Stripped handle repair?

2Diverse

Stick a fork in him, he's done.
I have a few brushes that have stripped threads on the handle. I've been trying to think of a way that I can at least repair them to the point of staying on. I originally chose to use teflon tape. It works but is obvious and it's hard to say how many times the handle can be removed before it needs redone.

Being another of my interests is sewing machines I thought of using thread. These were an easy color match, black and silver. I did the black one first. I used thread, white glue, water (to thin the glue) and a medium size paint brush to apply it with. I wound the thread around the handle in the direction it would go when tightened. I started on the closed end and wound it to the open end then back again where I applied more glue around it. I put about three winds total using glue each complete wind and test fit it. It seemed to be enough. I put one last coat of glue around it. I let it dry for about 20 minutes. I then installed it. It was snug. I removed it and reinstalled it. It was a bit easier. I'm going to see how this works. Time will tell once the handles are removed and reinstalled down the road. The silver one in the second pic has not been done but the black one has. Hopefully you can see what appears to be threads on both handles in pic 3. I took the pics with my phone and did the best I could to show them.

If you have an alternate suggestion I'm all ears.

handlefix1.jpg
handlefix2.jpg
handlefix3.jpg
 
Thread is an interesting idea. You may try using epoxy instead of white glue to saturate the thread. You can probably smear vaseline in the threads on the brush using a q-tip to keep the epoxy from bonding to the body. Better yet, a mold release (Mann 200) would work well. I've done similar without the thread using JB Weld or epoxy putty a time or two...
 
I have a few brushes that have stripped threads on the handle. I've been trying to think of a way that I can at least repair them to the point of staying on. I originally chose to use teflon tape. It works but is obvious and it's hard to say how many times the handle can be removed before it needs redone.

Being another of my interests is sewing machines I thought of using thread. These were an easy color match, black and silver. I did the black one first. I used thread, white glue, water (to thin the glue) and a medium size paint brush to apply it with. I wound the thread around the handle in the direction it would go when tightened. I started on the closed end and wound it to the open end then back again where I applied more glue around it. I put about three winds total using glue each complete wind and test fit it. It seemed to be enough. I put one last coat of glue around it. I let it dry for about 20 minutes. I then installed it. It was snug. I removed it and reinstalled it. It was a bit easier. I'm going to see how this works. Time will tell once the handles are removed and reinstalled down the road. The silver one in the second pic has not been done but the black one has. Hopefully you can see what appears to be threads on both handles in pic 3. I took the pics with my phone and did the best I could to show them.

If you have an alternate suggestion I'm all ears.

View attachment 83943
View attachment 83944
View attachment 83945
That's an interesting approach, wow, I've never tried to create a thread.
 
Yours is a great idea Dave. Thank you. I have a scrap body I can try it on. I have made my own resin model parts and I use Smooth-On. I don't know if I have any mold release left. Vaseline or similar i should be able to get easy. Need some epoxy too. I'll post when I try something.

One thought I had was to use super glue as the final coat or even after the initial wrap so I don't screw up the handle completely. I thought of thread as once wound and inserted it looks like threads.
 
I think I have read about people mixing vaseline with alcohol to make it brushable to use a mold release. Be easy enough to swab the inside of the brush body and let dry for a while before using for a "mold". I used to have some brush on release that I purchased from Micro-mark, but never tried the home brew.
 
I will be doing some experiments. I use a product similar to, but better than, WD40/PB Blaster. That may work as a mold release also.

I'm not used to being that exacting and I'm thinking I may make quite a mess with the potential of ruining something. You are used to doing precision work. I'm more "if a little is good than too much should be just enough" type of guy.

I'll see what I can do.
 
I’m really exited to see how this works out. I was thinking of using baking soda and superglue but that combination gets hard within seconds. You wouldn’t be fast enough to screw the handle into the body before it cures.
 
My first instinct would be to use JB Weld and a good mold release. Good luck with the experiments :)
 
I was thinking a 3D printed part would be a good fix. Printing a part with the fine threads would be an issue though but if the part was printed with a slight oversize where the threads are it might be possible to screw it into the airbrush body kinda like a threading die to create the threads. More than likely using some airbrush lube would work to assist in the treading process.
 
