The Final Splat

M

Mr. Magoo

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I've no idea how to title this or where to post, but this seems as good as any.

Question: when I release the trigger and a lovely splat of paint comes out, is there any alternative to dumping the paint and a complete tear down for cleaning? This is getting really old and tiresome.

Question #2: When I pull the needle and it is covered with paint nearly end-to-end, how to clean the canal at the aft end of the brush, behind the trigger. I try to blow it out with fresh water but keeps coming back.

FYI, I know I need better paint that ultimately will solve the problem, in the meantime . . . . .
 
GADA, THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN UNFAAMILIAR WITH A FORUM.
I've no idea how to title this or where to post, but this seems as good as any.

Question: when I release the trigger and a lovely splat of paint comes out, is there any alternative to dumping the paint and a complete tear down for cleaning? This is getting really old and tiresome.

Question #2: When I pull the needle and it is covered with paint nearly end-to-end, how to clean the canal at the aft end of the brush, behind the trigger. I try to blow it out with fresh water but keeps coming back, or rather won't clear completely.

FYI, I know I need better paint that ultimately will solve the problem, in the meantime . . . . .
 
What sort of brush are you using...? Is it the Badger Sotar? I can't comment on that particular brush however when my eclipse starts doing that I start with a good flush through with acetone (I'm using water based acrylics) and see what that does, and then maybe a strip down and clean. Advantage with the Iwata is the needle comes out the front, not back through the workings.
 
What sort of brush are you using...? Is it the Badger Sotar? I can't comment on that particular brush however when my eclipse starts doing that I start with a good flush through with acetone (I'm using water based acrylics) and see what that does, and then maybe a strip down and clean. Advantage with the Iwata is the needle comes out the front, not back through the workings.
Never thought about pushing the needle through the front!!
Sounds like a good soaking in restorer is on the cards
 
A blob or splat at the end of a stroke usually means a clog in the nozzle. Not enough to stop flow altogether, but enough so that the needle isn't seated properly, then when the paint is snapped off ,enough of the paint left in the nozzle is still able to get spat out of the tiny space that shouldn't be between the needle and nozzle.

Reducing more and also filtering the paint (with panty hose) will get rid of most of this. Paint behind the trigger could mean your needle bearing needs adjusting. Tightening a small amount, maybe a quarter turn so there is resistence to the needle, but not enough to affect the trigger control, should be enough. If it still leaks then it may need replacing. Not sure if that AB has teflon seals, but is it possible it could have been damaged with solvents, or it could just be worn, though I'm guessing the brush is fairly new.
 
Thanks Squishy, that makes sense to me. I use xylene which is less damaging to plastics yet still dissolves dried acrylics. Spats happen to me with both tools, but most often with the el cheapo as it is less precise.

The Sotar has a nozzle so small that I can't even pick it up with my fingers, have to use tweezers and I'm much afraid of loosing the damn thing. But when I get'er going, oh, boy does it ever scribe a fine line for about 30 seconds until it quits.


I'm going to quit asking questions until I get the new paints ordered (wicked) as cheap paint is likely the source of all my troubles.
 
The Sotar has a nozzle so small that I can't even pick it up with my fingers, have to use tweezers and I'm much afraid of loosing the damn thing. But when I get'er going, oh, boy does it ever scribe a fine line for about 30 seconds until it quits.

The small nozzles and design of the head in the Badger is what made me sell my Krome. It made maintenance too much of a pain in the ass for me. The same goes for the Iwata High Line and High Performance series with the small nozzles. Now almost all of my work is done with an Iwata Eclipse SBS and an H&S Evo AL.
 
Make sure you get the W500 reducer for the Wicked. It doesn't reduce well with water, and the reducer helps with flow as well as tip dry. Filter and reduce well and you should have no problems. I reduce between 3 and 5 drops to 1 paint in my hp-cs, and 10 to 1 in the micron. Quick flush through with reducer between colour changes and you should stay blockage free.
 
It sound as if you needle packing seal is to loose. which will allow paint to leak into an area that should not have paint.
You can get some 5619 Restorer made by Createx http://www.coastairbrush.com/proddetail.asp?prod=Restorer&cat=690
You only soak the nozzle and needle in this due to it will cause the seals to swell . But it will cut out the dried paint that is hiding inside.
Pipe cleaners and q-tips for cleaning the inner workings of the airbrush.
It also sounds like you need to learn you paint (if you are using Wicked per say ) using a .35 needle set up you want to start with 1 drop of paint to 3 drops of reducer (W100 or W500) the smaller the needle the more reduction. With a .18 or .15 set up I start at about 1 drop paint to 15 drops reducer.
Some colors need more reduction some need less.
 
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