Tips or Tricks for airbrushing sparks?

Z

zimmer

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I am working on a project painting a saw blade cutting with sparks. Any tips or tricks for painting sparks? If not I am off to paint them one at a time.
 
This is the way I'd go about it I think (though I'd first make a small test before puting it into practice :p)

Background:

This trick depends a bit on the size you are working on (if its too big you'll need a bigger nozzle size to get bigger dots)

If you reduce your airpressure to 0 and turn it up slightly you'll notice that there is not enough pressure to atomize the paint with some drops as a result. If you have the presure low enough you will have to move the trigger back and foth to build up enough presure to have the drops come out.

When you pull your gun in the direction the sparks need to go the drops will also pull in that direction. This will generate a lot of little sparks. You could emphasize a couple by slyghtly painting over them.

Foreground:

Cut out a couple dozen or so sparks out of mylar (or whatever you have lying around) and use that as a mask. Paint that a couple of times making sure you slightly vary the direction each time and don't use the whole stencil each time (to keep it varied). Go over each spark created this way with the airbrush to give it a bit of a glow.

Add some freehand stuff where deemed needed for some variation


Edit: And have a look on the web for some pictures of sparks, having some references is always a good idea for those little details you won't come up with yourself.
 
I'd first ask what kind of sparks. Welding, large sparks, small, etc
 
Stipple background to fill it in. Good idea I didn't think of that
 
Circular saw blade on metal. Painted size is close to original size of blade
 
I tried the stipple technique and it looked to much like the saw was cutting up a body part and blood was flying. LOL, not the look I wanted. I redid it by hand. Here are pictures before clear coat.
 

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I tried the stipple technique and it looked to much like the saw was cutting up a body part and blood was flying. LOL, not the look I wanted. I redid it by hand. Here are pictures before clear coat.
LMAO!! Turned out cool though! !
 
Looks awesome! Thanks for posting pics they are what inspire me to keep practicing.
 
Client doesn't like the whole design. . Funny because that is the exact design he asked for. Oh well he is paying me to change it.
 
I like the bloodied version lol. I think he didn't like it because it doesn't read as a circular saw blade and there is no "movement". If you didn't tell us ahead of time it was a sparking saw blade, I'd find it hard to figure that out with how it's cut in half. Some circular "action" lines or something in the blade would add to the effect and make it look less like an upside down shark fin. Also when you cut material with a saw blade, to sparks don't come from the angle you have them so it looks too random. They would start from the bottom (the part of the blade that makes contact with piece cutting) then get thrown forwards or backwards depending on rotation the blade is set on and the angle. Not a bad attempt bit always research how an object you are painting works if you don't know. This is what ads to realism and beleivability

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Client doesn't like the whole design. . Funny because that is the exact design he asked for. Oh well he is paying me to change it.
Had that happen before, you follow someone's ideas to the letter (even though in some cases I tell them it won't look right, but do it when they insist), then when they see it, it isn't what they wanted, They haven't described to you the picture they were seeing in their head, but still expect it to turn out how they imagined LOL. Now I only go by pic refs, or just tell them to let me design something, and do a sketch for them to approve, that way I can stay smiley and not want to throw things ha ha!
 
Also the teeth on the blade go in the direction of the cut, so your blade is going in the right direction I'm assuming by the name being in the front so the sparks are close to being right but needed to start lower at the bottom and curve away from the blade.

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uploadfromtaptalk1402571801547.jpg Not a saw blade but same principle. It heats up at point of contact then travels with rotation. Also a saw blade for ferrous metals doesn't have those kinds of tips, the blade you have is for wood.

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uploadfromtaptalk1402571899332.jpg this is what I use for cutting steel. They all have blades angled like this.

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The picture is of the bottom of the blade you are not looking top down. . Your looking bottom up. . It is coming through the helmet, not into. There are circular highlights and regular to show it is curved and moving. They just don't show up well in the photo. .It wasn't the saw blade he didn't like. It was his idea for the brim with the tools and his idea to put his logo on the back instead of the front.
 
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