Two Questions

Alkimyst

Double Actioner
Hi Guys,

I've had two questions regarding practice I've wanted to ask here for some time - but held back - thinking I could find answers elsewhere online or in the forum archives... alas, I didn't find a complete answer so here it goes:

1. What are your thoughts on dot/line/dagger/fade practice exercise speed? For example, in Daniel's course (for those of you taking it as well), he suggests slow speed, gradual buildup of the target, which I have been doing.

Conversely, some of the resources in the 'customs' community that I have seen recommend blasting through tighter (smaller grid) control exercises as quickly and as accurately as possible, with the thinking that you can always slow down, but speed/accuracy is harder to develop if you only shoot slowly (Rob @ DredFX comes to mind). To be honest, I've been doing both - alternating between low-pressure, gradual build-up drawn out grids, dots, fades, and higher pressure (40-45 psi/ createx paint), fast-paced exercises - some on news print, some on paper towels. Which brings me to question #2...

2. T-Shirt Airbrushing and Calligraphy: does anyone have any practice tips, other than practicing lots of thick/thin loops [thanks @ airbrushtutor, wherever in OZ you are keep spreading the love!] or attempting to mimic people who are already quite proficient - Dale the Airbrush Kid, I mean, GUY. :) or Ken Johnson?

Photorealism is the ideal goal down the road, but currently I find that when I practice, spraying at higher pressures and on paper towels is oddly satisfying. I'd just like to tighten up the cursive. (Uh, I think I may have answered my own question...) I know: more reps.

So I guess, for those who have been down this road ahead of us beginners, any direction, especially on the calligraphy, is much appreciated.

Off to test the Badger 155 with the bent needle tip :sus: I got today in the mail. I've been alternating between top/bottom-feed Iwata HP-CS/BPS's to practice lately; I noticed that the T-Shirt artists all seem to use bottom feed brushes, I'm guessing due to the quick bottle changes and paint volume sprayed.

Cheers!

Al
 
to answer #1, accuracy is what Daniels bootcamp is focusing on, the speed will come as your confidence grows. No point going fast if your lines are all over the place. Doing lines / cursive slowly will be wobbly but once you are laying it down in the right place repetition will build your muscle memory and then the speed will increase naturally as your confidence grows. Airbrush tutors lessons on loops is great.
#2 again, repetition is your friend

I know its frustrating, we've all been there but think back to any new skill you've tried learning in the past, like driving, you weren't driving a manual car at 110km in the first week, cooking in the kitchen - how long did it take you to do something other than toast, It all takes time.

Please don't hesitate to ask questions here, chances are it's been covered and if not you may be also helping others that are a bit shy to ask.
we have no ego's here, they're checked at the door so nobody is going to reprimand you and suggest you take a $$$$$ course, This forum has always been about helping each other out regardless of their skill levels.
 
to answer #1, accuracy is what Daniels bootcamp is focusing on, the speed will come as your confidence grows. No point going fast if your lines are all over the place. Doing lines / cursive slowly will be wobbly but once you are laying it down in the right place repetition will build your muscle memory and then the speed will increase naturally as your confidence grows. Airbrush tutors lessons on loops is great.
#2 again, repetition is your friend

I know its frustrating, we've all been there but think back to any new skill you've tried learning in the past, like driving, you weren't driving a manual car at 110km in the first week, cooking in the kitchen - how long did it take you to do something other than toast, It all takes time.

Please don't hesitate to ask questions here, chances are it's been covered and if not you may be also helping others that are a bit shy to ask.
we have no ego's here, they're checked at the door so nobody is going to reprimand you and suggest you take a $$$$$ course, This forum has always been about helping each other out regardless of their skill levels.
Thank you for the reply JackEb!

You know, I realised as I read the second paragraph of your post that the answers were already there: that speed follows accuracy, repetition, and time... I'll approach this like any other skills acquisition challenge. Thanks for the reaffirmation. :thumbsup: Much appreciated.
 
Thank you for the reply JackEb!

