Trigger limiting device

R

Ranger370

Guest
I am still looking at the Micron CM-C because it is so much like my Eclipse....only better:****sure:.. I noticed in my research it had a handle pre-set to limit the trigger movement. I can see where that would be a big help to someone like myself in doing detail work. My hand tremors are very likely to kick in when I'm doing detail and cause me to twitch and pull the trigger all the way to the back threreby causing a blob and a cussing fit,...LOL Have any of you guys ever used one of these and is it any help in creating fine lines and small detail without the type of problem I described? I know my situation is probably unique but I'm not giving up:disillusionment:
 
W

wmlepage

Guest
I have used the one on my HP-CH, as a trial. Definitely makes doing many repetitive fine lines easier to replicate. But I never use it. In your situation it could save your butt.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 
A

ad fez

Guest
hey mate i agree with wmlepage, it good definitely be a good thing for you, however, when doing fine lines, often you only pull back on the trigger the slightest bit and move quickly dependant on what you are trying to achieve of course, but sometimes the brush just needs a little extra beans to get the paint actually flowing..... you could certainly wind it back just a little further, so you can still crank it back a bit when you want but without the risk of totally emptying a cup all over your work..... I have a trigger limiter on my badger velocity, it does work well but i tend not to use it as when you get a bit of tip dry or a clog its just easier to crank it back and blow the crud out..... as i say though could be ideal for you..... have a look at the krome maybe, its like a quarter of the price but not a quarter of the brush and has the trigger mech you are on about
 
R

Ranger370

Guest
I saw where the Iwata Eclipse has that feature as an option but don't have a cluse as to where to buy it. I think I'll look at the Krome also. I have never owned a Badger but I hear they are good. Yes, the old "blow out" is not something I had thought of but what I had in mind was using my Eclipse for most of the work and switching to the other brush just for fine lines and details. Thanks guys, I appreciate all your advice.
 
M

Melbee

Guest
Hi Ranger,
You could also look at the Harder & Steenbeck Infinity that has a Quick Fix limiter which only they make. It allows you to set a limit on you trigger but also you can click this off and it gives you full travel again. If you want to go back to the trigger limit you previously set then you just push the button in and it will go back to the same setting. This could be great for you and gives you complete freedom to set a limit on the trigger, release it to blow out a clog or clean the cup out and then click back to your limiter again.

Here is a video that shows you the Infinity 2 in 1 (0.15 and 0.4mm) and also how the Quick Fix limiter works, you can also buy the Infinity Solo 0.15mm.
Infinity airbrush by Harder & Steenbeck - YouTube

I've never used this airbrush but I heard very good reviews about it as a detail airbrush and it is a more reasonable price, for parts too. I'm sure someone on the forum can tell you more about it.
cheers Mel
 
M

Melbee

Guest
Hi Ranger,
Is this the handle you saw for the Eclipse pre-set? I found this on Miscellaneous Iwata products

Triple Action Handle K-150

incl Tax €22.50 ex Tax €18.60

The NEW handle Triple Action Handle gives you instant access to the needle for fast full flushing and quick and easy replacement or cleaning. A unique pre-set handle feature actually holds the needle back from the nozzle instead of limiting trigger movement, allowing for more consistent spray time after time. An added bonus to the Triple Action Handle is it has a threaded needle knob on the rear of the handle to store your needle cap, too! The triple action handle gives you one effective solution to your airbrush cleaning process.

The Triple-Action Handle Fits These Iwata Airbrushes:

• Hi Line Series
• HP-C and HP-BC
• HP-C Plus and HP-BC Plus
• Eclipse CS, BCS, and BS
• Revolution BCR and CR
• Kustom CH and CS

It doesn't limit the trigger but holds the needle back from the nozzle which I thought was a bit weird and this wouldn't help if you get a twitch while spraying.

cheers Mel
 
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jagardn

Airbrush Acquisition Disorder Patient
Hi Ranger,
You could also look at the Harder & Steenbeck Infinity that has a Quick Fix limiter which only they make. It allows you to set a limit on you trigger but also you can click this off and it gives you full travel again. If you want to go back to the trigger limit you previously set then you just push the button in and it will go back to the same setting. This could be great for you and gives you complete freedom to set a limit on the trigger, release it to blow out a clog or clean the cup out and then click back to your limiter again.

