That tiny, tiny nozzle!

C

createinspain

Guest
I was lucky that when I got my Iwata ab, I also got a couple of cheapies free with the compressor. I say lucky, because those cheapies, being similar in parts, have given me the opportunity to strip down an ab without risking my already beloved Iwata!

At the front end, they are similar, all have a tiny, screw in nozzle. Now I am not particularly challenged in the dexterity field, and I have small hands. Even I find it hard to both hold and screw in a nozzle so small, so I hate to think how hard it is for some bigger guys! Am I missing a nifty gismo to make this easier or has it not yet occurred to the designers that one would be very useful? Or are they enjoying increased nozzle sales due to either damage or loss?

(Yes, I know about having a dedicated surface while taking stuff to pieces!) I use a tea tray now, with a piece of craft foam on it - the foam minimises risk of something bouncing off if dropped, while not contributing to picking up any debris.

Actually, just had a lightbulb moment - maybe a small round piece of craft foam (2 layers?) with a tiny hole in the middle would do the job.....:)
 
I was lucky that when I got my Iwata ab, I also got a couple of cheapies free with the compressor. I say lucky, because those cheapies, being similar in parts, have given me the opportunity to strip down an ab without risking my already beloved Iwata!

At the front end, they are similar, all have a tiny, screw in nozzle. Now I am not particularly challenged in the dexterity field, and I have small hands. Even I find it hard to both hold and screw in a nozzle so small, so I hate to think how hard it is for some bigger guys! Am I missing a nifty gismo to make this easier or has it not yet occurred to the designers that one would be very useful? Or are they enjoying increased nozzle sales due to either damage or loss?

(Yes, I know about having a dedicated surface while taking stuff to pieces!) I use a tea tray now, with a piece of craft foam on it - the foam minimises risk of something bouncing off if dropped, while not contributing to picking up any debris.

Actually, just had a lightbulb moment - maybe a small round piece of craft foam (2 layers?) with a tiny hole in the middle would do the job.....:)

The tiny nozzle can be a pain sometimes but as you go on you adapt to it, good idea to begin with your cheapies to work it all out and everything your doing so far seems to be standard and safe enough.

Your foam idea with a little how sounds good, however, one problem I can see with it is that it might restrict your view of the nozzle raising the risk that you could hit something with and damage it anyway, these nozzle are extremely fragile as are the needles and with your cheapies even more so, so the trick is to keep your nozzle in view at all time so you can see exactly what you are doing.

But is your lucky day since there is an invention for safe handling of your nozzle, although it wasn't invented by any of the airbrush makers and as far as I know not even sold or supplied by them, but they are freely available at all good chemist and beauty shops, I like to call them "plastic tweezers" lol, you will notice that your nozzles each have two flat sides which are designed to fit the little spanner that was supplied with your airbrushes, using the plastic tweezers you can make use of these flat sides to help you guide your nozzle safely into it's aperture.

And here is my tip of the day, if you place a tiny strip of electrical tape on the front inside prongs of your tweezers, this will make them effectively "anti slip" reducing the chance of your nozzle falling out of the tweezers.

These plastic tweezers are often referred to as "Tic removal tools" and very often come free with any half decent first aid kit, I should be surprised if there isn't a set in your car right now, and if there is, I'm 99.9% sure they will be green and stored right next to the scissors that couldn't cut butter, lol
 
Hmm, I may have to look for some of those! I have never seen plastic tweezers, only ever metal ones. Looked in all the car kits and no plastic ones there either...
 
All Iwata's (when bought new) should have a little implement to unscrew the nozlle (see pic). I wouldn't recommend using anything else (these are sold seperately so you should ba able to order one online). As far as I know one size fits all with these (but not sure for the 0,3+ Iwata's as I don't own any of those)

iwata.jpg
 
You do get the Sparmax tool that holds the nozzle in place while you screw it in. On the otherside of the tool is the wrench to remove the airvalve spring. I have one but the valve tool does not fit any of my Iwatas.

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It has the wrench? Getting them out isn't so hard, it's getting it back in! May have to look at the Sparmax tool....:)
 
That's why I love the HP-CS, it has the self centering nozzle
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has the tiny end piece, but treat it as one piece, tough as old boots too, only replaced one in getting on for 2 and half years, and that was down to my own stupidity, (though it is pretty pricey, but as you hardly ever need to get one....) just pop it in and out as needed. Good job too, I have small hands, but am as clumsy as a ham fisted ox, have stripped threads and even snapped one once in my old devilbiss.
 
That's one think I love about Badger airbrushes, their nozzles are like the HP-CS and are self seating, no threads!!! With that being said, a very easy way to fix your problem with the nozzle and handling it, next time you tear it apart, when you are putting it back together, put your needle in first before you put the nozzle on, make sure you needle is sticking out the nose of the brush farther than it should. Raise the airbrush so that the nozzle area (head) is in an upward position and place the nozzle on the end of the needle. Now carefully (from the back end of the brush, pull the needle back through the brush, not all the way, just far enough so that the lil' nozzles threads are close enough you can spin the nozzle on the needle and start the threads!! Hope that makes sense, is a pretty easy way to handle the nozzle and line it up perfectly each time. Hope that helps and enjoy your Iwata, theyre damn fine brushes as well!!!
 
Thanks for that tip, shall give it a go when I want to dismantle it!
 
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