Tacky finish

M

mr bill

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I have applied Wicked color to a woodturning piece and after 24 hours it is tacky feeling....It was applied in an climate controlled environment... any thoughts....?
 
Was it sealed or have lacker or sometning else on the piece before appling the Wicked color? Is it the Wicked color that is tacky? Is it green wood or dryed wood? These are things that can effect the drying.
 
Maybe it's to moist in there because of the airconditioning or outside conditions. Don't you have a hairdryer or paintstripper, maybe it helps drying the paint.
 
what wood is it? pine?
did you shake the wicked? how old is it?
climate? humidity? temp?
details and hello mr bill, welcome top the forum, please tell us a little more about yourself. share some of your work :)
 
I have applied Wicked color to a woodturning piece and after 24 hours it is tacky feeling....It was applied in an climate controlled environment... any thoughts....?

If you didn't apply a suitable primer first, there is a very good chance that it won't dry completely, natural oils and minerals contained in any untreated wood will always affect drying times and in some cases stop drying all together.

I would suggest cleaning it if you can and first apply a wood primer, these primers are designed stop the effect that these natural oils can have on subsequent coats.

I'm assuming you didn't prime, mainly because of your current problem, but also the fact that you haven't mentioned primer, if it was a green wood as mentioned above elsewhere, this isn't supposed to be painted at all, except with micro porous paints (sometimes known as ranch paint) they are treated with a substance which is a pesticide and preservative, they are a sure killer for normal paints and certainly for acrylics.
 
Thanks for your comments...A little more about this project...The wood was turned at least a year ago...it was completely dry and it had a coat of Deft Lacquer that has been on the piece for months...The paint, was shaken well and was purchased about 6 weeks ago...How long it sat of the shelf, before I bought it, I don't know...

All paints that were used were applied right out of the bottle...no thinning...The Lacquered surface was sanded with 400 grit, and the surface was wiped clean of "finger oils" etc with Bestene solvent and allowed to dry, before applying the paint...

This is not the first turning that I have airbrushed color on...the other pieces had the slightly "tacky" feel also. I have not used other paints, other that WICKED....This may be just a characteristic of that paint...According to the paint spec sheet...you should not have to apply heat to felicitate drying...Here is Houston, TX the temp is plenty hot...I could just take and set in the sun....I appreciate you input and suggestions...
 
In that case Bill I suspect your problem is that since it was straight out of the bottle, it was simply too heavy a layer therefore it would be normal for it to take so long to to dry out, being that it's on lacquer wouldn't help that any, but no problem, the best solution in the future is more layers but with a little thinning.
 
Madbrush, It is thick, and you may be correct...now it is just a waiting game. Thanks for your input....
 
Another thing that could have slowed down the drying is your being in Houston which if memory serves me is quite humid and with the paint being a little thick you may get tacky for a few days.
 
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