Here is a video that shows you the Infinity 2 in 1 (0.15 and 0.4mm) and also how the Quick Fix limiter works, you can also buy the Infinity Solo 0.15mm.
Infinity airbrush by Harder & Steenbeck - YouTube

I've never used this airbrush but I heard very good reviews about it as a detail airbrush and it is a more reasonable price, for parts too. I'm sure someone on the forum can tell you more about it.
cheers Mel

I would agree on this one, I have the Infinity. I don't use it much at all, but it may serve you well.
 
H

HCP-draggin

Guest
most of my airbrushes have the back-stops, but they never get used. When I got my Infinity I played with the quick-set back stop for a while, and haven't touched it since.

Generally, I recommend avoiding using them, especially when learning. You don't want to start using them as a crutch in place of skill. My hands have always had a slight tremor to them, but for whatever reason, once I start airbrushing, they'll calm down. I'd say use it if you have to, but use it as little as you can.

The other reason I don't use them is simply that they really don't work that well. You'd think that setting the trigger movement to a certain point would lead to very consistant lines, but thats not really the case. Unless your paint is at a 100% consistant viscosity, completely strained, and doesn't tip dry, the lines will vary too much to make the back stop a really accurate tool. If you find that paint, let me know.
 
K

ko.

Guest
Coast stocks an Iwata handle from another line that will work pefectly just give them a call
 
T

Tigertron

Guest
I have yet to figure out how it's supposed to work but I normally remove the handle and leave it off so I can get the needle out and clean it easier.
 

Mr.Micron

Royal pain in the air hose
Admin
In a perfect world and your paint is playing nice the trigger set is a great thing. But we all know this is not the perfect world so sometime you have to play with it and the paint to make it work ..
But unless you just have a lot of cash you want to spend I would suggest you buying the Krome.
I do own a micron cm-c+ and other than missing the mac valve when I use the Krome I am really hard pressed to tell you the difference.
I find myself reaching for the Krome more than I thought I would .
 
A

ad fez

Guest
and if need be, if you want the mac valve you can get those seperate ones that come with the quick disconnect??/ dunno how good they are but they are meant to do the same thing.
 
R

Ranger370

Guest
Coast stocks an Iwata handle from another line that will work pefectly just give them a call

Thanks! I just called Coast and ordered the new handle and a quick connect set. They say it is a simple handle change so I'll have both handles for my Eclipse. I am happy that I will be able to try it before I buy another airbrush. I really like my Eclipse and if this works for me it will be the best of both worlds...ko, thanks again!!!
 
D

donec

Guest
Hi Ranger,
You could also look at the Harder & Steenbeck Infinity that has a Quick Fix limiter which only they make. It allows you to set a limit on you trigger but also you can click this off and it gives you full travel again. If you want to go back to the trigger limit you previously set then you just push the button in and it will go back to the same setting. This could be great for you and gives you complete freedom to set a limit on the trigger, release it to blow out a clog or clean the cup out and then click back to your limiter again.

Here is a video that shows you the Infinity 2 in 1 (0.15 and 0.4mm) and also how the Quick Fix limiter works, you can also buy the Infinity Solo 0.15mm.
Infinity airbrush by Harder & Steenbeck - YouTube

I've never used this airbrush but I heard very good reviews about it as a detail airbrush and it is a more reasonable price, for parts too. I'm sure someone on the forum can tell you more about it.
cheers Mel
The idea of being able to engage the limiter and disengage it is a great idea. Wish they would make one for the talon.
 
