a perfect dagger. If you try it, it's probably the height of human dexterity to pull off both fine finger tip motor skills while using your shoulder for gross movement on two axis. It doesn't happen overnight.

To loosely quote a lovely Russian lady with her airbrush school: 'Do these lines slowly until your trembling muscles are no longer weak.'
 
I thought I had control over my gear in the past 40 years until I decided I wanted to do illustration.

I was in for a rude awakening. I learned I was just adapting materials and gear to my poor technique. It's probably why so many people blame paint and brushes for their issues. People tend to hate Vallejo, because a lacquer is simpler to paint than water based.

When I tried Createx Illustration, thinned about 70% with distilled water did I realize it wasn't the brush, it's wasn't the regulator, it wasn't the paint, it was my trigger control.

After a lot of work, I could get to a point of getting nice dots and lines on glass, but it takes a lot of concentration.

I can easily do some nice tight lines freehand in circles as I whip the brush around, but try to get a slow, steady, straight line of even paint without barbells is an elusive skill. I'll get there eventually.

We watch videos where the dude says 'Just start a few inches from the surface, start moving your hand sideways as you get closer and taper off the paint flow' as they place a perfect dagger. If you try it, it's probably the height of human dexterity to pull off both fine finger tip motor skills while using your shoulder for gross movement on two axis. It doesn't happen overnight.

To loosely quote a lovely Russian lady with her airbrush school: 'Do these lines slowly until your trembling muscles are no longer weak.'
I bought new Createx Illustration a few months back, chalk and cheese to my old stuff. It’s so thin straight out of the bottle, almost too thin.
Hard surface, no reduction, around 10psi, Iwata micron.18 an spidering like I couldn’t believe !
 
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