You know, I realised as I read the second paragraph of your post that the answers were already there: that speed follows accuracy, repetition, and time... I'll approach this like any other skills acquisition challenge. Thanks for the reaffirmation. :thumbsup: Much appreciated.
As we get older we tend to forget the 'basics' of things we do. learning takes time, mastery takes a lifetime :)
 
While I haven't learn from Daniel's boot camp I did learn from his series one and two videos. All pros make it look fast and easy but as Jackie stated slow and steady and the speed comes over time.
What took me days or even weeks when I first started now take a lot less time , Not that I am rushing it it is just more natural now.
Everything you paint now or ever is just practice for the next painting. I practice at least an hour a night most of the time it is 2 hours.
But it took me some time to work out a practice schedule and stick too it.
 
While I haven't learn from Daniel's boot camp I did learn from his series one and two videos. All pros make it look fast and easy but as Jackie stated slow and steady and the speed comes over time.
What took me days or even weeks when I first started now take a lot less time , Not that I am rushing it it is just more natural now.
Everything you paint now or ever is just practice for the next painting. I practice at least an hour a night most of the time it is 2 hours.
But it took me some time to work out a practice schedule and stick too it.
Thanks @Mr.Micron. Understood. It's all building it seems... I've got an alarm set to remind me to practice at the same time every day while I'm still doing physio post surgery for the hand. It's coming along (almost full range back in the left hand) 👌. BTW, I tested out that new to me Badger Anthem in today's practice session and I like it! I also found a spot for it... 😉
Have a good night.
 

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Thanks @Mr.Micron. Understood. It's all building it seems... I've got an alarm set to remind me to practice at the same time every day while I'm still doing physio post surgery for the hand. It's coming along (almost full range back in the left hand) 👌. BTW, I tested out that new to me Badger Anthem in today's practice session and I like it! I also found a spot for it... 😉
Have a good night.
That is a great looking case and nice collection of airbrushes.
Happy to hear you have a practice schedule in place and that your recovery is going well.
 
2. T-Shirt Airbrushing and Calligraphy: does anyone have any practice tips, other than practicing lots of thick/thin loops [thanks @ airbrushtutor, wherever in OZ you are keep spreading the love!] or attempting to mimic people who are already quite proficient - Dale the Airbrush Kid, I mean, GUY. :) or Ken Johnson?
I would suggest separate thread for t-shirts. I have few tips for t-shirt airbrushing(not practise related), but it would be nice to have those tips in separate thread.

Now if we talking about practise. I hate dots and dagger strokes and lines and all the practise you can imagine. But I love doing t-shirts. The best practise I found for myself was to pick some design and just go for it on the t-shirt. I understand we all different. For me the best practise is when I actually am doing a t-shirt cause I love doing them and that is what keeps me going. I was practising on paper towels at the beginning. Oh boy that was boring like hell....

You can steal all the old t-shirts from your wife, girlfriend, kids, friends,parents, neighbours from the yard at night when they are drying their t-shirts :lipssealed: and just go for the real deal and airbrush those old t-shirts. Just remember. Paint will fade fast, cause those t-shirts are soaked with the stuff you use when you wash your cloth.
 
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I've been alternating between top/bottom-feed Iwata HP-CS/BPS's to practice lately; I noticed that the T-Shirt artists all seem to use bottom feed brushes, I'm guessing due to the quick bottle changes and paint volume sprayed.
I bought for the same reason eclipse bcs. Then I needed to buy smaller cups(paschee ones) cause I am reducing my colors...

Also wonna add. When you look at those videos on you tube, keep in mind those guys are doing this for years. And for sure they did bunch of screw ups before they manage to be on the level they are now. So have realistic expectation from yourself.

Maybe a good practise if you draw design with graffiti pencil on a t-shirt like in this video and then just go for it. Who cares if you destroy a t-shirt. You stole it from your neighbour so it doesn't cost you anything -.-

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I have done a few shirts and a cap with heat transfer vinyl but haven't gotten around to brushing any shirts yet :)
 
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I have done a few shirts and a cap with heat transfer vinyl but haven't gotten around to brushing any shirts yet :)
you have a heat press? I am assuming there is a possibility you do have one if you did vinyl.
 
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I have done a few shirts and a cap with heat transfer vinyl but haven't gotten around to brushing any shirts yet :)
Iron Maiden t-shirt in progress?

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:cool:🤘
 
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