wanna get some splattering

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matthewmoore3

Guest
Hi,

I am getting interested in getting an airbrush for helping color illustration with...

but actually im not so much looking for the super smooth airbrush effect (though that might be useful), but more like slightly biggers spots

its more like something i would use as part of various techniques to get a finished picture, kind of organic looking... is it possible to vary spot size/density with an airbrush? i dont know much about it..

i tried doing it with covering a toothbrush with watery paint and kind of flicking the bristles.. it gave the right kind of size dots.. but little fine control of where they went, hence im thinking of an airbrush.. as the stuff i will be doing would be relatively intricate..

if an airbrush cant do this please let me know, or perhaps there is a another tool anyone can think of..

thanks, Matthew
 

Strictly Attitude

Air-Valve Autobot!
Yes this is easy for an ab to do. There various methods for this effect all very controlable especially compared to flicking the bristles of a tooth brush. I would recomend a badger velocity krome for you as this brush would work for illustration detail as well if you wanted it to and easy on the pocket as well.

John

"Be good or be good at it"
 

AndreZA

Air-Valve Autobot!
An airbrush with a protective cap works great. You need the cap because you need to press the tip against another surface and you don't want to risk damaging the needle. I personally use an ice cream stick or tongue depressor but Airbrushtutor uses a pencil.

How to Airbrush Rock Textures - YouTube
 
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Russ Allen

Guest
I would say great recommendation by Strictly on the Badger Krome!

I personally just use the airbrush if I dont have a lot of splatter. Pull the trigger back without pressing down, then push forward, then aim the brush where you want your splatter and just press down on the trigger for a burst of air. Do this on a test panel first and get the feel for it. I can do larger splatters or fine splatters using this technique, just takes some getting used to as far as how far to pull the trigger back. The farther you pull it back, the more paint that will be on the needle tip, causing a larger splatter, just barely pulling the trigger back, gives you minimal splatter.

If I have a larger area, I use the same technique as Andre, the toungue derpresser works perfect! I use this method a lot when making a granite background. Good luck, and I would definitely get the Krome, because once you start playing with the airbrush, you'll want to start doing more with it, and you'll have a damn fine brush to do it with!!!
 
D

drobbins12

Guest
Krome for sure, great price for the quality of airbrush. There are a lot of effects besides the splatter that you can pull off.

WARNING: Airbrushing is highly addictive!
 

ignis

Needle-chuck Ninja
I just replied to a elated topic in AirbrushDoc: You can make any conventional airbrush spatter without buying a spatter cap. Turn down the air pressure so that the paint only just comes out of the airbrush. It should give a rather wide, irregular line. Then pull back the trigger all the way, quickly lift the index finger to release it, letting the spring push it back into the rest position. Depending on the water : paint mix ratio (I use between 10 : 1 and 20 : 1) you should get a controllable spatter pattern. You could do it as quick as you read, tic, tic, tic in this line to cover small or large areas with spattering. The lower the air pressure, the bigger the spatter droplets will be.
 
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matthewmoore3

Guest
wow thanks everyone for the replies.. :chuncky:

ill definatly check out the badger krome, thanks for the recommendation and try out the mentioned techniques, you have been a great help!

im happy to find out you can do this kind of stuff with an airbrush, i hadnt given them much thought before, but can imagine as mentioned it can get addictive..
 

wickedartstudio

Mac-Valve Maestro!
If you use a braided air line on your brush (hard plastic lines will not work for this) you can also kink and un kink the hose rapidly while spraying. This technique will give a "splattered" effect. The effect varies from different distances and is very controlled with a little practice.
 
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ad fez

Guest
If you use a braided air line on your brush (hard plastic lines will not work for this) you can also kink and un kink the hose rapidly while spraying. This technique will give a "splattered" effect. The effect varies from different distances and is very controlled with a little practice.
hhhhhhmmmmmm aaahhhhhhhhhh
 
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