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Tiger

Discussion in 'Works In Progress & Finished Artworks!' started by Ttxela, Nov 7, 2019.


  1. Ttxela

    Ttxela Needle-chuck Ninja

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    A mate of mine wants a picture of his dog, not having tried a furry animal before I thought I'd better have a practice first. Of course a Tiger was the choice. Had some problems with the blobs as the paint is shut off though, possibly it's a little cold in the garage at the moment :(

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  2. SiRoxx

    SiRoxx Party Boy UK Style Very Likeable!

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    When I get the chance I’ll have a look for the “blobs” and give an opinion.


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  3. Ttxela

    Ttxela Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Thanks, I was hoping I'd get back out there this week but no luck as yet, every evening there has been something else to be done. Looks like maybe Sunday is a possibility.
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  4. jord001

    jord001 Air-Valve Autobot!

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    Hey Ttxla, I watched the vid and I see your issues, SO the usual questions..

    What pressure were you at?
    How much was your paint thinned?
    Did you try any other paint to check if it was just the black you were using?

    Spiders usually mean too high pressure / too thin paint.
    The lack of spray at the start of the practice lines could indicate a blockage of some sort which brings us to the next bit underneath.
    The bits could indicate that there was debris in the nozzle or nozzle cap OR it could be the paint.
    If your cheap airbrush was clean then I would look at the paint and try a different colour on some paper to see it it performs the same.

    Just a few things to try and hopefully some info from you so we can work out what the issue is.

    lee
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  5. retiredgarnham

    retiredgarnham Double Actioner

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    Hi Ttxla
    I checked out the vid and for me it appears that the nozzle would be your biggest culprit. I owned a brush very similar to the one you are using when I first started out, and it almost convinced me that ABing wasn't for me.
    Being an engineer by trade, I couldn't resist getting to the bottom of the cause. First thing I did was to do exactly what you have done. No difference to the brush. Then I investigated the nozzle using a magnifying glass. Bingo!! I stripped a small length of multi stranded wire and using one or two of the strands, began to scrape out the inside of the nozzle until I couldn't remove any more of the minute specks of paint. Eventually the strand/s went through the end of the nozzle cleanly. To test I used a spray bottle of window cleaner and held the nozzle hard onto the bottle and watched as the cleaner came through the nozzle. I rebuilt the brush, loaded it with window cleaner and tested it on paper. Next using a well known paint I tested the brush. Good as new. Incidently I always adopt this procedure if I am in doubt. But instead of copper stranded wire I use a small length of stranded stainless steel wire, which can be purchased from any good model shop.
    I hope this might be useful to you
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  6. SiRoxx

    SiRoxx Party Boy UK Style Very Likeable!

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    From the looks of the cleaner you had it soaking in there was some cleaning to do, so that’s great that you’ve found that. But being that both brushes had a similar issue I’m not convinced there isn’t something else going on. The test lines you showed look a lot like the pressure was too high or the trigger was too far back which was causing the spidering. Having an unpredictable spray pattern often leads to spidering because nothing is coming out so we pull back a little further and bam, out comes the paint.
    Cleaning was definitely the right thing to do and may well solve the problem, but it could be an issue with the paint reduction too. So as Lee said; what paint, pressure and reduction ratio?


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  7. Ttxela

    Ttxela Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Thanks everyone, I had another go this weekend and although I haven't edited the video yet I can answer some of the questions.

    I tried almost every pressure and reduction from paint as it comes out of the container, to about 50:50, the thinner paint was, if anything, better but still not right and inconsistent in coming on, then a blob as I went off. I also played quite a lot with air pressure, everything from 15psi to 40psi.

    I think the best result I got were at around 25psi with around 2 drops of reducer to 8 of paint.

    I didn't actually try any other colours - that could be interesting but black has seemed easiest to use in the past....

    With regard to cleanliness the parts had about a week to soak. I didn't clean inside the nozzle as I didn't have anything fine enough and was a bit wary of causing damage.

    Ultimately I couldn't get decent enough results to continue. I put it down in the end to poor conditions. I'm working in an open fronted lock up with an air temperature of around 7degC. I suspect the humidity was pretty high as well. I know this is not ideal but I was confident as I'd worked at similar temperatures at the start of the year - however I suppose I was doing simpler stuff with stencils and the like back then so poor consistency wouldn't have been such an issue.

    I've persuaded Mrs T to let me try painting in the house - but I need to make up some sort of booth first.
  8. SiRoxx

    SiRoxx Party Boy UK Style Very Likeable!

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    What paint is it that you’re using? When I began I had a set of Wicked, that needed around 10 drops of reducer for every 1 drop of paint for me to get it to work for me. Even using Urethanes I find 2 parts reducer for 1 drop of paint is around the sweet spot. With me and my Eclipse 18psi and this reduction seems to give eve the most predictable results.


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  9. Ttxela

    Ttxela Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Wow, that sounds pretty thin, I'm using Createx Wicked and 4020 reducer. I'm painting on steel though rather than paper if that makes a difference?
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  10. twood

    twood Detail Decepticon! Very Likeable!

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    That does sound like not enough reducer...and the paint thickens like crazy when trying to paint at 7 degrees c...That's 44 degrees f...
    I notice a huge difference when it gets to 16 deg c here in my shed in the winter...it is -10 c outside...
    And my starting point is around 2 parts reducer to 1 paint...
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  11. SiRoxx

    SiRoxx Party Boy UK Style Very Likeable!

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    I think it’s a simple case of your paint is too thick and when that’s coupled with the lower temperature, I believe we’ve found your trouble. Have a play with at least 3 drops of reducer to 1 drop of paint around 20psi and see how you go. I wouldn’t be surprised if you need to add a little more. This will need a more delicate pull on the trigger due to the lower viscosity, but it should at least be predictable and allow for much lighter layers of paint.


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  12. Ttxela

    Ttxela Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Ok, I will definitely try that, I've certainly never tried adding more reducer than paint, the thinnest I've gone is about 50:50. So perhaps I will not need to move indoors after all?

    How cold do people usually go before painting becomes too difficult? Obviously anything below freezing is probably a non-starter with water based paints I guess :laugh:
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  13. SiRoxx

    SiRoxx Party Boy UK Style Very Likeable!

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    It could be a combination of both. But the biggest break through I’ve had in airbrushing was learning to reduce until it flows correctly rather than reducing to a set amount.


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