The beginning of doing "lines"

E

Everett

Guest
Finally got everything set up to start today and figured I'd start at step one. Lines. So much to improve on but not the worst.
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Practice keeping the Air on, before you pull back for paint and turn off the paint before the air when you finish. That will help with the blobs at the start and finish of the lines. Great start
 
Practice keeping the Air on, before you pull back for paint and turn off the paint before the air when you finish. That will help with the blobs at the start and finish of the lines. Great start
Most of the blobs are from me making a starting and stopping point so I could figure paint on paint off. Like connect the dots! But yeah, its tricky lol thanks for the advice I still have a lot to work on!
 
We all started this trip exactly where you are now.
It really is a matter of teaching muscle control, and th
is means constant repetative practice.
Just like a pro golfer, a boxer or any other system that needs reflex like control.
Once learned, however, it becomes an almost automatic thing and you never really become aware of it again.
Much like pro figure skaters appear on the ice.
It's seemingly effortless, fluid and graceful [ none of which apply to me! lol] and they make it appear that way due to countless hours per week spent at the rink.
Hell, if I even attempted to walk on it, I'd be in traction for the next decade!
And besides, I hate being cold!:D
 
As the Nike ad says - - -Just do it!
Unfortunately, there is no magic formula, pill or potion that can instantly make you an airbrush master - because if there were - WE"D ALL HAVE BEEN TAKING THEM!lollol.
You've made a really good start, though.
And these are a helluva lot straighter than my first ones!lol
 
Most of the blobs are from me making a starting and stopping point so I could figure paint on paint off. Like connect the dots! But yeah, its tricky lol thanks for the advice I still have a lot to work on!
yep, very tricky but with practice you will nail it. try starting a tad before the start of the line and keep moving before shutting down the paint.
 
Great start nice to see you trying to walk before running:thumbsup: The more you put in the more you will get out and it does get easier....lollol
 
Thanks for all the tips and support. I can see how it can become frustrating when starting and how it takes plenty of practice! Nice to see ppl here are supportive and not condescending to anyones work no matter how good or ruff it looks.

Quick question what do u guys run your psi at on iwata hpc+ with wicked paint and whats the reduction of the paint? When I was practicing I reduced it to a milk consistency-ish but mixed up way to much paint lol. I'm use to hvlp guns and not these delicate little guns.
 
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There is no one answer to your question,the psi depends on your reduction and what your airbrushing ie.large area coverage or fine detail.Start with the reduction that can be 10-1(reducer-paint) or more,psi start at around 20-25 psi and for detail work reduce down to about 10psi some have gone down to 5psi. Its mostly trail and error for both as some colours require more reduction than others then there is tip dry with Blacks and Whites more reduction...hope this helps a bit:whistling::thumbsup:
 
There is no one answer to your question,the psi depends on your reduction and what your airbrushing ie.large area coverage or fine detail.Start with the reduction that can be 10-1(reducer-paint) or more,psi start at around 20-25 psi and for detail work reduce down to about 10psi some have gone down to 5psi. Its mostly trail and error for both as some colours require more reduction than others then there is tip dry with Blacks and Whites more reduction...hope this helps a bit:whistling:[emoji106]
Sure does thanks! With one of my other airbrushes I've only ever ran it at 13psi with automotive paint and in the manual it said not to go over 15psi I believe didn't know for sure how flexible or if there was a standard on the hpc+ or for illustrative work.
 
Sure does thanks! With one of my other airbrushes I've only ever ran it at 13psi with automotive paint and in the manual it said not to go over 15psi I believe didn't know for sure how flexible or if there was a standard on the hpc+ or for illustrative work.
No worries you can push it up to 40psi and above with the Iwata,if your doing textile work ie. T-shirts you need it up around 40psi. You will find the right psi with the reduction.I now have gone back to using Etac for illustration work as most will spray straight out of the bottle or with very little reduction:whistling:Other paints are available(legal disclaimerlollol)
 
Right on! Thanks, plan on doing mostly automotive detail work so I'm wanting to get use to how wicked colors work so I'll probably stick with that and house of color for now. But I'll look into etac because I do want to get into illustrative work as well. I like it all lol
 
I think you will like the wicked for automotive work its what i use for the trucks i do and i love it,what ever you use have fun any help you need just shout:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 
Wicked is great for automotive, the detail colours really pop when cleared, and as they are lightfast they look good a long time!

Keep up with the exercises, as you get more comfortable with them, and go faster, it will eliminate some of the wobbles, but looks great so far.
 
Round 2, little better. Finding right reduction and speeds. I still need to go faster. Try to do a little free hand at the end to keep it light and keep me interested. Little skull and cross bones lol.
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