I was thinking a 3D printed part would be a good fix. Printing a part with the fine threads would be an issue though but if the part was printed with a slight oversize where the threads are it might be possible to screw it into the airbrush body kinda like a threading die to create the threads. More than likely using some airbrush lube would work to assist in the treading process.


I'm familiar with but not "up" on 3D printing. The handle would have to be hollow to allow the needle tube and needle to move through it freely. You could design your own handle that way.

What I am trying to do is restore old handles that are stripped but not to look obvious. The brushes range from the 30s/40s to the 70s. I bought this brush knowing the handle was stripped. Imo it is the prettiest handle I have. The white you see is teflon tape. I want to do better.
tcgreen2.jpg
 
I'm familiar with but not "up" on 3D printing. The handle would have to be hollow to allow the needle tube and needle to move through it freely. You could design your own handle that way.

What I am trying to do is restore old handles that are stripped but not to look obvious. The brushes range from the 30s/40s to the 70s. I bought this brush knowing the handle was stripped. Imo it is the prettiest handle I have. The white you see is teflon tape. I want to do better.
View attachment 83965
Was just a thought.
 
I've been thinking about this for a while. While thinking on a more permanent solution, how about using rubbery electrical tape instead of teflon tape? The electrical tape will stay in place and will compress to the threads of the body... Just thinking out loud...
 
Was just a thought.

Your idea is a good one. If you would buy a brush without a handle it may be a good solution. If the brush is single action and doesn't have a needle it wouldn't have to be hollow. The Binks Wren and Paasche H come to mind.

In my case I am trying to repair the originals.
 
Another thought I have is finding a piece of plastic tubing which is ever so slightly larger than the hole size. It may be possible to cut the threads into it using the body threads. It could then be cut to length and glued onto the original handle. If the original handle diameter was a bit too big filing the original threads off may help. It would come down to finding the right piece of plastic tube and hopefully in the right color.

I've done scale modelling.
 
Can anyone tell me what type of plastic these are made of?
My guess is acrylics, timeline is right, but anybody know for sure?
-Joe
 
Love those green handled TC's! I too have purchased a few just because of the handle ;).

If you have a body you wouldn't mind risking ruining, I would pack the back end with paper or tin foil, followed by some sulfur free clay (maybe sculpy?) leaving the threaded portion open, but not allowing anywhere for epoxy or resin to go beyond that. Take one of the stripped handles, and use an exacto blade, or maybe a saw blade to cut a few grooves running toward the handle, and against the threads (to create purchase). Mold release on inner threads in the body and on clay plugging the body, smear of epoxy, and "screw" the handle into the body. Let set, and unscrew... clean up any mess with a blade, or sand. You can put tape around the handle to make cleaning the area where threads meat the full diameter of the handle without damaging the surface... You'll get a good feel for how much epoxy (or JB weld) to add to keep mess to a minimum after the first one or two...
 
Another thought I have is finding a piece of plastic tubing which is ever so slightly larger than the hole size. It may be possible to cut the threads into it using the body threads. It could then be cut to length and glued onto the original handle. If the original handle diameter was a bit too big filing the original threads off may help. It would come down to finding the right piece of plastic tube and hopefully in the right color.

I've done scale modelling.
I was gonna mention the same thing as well as if you could figure out the thread size there maybe a Heli-Coil option available, but I believe that would be a long shot. Designing an airbrush handle using CAD is very simple to do for me. I did this in about 5 minutes that Im gonna try on my H&S Evolution CR+. As for the sleeve idea, I think ABS tubing would be a good material option as it plays well with adhesives and it is dyeable not to mention it is strong enough to make treads on. Polystyrene tubing may be another option.
 

Attachments

  • Untitled 1.png
    Untitled 1.png
    199.8 KB · Views: 7
Hello,

I'm out of town, but I thought of 2 ideas:
1-Buildup the area with Apoxie-Sculpt and tap it, assuming the threads are standard tapping threads which I need to verify
2-Resin cast the threads from a good handle and glue to the old handle. Will require some surgery and will no longer be 100% original. Bakelite can be a challenge as it is very brittle.
Will continue running mental experiments until I can get home and try some... and get slapped by reality. :)

Thanks,
Ismael
 
Back
Top