Talon TS Trigger and Air Flow

B

Bree

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I recently bought a Talon TS. It is a nice siphon-feed airbrush in many ways but there is one thing that I don't like about it at all. I am thinking that maybe it simply needs adjustment but I don't know how to make the adjustment or tweak. Anyhoo here is my issue. When I press the trigger down it is all or nothing. I get 100% air flow or I get nothing. Pressure from the compressor makes no difference. I tried at 45 PSI, 35 PSI, 25 PSI, 20 PSI. Same result. I loosened the rocker for paint flow to see if that might have been causing a sticky trigger but that was not the case. I even did some fine sanding on the sides of the trigger to level the machining marks and eliminate the possibility of sticking there. This reminds me of my modified double action Colani which does not allow variable air flow from the trigger. Well the Colani is supposed to act that way. The Talon is advertised as a double action airbrush and my take on that is variable air flow and paint flow based on trigger motion. The more you press down, the more air flow. The more you pull back the more paint flow. I took the question to Paasche and got a nonsensical answer from the tech. So I am going to ask the real experts who use this equipment every day. Is there a way to adjust the Talon TS air valve to deliver VARIABLE air flow or is it a click on-click off deal. If it is the latter then the brush will be good for some things but not for fine detail work. BTW My Harder and Steenbeck Infinity CR Plus is superb in allowing the finest control over both paint and air. It is a shame really that a novice like me is using a piece of equipment that an expert could use to create masterful pieces of art. Pays to have some extra ca$h I suppose. I wonder if the spring inside the valve assembly might be tweakable??
 
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You need a MAC valve. To try and control air pressure with the trigger... would be insane. IMO.
It's too many things to try and control in one motion of your finger. Getting people to press down for air before they start to apply paint is hard enough.
 
But I don't want to adjust the pressure to the brush which the MAC valve would do. I want to adjust the amount of air sent to the nozzle as I paint. I want to send a small amount of air to the nozzle with a small amount of paint to make a very fine line when I bring the brush tip close to the work. But at full air flow it will spider. I can't cut the air flow with this brush. When I put a slight downward pressure on the trigger I get nothing... a little more pressure... it clicks in and bang zoom I am at full air flow and pressure. Does that make sense? I may not be explaining it well.
 
My understanding of the term double action is...1.down.... air on... 2. back...paint flow.
The more you pull back, the more paint.
cheers
 
But I don't want to adjust the pressure to the brush which the MAC valve would do. I want to adjust the amount of air sent to the nozzle as I paint. I want to send a small amount of air to the nozzle with a small amount of paint to make a very fine line when I bring the brush tip close to the work. But at full air flow it will spider. I can't cut the air flow with this brush. When I put a slight downward pressure on the trigger I get nothing... a little more pressure... it clicks in and bang zoom I am at full air flow and pressure. Does that make sense? I may not be explaining it well.
Like Twood said, trigger down for air back for paint. The air pressure is controlled at the compressor or by using a MAC valve.
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Double action means the air is separate from the paint, but you control the air flow at the regulator and at the trigger it's air on or air off, it is hard enough to get the paint control right if you have to worry about controlling the air pressure at the trigger. I think that some artist very familiar with their airbrush might be able to play with the airflow at the trigger, but they are few.

Check out the airbrush tutors video on airbrush control: How to Control an Airbrush

Hope it helps :)
 
As the guys have pointed out, the normal airbrush air valve is not designed to be variable. Some are a little more than others, but it's not a matter of quality. The Aztek airbrushes are a different design and have very linear control of air. But, they don't seem to be favored by many artists.

Don
 
So what I hear all of you saying is that when you do your air on - paint on - paint off - air off sequence at air on you are pressing the trigger down to the very bottom of its range and holding it there for the entire sequence until you release it to the top of its range at air off. If you want to paint a very fine eyelash, you go to your compressor reduce the pressure (or use a pressure control valve on or near the airbrush) to reduce the pressure and corresponding airflow and prevent spidering. Correct?
 
So what I hear all of you saying is that when you do your air on - paint on - paint off - air off sequence at air on you are pressing the trigger down to the very bottom of its range and holding it there for the entire sequence until you release it to the top of its range at air off. If you want to paint a very fine eyelash, you go to your compressor reduce the pressure (or use a pressure control valve on or near the airbrush) to reduce the pressure and corresponding airflow and prevent spidering. Correct?
The sequence is correct air on all the time, then back for paint then forward paint off then air off. The PSI, paint reduction and the amount you pull back on the trigger are what makes fine lines etc. Pulling back on the trigger gives more or less paint which you can control with the trigger. If you are doing detail work you would reduce your paint and lower the PSI. If you work on T-Shirts you don't reduce paint and use high PSI. Hope that helps.
 
Many, many years ago I also thought you had to control the air with the trigger. I could do it with my Badger but as soon as I started pulling back I would loose air. You either work at a constant pressure and adjust your paint mixture to do what you want or you use a mac valve.
 
Many, many years ago I also thought you had to control the air with the trigger. I could do it with my Badger but as soon as I started pulling back I would loose air. You either work at a constant pressure and adjust your paint mixture to do what you want or you use a mac valve.

My first airbrush was a Badger and then I recently got the Infinity which allows me to do variable air. So I thought that was normal. Looks like I was wrong and need to re-practice my technique which uses variable air and variable paint. I need to learn to do this the standard way. Thanks guys!
 
My first airbrush was a Badger and then I recently got the Infinity which allows me to do variable air. So I thought that was normal. Looks like I was wrong and need to re-practice my technique which uses variable air and variable paint. I need to learn to do this the standard way. Thanks guys!
I wouldn't call the air valve on the H&S brushes "variable", it is a bit more "Analog vs Digital" to use the analogy. I would never think of using the lighter touch on the trigger along with pulling back for paint, its way to difficult to control. Either the H&S fpc(fine pressure control) valve or an external MAC valve are used to control air flow. The trigger should always be pressed all the way down, at least by design anyway.
 
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