M

Melbee

Guest
Thanks! I just called Coast and ordered the new handle and a quick connect set. They say it is a simple handle change so I'll have both handles for my Eclipse. I am happy that I will be able to try it before I buy another airbrush. I really like my Eclipse and if this works for me it will be the best of both worlds...ko, thanks again!!!

So which Iwata handle with a limiter did you buy that fits the Eclipse?
 
B

Bossman

Guest
I don't know how anyone can use them when you need to constantly clear your brush... kinda like a reset, to make sure the tip is clear. Sorta like 10 seconds of tight fine work, and then turn the brush blast it in the air to clean it and wipe the needle and go again.
 
R

Ranger370

Guest
So which Iwata handle with a limiter did you buy that fits the Eclipse?

Melbee, I honestly don't know which model it comes from. I talked to the lady at Coast and described what I wanted and she knew exactly what I was after. I told her I didn't want the handle that has the needle hold back and she said no problem that the one she is sending is a needle limiting type. I'll let you know the model number when it arrives. I understand all the issues with clearing the needle, etc but I have to at least try it and see if I can make it work with my disability. Lifelong practice is not going to cure my twitchy trigger fiinger and I am just trying to minimize the problem when it occurs. Unlike you experts who do this for a living I am just a hack artist who does it for stress relief and physical therapy but I do like to do the best I can.
 

Squishy

Queen Clown Slayer
Melbee, I honestly don't know which model it comes from. I talked to the lady at Coast and described what I wanted and she knew exactly what I was after. I told her I didn't want the handle that has the needle hold back and she said no problem that the one she is sending is a needle limiting type. I'll let you know the model number when it arrives. I understand all the issues with clearing the needle, etc but I have to at least try it and see if I can make it work with my disability. Lifelong practice is not going to cure my twitchy trigger fiinger and I am just trying to minimize the problem when it occurs. Unlike you experts who do this for a living I am just a hack artist who does it for stress relief and physical therapy but I do like to do the best I can.
Gotta be worth a try Ranger. Yes it might be a pain if you have to keep loosening it to clear your nozzle, but if that's what needs to happen to get you painting, then a little annoyance is probably worth it. Over reducing your paint and lowering your pressure, can help with that, it just means you will have to do more layers, but doing this should stop major clogging, and a little bit of tip dry can just be carefully picked off, so no trigger stop adjustment necessary. And that is a good thing anyway it gives you more control over tones and stops you going too dark too soon. I personally don't use one, as I find the amount of pull back on the trigger can vary from stroke to stroke, but if it helps your particular situation it's all good. Your twitch may be with you for life, but once your muscle memory developes I think you may find some improvement over time even if it is just slight. Your comment made me think though, about who does this for a living, and who does it just as a hobby. I'm not sure there are that many who do this as their day job although I may be wrong. It's made me wonder how many actually make their living at this, as I think there are many people who would like to. I know there are a few like myself who started as a hobby ( and in my case therapy) and now get paid for jobs occasionally and are trying to go farther, some who are just good at selling stuff for a bit of extra money on the side, and some who just want to cover costs and upgrade equipment, and many who do it just for the enjoyment, but I wonder what the ratio really is?
 
K

ko.

Guest
If you need to blast you just loosen the handle.Blast and tighten it up. same setting is saved. the stop hits the chuck not the needle Ranger IMO they do have there place I dont use mine much but for repeating fine lines over and over and....... you get the point.. Besides they look really cool lol
 
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R

Ranger370

Guest
Thanks everyone for your input. I'm sure the limiter won't be the magic cure for me but anything that helps is worth investigating. I don't mind putting down thinner layers as opposed to having to paint white over a bad blow out and starting again. I'm probably crazy for even trying airbrushing with my hands but I don't ever have to get perfect. I can admire what I see others do and try to imitate their work because a man always needs a challenge or he might as well get out the rocking chair...LOL
 
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